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2017

Saturday, August 12, 2017
Previous upload was Monday, January 30, 2017

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On the Intent Associated with Virtuous Behavior

"The fable of Ixion, who, embracing a cloud instead of Juno, begot the Centaurs, has been ingeniously enough supposed to have been invented to represent to us ambitious men, whose minds, doting on glory, which is a mere image of virtue, produce nothing that is genuine or uniform, but only, as might be expected of such a conjunction, misshapen and unnatural actions. Running after their emulations and passions, and carried away by the impulses of the moment, they may say with the herdsmen in the tragedy of Sophocles,

We follow these, though born their rightful lords,
And they command us, though they speak no words.

For this is indeed the true condition of men in public life, who, to gain the vain title of being the people's leaders and governors, are content to make themselves the slaves and followers of all the people's humors and caprices. For as the lookout men at the ship's prow, though they see what is ahead before the men at the helm, yet constantly look back to the pilots there, and obey the orders they give; so these men, steered, as I may say, by popular applause, though they bear the name of governors, are in reality the mere underlings of the multitude. The man who is completely wise and virtuous, has no need at all of glory, except so far as it disposes and eases his way to action by the greater trust that it procures him. A young man, I grant, may be permitted, while yet eager for distinction, to pride himself a little in his good deeds; for (as Theophrastus says) his virtues, which are yet tender and, as it were in the blade, cherished and supported by praises, grow stronger, and take the deeper root. But when this passion is exuberant, it is dangerous in all men, and in those who govern a commonweakh, utterly destructive. For in the possession of large power and authority, it transports men to a degree of madness; so that now they no more think what is good, glorious, but will have those actions only esteemed good that are glorious. As Phocion, therefore, answered king Antipater, who sought his approbation of some unworthy action, "I cannot be your flatterer, and your friend," so these men should answer the people, "I cannot govern and obey you." For it may happen to the commonwealth, as to the serpent in the fable, whose tail, rising in rebellion against the head, complained, as of a great grievance, that it was always forced to follow, and required that it should be permitted by turns to lead the way. And taking the command accordingly, it soon inflicted, by its senseless courses, mischiefs in abundance upon itself, while the head was torn and lacerated with following, contrary to nature, a guide that was deaf and blind. And such we see to have been the lot of many, who, submitting to be guided by the inclinations of an uninformed and unreasoning multitude, could neither stop, nor recover themselves out of the confusion."

Plutarch, Lives of Illustrious Men, translated from the Greek by John Dryden and others in 3 volumes. Volume III, pg 61-62, David McKay, no copyright or publication date.

 


 

new Thursday, June 08, 2017 7:26 AM Majjhima Nikaaya. The Bhikkhu ~Naa.namo.li 3-volume manuscript used as the basis for the Bhk. Bodhi edited edition. "Manuscript" here means hand written! and his script is no easy thing to read. Note that the PDFs and zipped downloads are very large files.
Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 1 ~Naa.namo.li PDF for on line viewing.
Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 2 ~Naa.namo.li PDF for on line viewing.
Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 3 ~Naa.namo.li PDF for on line viewing.
Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 1 ~Naa.namo.li PDF download (Zipped PDF file).
Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 2 ~Naa.namo.li PDF download (Zipped PDF file).
Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 3 ~Naa.namo.li PDF download (Zipped PDF file).
[MN 1.1] The Root of All Dhammas, the Bhikkhu ~Naa.namo.li translation. A typeset rendering of the Bhikkhu ~Naa.namo.li translation of MN 1.1, published in Pali Buddhist Review, Volume 5 #1-2, page 1, 1980.
The images for the pdf files were sent to me by Bhikkhu Hiriko at pathpress.org after I requested permission to publish this work from them. He informed me that this work is managed by Path Press, The Island Hermatage and The Forest Hermatage and that it was a matter of courtesy to check in with them concerning usage. I did e-mail both The Island Hermatage and The Forest Hermatage, but have received no answer. 'Perceiving that they agreed silently,' I am putting up these files with gratitude and the hope that this does not conflict with their wishes. If there is any objection by the Island Hermatage, or the family of Bhk. Nanamoli to our publication of this work on this site it will be removed immediately. Otherwise consider it published for the use of individual researchers seeking to determine precisely what changes were made by Bhk. Bodhi.

