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Sa.myutta Nikaaya
V. Mahaa Vagga
55. Sotaapatti Sa'nyutta
III. Sara.naani Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
V. The Great Chapter
55. Kindred Sayings on Streamwinning
III. Sarakaani[1]

Sutta 21

Pa.thama Mahaanaama Sutta.m

Mahaanaama (a)

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[320]

[1][than] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying among the Sakyans near Kapilavatthu, in the Banyan Park.

Now Mahaanaama[2] the Sakyan came to see the Exalted One,
and on coming to him saluted him and sat down at one side.
As he thus sat Mahaanaama the Sakyan said this to the Exalted One:

'Lord, this town of Kapilavatthu is rich,
prosperous, populous,
crowded with men,[3]
a dense mass of folk.[4]

Now, lord, when I enter Kapilavatthu at eventide
after waiting upon the Exalted One
or the worshipful monks,
I meet with elephants,
horses, chariots,
carts and men,
all swaying and rolling along.[5]

At such times, lord, my thoughts,
which are fixed on the Exalted One,
on the Norm and the Order,
are simply bewildered.

Then it occurs to me:
If I were at this very moment to make an end,
what would be my lot,
what would be my destiny
in the life to come?'

'Have no fears, Mahaanaama!
Have no fears, Mahaanaama!

Blameless will be your death.

You will make a blameless end.

For he whose mind, Mahaanaama,
has for a long time been practiced in faith,
in virtue,
in learning,
in giving up and insight,
- though this material body of his,
of the four elements compounded,
from parents sprung,
of a nature to be worn away,
pounded away,
broken and scattered,[6]
though this body be devoured by crows and vultures,
devoured by [321] kites and dogs,
- yet his mind,
if longtime practiced in faith,
virtue,
learning,
giving up
and insight,
the mind soars aloft,
the mind wins the summit.[7]

Suppose, Mahaanaama,
a man plunges a jar of butter
or a jar of oil
into a deep, deep pool of water,[8]
and breaks it,
and it becomes shards or fragments,
and sinks down to the bottom;
but the butter or oil that is in it
floats up and reaches the surface,
- just so, Mahaanaama,
if the mind has long been practiced in faith
virtue,
learning,
giving up
and insight,
- though this material body of his,
of the four elements compounded,
from parents sprung,
of a nature to be worn away,
pounded away,
broken and scattered,
though this body be devoured by crows and vultures,
devoured by kites and dogs,
- yet his mind,
if longtime practiced in faith,
virtue,
learning,
giving up
and insight,
the mind soars aloft,
the mind wins the summit.

Now your mind, Mahaanaama,
has long been practiced in faith,
virtue,
learning,
giving up
and insight.

Have no fear, Mahaanaama!
Have no fear, Mahaanaama!

Blameless will be your death.

You will make an end that is blameless.'

 


[1] Or Sara.naani (text), the name of a Sakayan, gives the title to this chapter and §4. [Ed.: Altered here]

[2] For Mahaanaama, cf. text, 327, 371, etc.

[3] For these phrases, cf. D. i, 211; S. ii, 106; Mil. Pa~nh., 130.

[4] Sambaadha-byuuha'n. Comy. anibbiddha-racchaayo saa pavi.t.tha-maggen' eva nigacchati.

[5] Bhantena (fr. bhamati); text misprints in each case bhante na (as if it were 'lord, not').

[6] Cf. K.S. iv, 50 n.

[7] Uddha'ngaamii, visesa-gaamii.

[8] Cf. the same simile at K.S. iv, 313.


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