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Sa.myutta Nikaaya
3. Khandha Vagga
22. Khandha Sa.myutta
1. Nakulapita Vagga

The Connected Discourses of the Buddha
Part II.
The Book of the Aggregates Khandha-Vagga
22. Connected Discourses on the Aggregates
I. Nakulapitaa

Sutta 2

Devadaha Sutta.m

At Devadaha

Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

"OoBhikkhu Bodhi 2000., The Connected Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2000)
This selection from The Connected Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the Sa.myutta Nikaaya by Bhikkhu Bodhi is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha.
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[5] [856]

[1][pts][than] Thus have I heard.

On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Sakyans where there was a town of the Sakyans named Devadaha.

Then a number of westward-bound bhikkhus approached the Blessed One, paid homage to him, sat down to one side, and said to him:

"Venerable sir, we wish to go to the western province in order to take up residence there."

"Have you taken leave of Saariputta bhikkhus?"

"No, venerable sir."

"Then take leave of Saariputta bhikkhus.

Saariputta is wise, he is one who helps his brothers in the holy life."

[6] "Yes, venerable sir," those bhikkhus replied.

Now on that occasion the Venerable Saariputta was sitting not far from the Blessed One in a cassia bush.

Then those bhikkhus, having delighted and rejoiced in the Blessed One's statement, rose from their seats and paid homage to the Blessed One.

Then, keeping him on their right, they approached the Venerable Saariputta.

They exchanged greetings with the Venerable Saariputta and, when they had concluded their greetings and cordial talk, they sat down to one side and said to him:

"Friend Saariputta we wish to go to the western province in order to take up residence there.

We have taken leave of the Teacher."

"Friends, there are wise khattiyas, wise brahmins, wise householders, and wise ascetics who question a bhikkhu when he has gone abroad - for wise people, friends, are inquisitive:

'What does your teacher say, what does he teach?'

I hope that you venerable ones have learned the teachings well, grasped them well, attended to them well, reflected on them well, and penetrated them well with wisdom, so that when you answer you will state what has been said by the Blessed One and will not misrepresent him with what is contrary to fact; so that you will explain in accordance with the Dhamma, and no reasonable consequence of your assertion would give ground for criticism."

"We would come from far away, friend, to learn the meaning of this statement from the Venerable Saariputta.

It would be good indeed if the Venerable Saariputta would clear up the meaning of this statement."

"Then listen and attend closely, friends, I will speak."

"Yes, friend," those bhikkhus replied.

The Venerable Saariputta said this:

[7] "There are, friends, wise khattiyas, wise brahmins, wise householders, and wise ascetics who question a bhikkhu when he has gone abroad - for wise people, friends, are inquisitive:

'What does your teacher say, what does he teach?'

Being asked thus, friends, you should answer:

'Our teacher, friends, teaches the removal of desire and lust.'

"When you have answered thus, friends, there may be wise khattiyas ... wise ascetics who will question you further - for wise people, friends, are inquisitive:

'In regard to what does your teacher teach the removal of desire and lust?'

Being asked thus, friends, you should answer:

'Our teacher, friends, teaches the removal of desire and lust for form, the removal of desire and lust for feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness.'

"When you have answered thus, friends, there may be wise khattiyas ... wise ascetics who will question you further - for wise people, friends, are inquisitive:

'Having seen what danger does your teacher teach the removal of desire and lust for form, the removal of desire and lust for feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness?'

Being asked thus, friends, you should answer thus:

'If, friends, one is not devoid of lust, desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving in regard to form, then with the change and alteration of form there arise in one sorrow, lamentation, pain, displeasure, and despair.

If, friends, one is not devoid of lust, desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving in regard to feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness, then with the change and alteration of consciousness there arise in one sorrow, lamentation, pain, displeasure, and despair.

Having seen this danger, our teacher teaches the removal of desire and lust for form, the removal of desire and lust for feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness.'

[8] "When you have answered thus, friends, there may be wise khattiyas ... wise ascetics who will question you further - for wise people, friends, are inquisitive:

'Having seen what benefit does your teacher teach the removal of desire and lust for form, the removal of desire and lust for feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness?'

Being asked thus, friends, you should answer thus:

'If, friends, one is devoid of lust, desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving in regard to form, then with the change and alteration of form sorrow, lamentation, pain, displeasure, and despair do not arise in one.

If one is devoid of lust, desire, affection, thirst, passion, and craving in regard to feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness, then with the change and alteration of consciousness sorrow, lamentation, pain, displeasure, and despair do not arise in one.

Having seen this benefit, our teacher teaches the removal of desire and lust for form, the removal of desire and lust for feeling ... perception ... volitional formations ... consciousness.'

"If, friends, one who enters and dwells amidst unwholesome states could dwell happily in this very life, without vexation, despair, and fever, and if, with the breakup of the body, after death, he could expect a good destination, then the Blessed One would not praise the abandoning of unwholesome states.

But because one who enters and dwells amidst unwholesome states dwells in suffering in this very life, with vexation, despair, and fever, and because he can expect a bad destination with the breakup of the body, after death, the Blessed One praises the abandoning of unwholesome states.

"If, friends, one who enters and dwells amidst wholesome states would dwell in suffering in this very life, with vexation, [9] despair, and fever, and if, with the breakup of the body, after death, he could expect a bad destination, then the Blessed One would not praise the acquisition of wholesome states.

But because one who enters and dwells amidst wholesome states dwells happily in this very life, without vexation, despair, and fever, and because he can expect a good destination with the breakup of the body, after death, the Blessed One praises the acquisition of wholesome states."

This is what the Venerable Saariputta said.

Elated, those bhikkhus delighted in the Venerable Saariputta's statement.


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