Monday, January 30, 2017
Previous upload was Saturday, December 31, 2016

 


 

Announcements

At this time two additional mirrors of this site have been set up by Nicolas Kermarc:

fr.buddhadust.net, and
hk.buddhadust.net.

Two zip-files of the latest version of the site will henseforth be available for download:

buddhadust.net/buddhadust-latest.zip (1.2 GB) The entire site.
buddhadust.net/buddhadust-latest-lite.zip (300 MB) The entire site exclusive of zip and PDF resources.

In the 'lite' version the html files have been edited to link to the zip and PDF files hosted on buddhadust.net.

These files will be updated as the site is updated.

The permanent location of these links will be on the Files and Download Links page.

 


 

new Sunday, January 22, 2017 8:16 AM Majjhima Nikaaya, [MN 8] Hoeing the Row, Olds, trans.
Maha Cunda approaches the Buddha to ask how to eliminate ideas of 'I' and 'mine'. The Buddha's response is to give him pairs of opposites to be resolved upon, thought of, used as guides to follow, things leading upward and which will scour out ideas of 'I' and 'Mine.'

 

new Friday, January 13, 2017 11:47 AM Majjhima Nikaaya,[MN 22] The Snake Simile Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
A wide-ranging very famous sutta that begins with a forceful teaching on the dangers of indulgence in sense pleasures. This sutta contains two famous similies: the similie of the snake illustrating how a wrong grasp of the Dhamma is like taking hold of a poisonous snake from the wrong end; and the simile of the raft illustrating how the Dhamma should be used to attain it's ends and then be let go. The sutta concludes with a thorough examination of the way 'not self' should be considered.

 

Mount Meru (Sumeru, Sineru)

DPPN: Sineru. A mountain, forming the centre of the world. It is submerged in the sea to a depth of eighty-four thousand yojanas and rises above the surface to the same height. It is surrounded by seven mountain ranges - Yugandhara, Iisadhara, Karaviika, Sudassana, Nemindhara, Vinataka and Assaka.n.na. On the top of Sineru is Taavati.msa, while at its foot is the Asurabhavana of ten thousand leagues; in the middle are the four Mahaadiipaa [great islands or lands or continents] with their two thousand smaller diipa.
Sineru is often used in similes, its chief characteristic being its unshakability (su.t.thu.thapita). It is also called Meru or Sumeru, Hemameru, and Mahaaneru. Each Cakkavaala [world system] has its own Sineru, and a time comes when even Sineru is destroyed.

"... nay i had removed its very stone to the back side of Mount Káf."1

1 Popularly rendered Caucasus (see Night cdxcvi): it corresponds so far with the Hindu "Udaya" that the sun rises behind it; and the "false dawn" is caused by a hole or gap. It is also the Persian Alborz, the Indian Meru (Sumeru), the Greek Olympus, and the Rhiphæn Range (Veliki Camenypoys) or great starry girdle of the world, etc.

A vision attained by those who 'see', Mt. Meru is not a physical place in the ordinary world though it is a representation of a real perception from 'on high.'

To toss something beyond Mt. Meru (Mt. Káf) is to cast it out of this world.

- The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1, pg 72, translated by Richard F. Burton, Printed by The Burton Club for Private Subscribers only, 1885.

 


 

