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Sa.myutta Nikaaya
3. Khandha Vagga
22. Khandha Sa.myutta
1. Nakulapita Vagga

The Connected Discourses of the Buddha
Part II.
The Book of the Aggregates Khandha-Vagga
22. Connected Discourses on the Aggregates
I. Nakulapitaa

Sutta 5

Samaadhi Sutta.m

Concentration

Translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi

"OoBhikkhu Bodhi 2000., The Connected Discourses of the Buddha (Wisdom Publications, 2000)
This selection from The Connected Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the Sa.myutta Nikaaya by Bhikkhu Bodhi is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
Based on a work at http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/connected-discourses-buddha.
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[13] [863]

[1][pts][than][olds] Thus have I heard.

At Saavatthii. ...

There the Blessed One said this:

"Bhikkhus, develop concentration.

A bhikkhu who is concentrated understands things as they really are.

"And what does he understand as it really is?

The origin and passing away of form; the origin and passing away of feeling; [14] the origin and passing away of perception; the origin and passing away of volitional formations; the origin and passing away of consciousness.

"And what, bhikkhus, is the origin of form?

What is the origin of feeling?

What is the origin of perception?

What is the origin of volitional formations?

What is the origin of consciousness?

"Here, bhikkhus, one seeks delight, one welcomes, one remains holding.

And what is it that one seeks delight in, what does one welcome, to what does one remain holding?

One seeks delight in form, welcomes it, and remains holding to it.

As a consequence of this, delight arises.

Delight in form is clinging.

With one's clinging as condition, existence [comes to be]; with existence as condition, birth; with birth as condition, aging-and-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, displeasure, and despair come to be.

Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering.

"One seeks delight in feeling ... in perception ... in volitional formations ... in consciousness, welcomes it, and remains holding to it.

As a consequence of this, delight arises. ...

Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering.

"This, bhikkhus, is the origin of form; this is the origin of feeling; this is the origin of perception; this is the origin of volitional formations; this is the origin of consciousness.

"And what, bhikkhus, is the passing away of form?

What is the passing away of feeling?

What is the passing away of perception?

What is the passing away of volitional formations?

What is the passing away of consciousness?

"Here, bhikkhus, one does not seek delight, one does not welcome, one does not remain holding.

And what is it that one does not seek delight in?

What doesn't one welcome?

To what doesn't one remain holding?

One does not seek delight in form, does not welcome it, does not remain holding to it.

As a consequence of this, delight in form ceases.

With the cessation of delight comes cessation of clinging; with cessation of clinging, cessation of existence. ...

Such is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.

"One does not seek delight in feeling ... [15] ... in perception ... in volitional formations ... in consciousness, does not welcome it, does not remain holding to it.

As a consequence of this, delight in consciousness ceases. ...

Such is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.

"This, bhikkhus, is the passing away of form; this is the passing away of feeling; this is the passing away of perception; this is the passing away of volitional formations; this is the passing away of consciousness."


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