new Sunday, January 01, 2017 3:40 AM Majjhima Nikaaya,
Chalmers, FD 2, scansFD 2 A PDF file of the page-images of Further Dialogues II (MN 77-152). This is a very poor quality scan with 2 pages missing, no frontmatter and no indexes, just the suttas, but it will do to check the html files if that is desirable.
The html formatted Lord Chalmers, Sacred Books of the Buddhists translation, Further Dialogues of the Buddha, Vol. II.
[MN 115] Bahu-Dhaatuka Sutta.m, Diverse Approaches
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha defines what it is that makes a person wise.
A very informative sutta when it comes to the study of equivalants in the Dhamma.
[MN 116] Isigili Sutta.m, A Nominal List
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Piyadassi Thera translation and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha sings the praises of a number of paccekabuddhas.
A very old way of remembering the past practiced in Ancient Greece (where some teachers are reported to have memorized the entire contents of large libraries) and throughout the Ancient East, still practiced by some tribes in Africa. Before writing and the printing press, and the radio, and the TV and the computer and the i-phone, the mere recollection of a single word or name would bring to mind a much expanded story as handed down from generation to generation. In the Buddha's time it was expected that a person could at least remember the history of his family back seven generations on both sides. We see evidence in the udanas at the ends of chapters in the Pali of how this technique was used to memorize the entire collection of suttas before it was written down. Recently 'rediscovered' this memory enhansing method can now be found advertised on late night TV and on the Internet whence you can pay a hefty sum to learn to make associations in the mind.
[MN 117] Mahaa Cattaariisaka, Right Views Rank First
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation and the Sister Upalavana translation.
In this sutta the Buddha teaches that there is a misguided way and a high way and that the high way may be undertaken in a low way and a high way depending upon one's point of view, the direction of one's effort and the set of one's mind.
Note in this sutta the definition of 'Sammaa Di.t.thi' High View. It is on this sutta that a certain school of Buddhism holds that any effort at accomplishment is mundane practice and that there is nothing to do to attain the super-mundane practice. If they have any logic to their reasoning it is because this so-called supermundane practice is made up entirely of letting go. But letting go is still kamma, action, something to be done and often requires great effort just to get to the point where letting go is possible. I am of the belief that the intent in this sutta was not to suggest two separate paths, but to create awareness that if a practice is pursued with grasping the result will not be the liberation one saught. In practice one will tread both paths, first with grasping and then upon becoming aware of the grasping, with letting go.
[MN 118] Aanaapaana-Sati Sutta.m, On Breathing Exercises
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation the M. Olds translation and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha explains how recollecting aspiration developed and made much of, completely perfects the four settings-up of memory; the four settings-up of memory, developed and made much of, completely perfects the seven dimensions of awakening; the seven dimensions of awakening, developed and made much of, completely perfects freedom through vision.
[MN 119] Kaayagataa-Sati Sutta.m, Meditation on the Body
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha goes into detail concerning minding the body.
This sutta is identical with the section in the Satipatthana Suttas concerning body. What is unique about it is that it is divided from minding the breath which is described in the preceding sutta. Remember that the Buddha states that he considers breath and body to be equivalents.
[MN 120] Sa'nkhaar'uppatti Sutta.m, Plastic Forces
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha teaches how the intent to create experience for the self results in rebirth in accordance with the intent in a sequence that progresses from the intent to experience rebirth as a wealthy or powerful individual through a detailed list of gods to Arahantship.
Lord Chalmers here has both reverted to his previous translation of Sankhaaraa as 'plastic forces' and taken on to that the definition of it as being faith, virtue, instruction, munificence and understanding. This is not supported by the Pali. There is no 'these five Sankhaaraa' there. In the 'wherever are these Sankhaaraa' the 'these' refers back to the previous set (fixing his heart, setting his heart, training his heart in this translation). He confirms his error in the following cases but breaks down towards the end, using there 'qualities'. He is not alone in his confusion. Both Bhk. Bodhi and Ms. Horner's translations of Sankhaaraa change in this sutta. The confusion results from their original translations, which, say I, should always have followed the Pali etymology and been translated 'own-making' or at the least 'construction'.
[MN 121] Cuu.la Su~n~nata Sutta.m, True Solitude I
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the M. Olds translation, the Nyanamoli Thera translation edited and arranged by Phra Khantipalo and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha teaches Ananda a technique for reaching an undisturbed state empty of lust, hate and blindness.
[MN 122] Mahaa Su~n~nata Sutta.m, True Solitude II
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the M. Olds translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha extoles living in solitude and describes the effort the student must make to return again and again to each stage of the path when upon evaluation of his accomplishments he realizes he is not yet satisfied that he is completely liberated.
[MN 123] Acchariya-abbhuuta Sutta.m, Wonders of the Nativity
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Ananda relates what he has heard about certain wonderous events that accompanied the birth of the Buddha.
[MN 124] Bakkula Sutta.m, A Saint's Record
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Bakkula utters a lion's roar to his old friend the wanderer Kassapa the Unclothed who is so impressed he joins the order and soon attains arahantship himself.
As receoved this sutta is flawed. It begins as a telling by an individual of the encounter of Bakkula with an old friend that he converts. Early on, however, there is interjected (Chalmers: 'intercalated') a refrain reputedly uttered by the Compilers. Presumably this was because the sutta was added to the collection at a late point and the compilers, to be forthright needed to make the fact known. It would have been better to have stated this at the start. As it is it has a disjointed feel which breaks the spell.
The sutta describes the wonderful scene of Bakkhula going from door to door among the bhikkhu's huts anouncing to the bhikkhus that he was going to die and if they wanted to witness the same they should come along now.
[MN 125] Danta-Bhuumi Sutta.m, Discipline
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha describes the course of training for a bhikkhu.
This sutta has in it the simile of two friends, one of whom climbs a mountain and describes what he can see from the summit. The other friend doubts such as is described. So then the first climbs down the mountain again and leads his friend by the hand to the top where he realizes that he could not see the sights because his view was obscured by the mountain. The mountain = blindness.
[MN 126] Bhuumija Sutta.m, Right Outlook Essential
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha explains that it is not enough to have hopes, aspirations, yearnings for freedom from pain, one must behave in a way that brings pain to and end for that to happen. He provides four similes to illustrate this point: trying to get oil by pressing sand, trying to get milk by pulling a bull's horn, trying to get butter by churning water, and trying to light a fire with a wet sappy stick.
[MN 127] Anuruddha Sutta.m, As They Have Sown
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Venerable Anuruddha explains the difference between 'boundless' freedom of mind and 'wide-spread' freedom of mind and then answers further questions concerning the manner in which 'wide-spread' freedom of mind manifests it's results in rebirth in a deva world.
[MN 128] Upakkilesa Sutta.m, Strife and Blemishes
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha is not able to halt the argument and contention of the sangha in Ghosita's vihara in Kosambi and so moves on to Visit Bhago in Balakallonakara village where he teaches him Dhamma and then he visits the Anuruddhas staying in the Eastern Bamboo Grove there. There he teaches the Anuruddhas in great detail the process of eliminating the obstructions to clairvoyant sight and describes the method of jhana practice in threes which he himself used to attain arahantship.
An absolutely invaluable sutta when it comes to developing insight, clairvoyance and the jhaanas.

 

Developing Psychic Powers
and
Jhaana Practice that Leads to Awakening

Being an analysis of Majjhima Nikaya, Sutta 128
by
Michael Olds

After first having understood the goal, having trained in ethical thinking and behavior, having trained in self-control to the point where living intent on the goal is such as to be able to say of one's self that one is living carefully, ardently and self-directed [pahitattaa]:

Intent on stilling, calming and tranquilizing the breath or on some other subject that absorbs the attention, at a point where one is fully alert and attention has been fully focused on that object to the exclusion of external distractions, there will occasionally appear a brilliant flash of white light [obhaasa] something like a flash of sunlight in a dark room; and there will occasionally appear clear mental visions [dassana~n ca ruupaana.m: and seeing forms (in the mind)]. But these will quickly vanish.

To extend the duration of these phenomena it is necessary to ask yourself: What were the signs [nimitta] of the driving forces, what was it that resulted in the vanishing of the light and the perception of shapes?

Note the direction of this thinking: it is not "how do I prolong the light/visions", but "what brought them to an end?" The implied presumption is that the light/visions will be there in one who is in a state of calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation [samaadhi] if what is causing them to vanish is eliminated.

They may have vanished because of doubts [Vicikicchaa]. "What was that?" "Was that a flash of sunshine breaking into my hut? or was that a real vision?" "Was that a vision or was that just a daydream?" "Can I have possibly got to the point where I can see 'the Light' and see real visions?" Doubt having arisen, one's state of calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation [Samaadhi] has been broken.

As one deals with doubt, the light and visions may re-appear for a time and again vanish. So one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of distraction, inattention, or lack of mental study [amanasikaara]. One must clear the decks for the development of the state of calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation that is required for the development of psychic powers, jhaanas and release. Examine your environment to exclude external distractions. Meditate in a room empty of decorations, do-dads, mementos. Let it be known that you are not to be disturbed. As for internal inattention, in the early stages it will be necessary to exert energy as an act of will to bring back focus on one's object; later it will be a matter of bringing one's self to a state of recollection of what one is about.

As one deals with distraction and inattention, and doubt, the light and visions may re-appear for a time and again vanish. So one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of sleepiness and sluggishness of mind [thiinamiddha].

Sleepiness and sluggishness of mind can result from over-eating and indulging in the pleasure of sleeping. Over-eating that can result in sluggishness can be over-eating just as little as a mouthful more than is needed to sustain the body. Or eating even a very small amount at the wrong time (especially of sugary foods and drink): after one's main meal before noon. Sleepiness can be the result of regret. In that case regret must be put out of the mind by understanding and compensatory actions. Sleepiness can be a result of poor posture. Sit down sitting up straight, legs crossed, head, neck and body such as to bring the spine into alignment. Not abandoning proper posture prematurely when it has become painful will soon cause the pain to disappear and alertness return. Squirming and worming around will perpetually disturb the impassivity that is a pre-requisite of a state of calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of fright [Chambhitatta].

At the realization that what one is about in this business of cultivating the mind to calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation that will lead to the deathless and living outside of time, apart from sense pleasures, the pleasures of existence and all the fun, joys and delights you have experienced since Time beyond recollection, there may arise sudden fear of losing all this, otherwise known as the fear of death.

The Buddha likens this state to that of one who has been travelling along peacefully who is suddenly attacked from both sides by a band of murderous thieves.

Both sides because at this point one sees the dangers in indulgence in sense pleasures on the one side and thinks that on the other side giving it all up is like death.

At this point you must still, calm and tranquillize both the body and mind and bring your attention to the idea that there is nothing there that is or ever has been stable, of enduring pleasure or that belongs to the self. In other words you must realize that this calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation leading to Ultimate Freedom from Pain, Deathlessness and Living Outside Time, is what you have been telling yourself is what you really want. You have finally come face to face with yourself. And you must prevail in this battle between giving up and self-indulgence at this point.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of jubilance [Ubbilla.m]. Jumping for joy (without the shouting and jumping). Eureka! I'v got it! I'm an Arahant at last! I have found Nibbana!

Calm down. You're not there yet. You've only just started.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear and jubilation, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of slipping into corruption [Du.t.thulla.m].. Those visions can be a temptation or be steared into the tempting. Indulgence in sexual fantasy at an intense level presents itself. [Lust] One may discover the ability to work revenge for imagined wrongs in ways unthoughtof before. [Hate] Power can be tempting. Ingenious ways of attaining power and wealth present themselves and before one realizes it one is off on a completely irrelevant track. Having come this far one is seeing ever higher levels of temptation and so, why not? go a little farther, see what else is on offer. [Blindness]. It's time to retrench. Take a look. You need to convince yoursel of the sincerity of your seeking Nibbana. The lasting pleasure promised by these things is an illusion. Let them go.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear and jubilation and corruption, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of excessive exertion of energy, drive [Accaaraddha-viriyaa].

They may have vanished because of too slack exertion of energy, drive [Atiliina-viriyaa].

In the case of excessive energy, mind, focus the mind on developing calm; still, calm and tranquillize the breathing; Let It All Go! the three factors of self awakening: impassivity (being unaffected by the onslaught of sensations), serenity (calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation, i.e. [samaadhi]) and detachment.

In the case of too slack energy, mind, focus the mind on insight; the three factors of self-awakening: investigation of Dhamma (dig around on this site, we got plenny'nuf satisfactmactory mastication factory; find something that sounds interesting and bear down on it), energy building (energy is created by the expendature of energy), and entheusiasm (dig around in your memory for examples of the benefits you have experienced from this practice; focus for a time on these benefits).

The Buddha gives two similies for the problem of balancing energy:

1. Grasping a bird too tightly will kill it; grasping it too lightly and it will fly away.

2. Stringing a lute too tightly or too losely will both distort the sound it produces.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear and jubilation and corruption and excessive energy and too slack energy, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of an overriding appetite [Abhijappaa].

Some desires are so all-pervasive in one's life that they have become unnoticable and only come to consciousness when either they become realizable or when detachment from them becomes possible. The desire for power. "At last I have attained such an advanced state in meditation that I can say I am the best of all." Appetite for fame. Need for approval. Fear of destitution and the resulting appetite for safe refuge. Appetite for sexual gratification, gratification of the senses, at a level way beyond the ordinary. Even appetite to be evil in extraordinary ways. Strong over-riding appetites either to get or get away from. Suddenly awakening to such appetites can throw one off track and require a complete re-evaluation of one's intent when it comes to seeking Enlightenment.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear and jubilation and corruption and excessive energy and too slack energy and over-riding appetites, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of diverse perceptions [Naanatta-sa~n~naa]. At this level worlds open up to perception. Each of these worlds purports to be the highest and best and to provide long life and well-being and invites one to explore and abide there a while ... becoming, of course, subserviant to the powers that be there. Here the meditator needs to exert his ability to generalize. The Buddha has spoken of all things that have come into existence as being transitory, essentially painful, and not belonging to self: i.e., not what one has set out to find. If this world offering itself to one's perception is one defined as being in existence, then back off, let it go, do not risk the huge amounts of time lifetimes in these worlds takes up. You may not easily find again a world in which a Buddha's Dhamma is taught. Go as far as you can letting go of it all without thought of indulgence.

Again, as one deals with sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear and jubilation and corruption and excessive energy and too slack energy and over-riding appetites and diverse perceptions, the light and visions may reappear for a time and then vanish and one must once again examine the situation.

They may have vanished because of excessive indulgence in knowing shapes [Atinijjhaayitatta.m ruupana.m].

Perhaps you have gone too far in this business of trying to sustain the perception of light and shapes?

The problems from this point are:
Perception of light but not shapes: the result of over-focus on the light;
Perception of shapes but not light: the result of over-focus on perception of shapes;
Weakness in the perception of light and shapes; the result of weakness in ones state of calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation

At this point you have developed another practice: by the elimination of diversions [Niivara.naa] or the corruptions of the heart [cittassa upakkilesa]: sluggishness and distraction and doubt and fear and jubilation and corruption and excessive and slack energy and over-riding appetites and diverse perceptions, one has developed one's state of calm impassive wakeful serene focused observation in three ways:

1. Accompanied by thought and pondering [savitakka and savicaara]. SA-VITAKKA: With-re-talking; Word-thought or formulated thought; SA-VICAaRA With-re-tour-ing, turning over in the mind, wandering thoughts; and pondering situations and issues.
Accompanied by thought only - without pondering;
Accompanied by pondering only - without word-thought.

2. Accompanied by entheusiasm [Sappiitika]
With entheusiasm settled down.

3. Wakeful serene focused observation together with pleasure [Saata-sahagata]
Detached wakeful serene focused observation [Upekkhaa-sahagatam].

And what more remains to be done?

Recognizing at this point that this is freedom
and in this freedom, seeing freedom
knowing that in this way one may bring about
the leaving of rebirth behind
the culmination of living the Godly Life
the completion of one's duty,
and the end of being any sort of 'it' at any place of 'atness.'

This analysis will be permanently located under Dhammatalk, Sitting Practice

 


 

[MN 129] Baala Pa.n.dita Sutta.m, Wisdom and Folly
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha delivers a discourse on the Peril and the Advantages. The pain that one of poor conduct brings upon himself here and now and in Animal birth or Hell hereafter, and the glory that one of consummate conduct brings upon himself here and now or in heavenly birth hereafter.
A discourse on the Peril and Advantages usually follows, in the Gradual Course, the training in Generosity, Ethical Culture and Self-control and is then followed by instruction in the setting up of the Mind and the Four Truths.
[MN 130] Devaduuta Sutta.m, Heaven's Warning Messengers
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha speaks about his personal knowledge of Yama, lord of Judgment and Yama's messages to mankind: a baby lying in it's own excrement, an old man or woman; a sick man or woman; a man being tortured for misdeeds; and a dead body. Then he describes the horrors of Hell.
[MN 131] Bhadd'Eka-Ratta Sutta.m, True Saint I
One Lucky Day, the M. Olds translation of the verses with a brief summary of the analysis,
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Buddhist Publication Society, Bhikkhu Ñanananda translation with a long introduction, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
A lucky charm. A sutta describing a lucky night as being one in which one does not hanker after the past, yearn for the future, and in which one remains detached among things present.

 

Bhadd'Eka-Ratta

Atiita.m naanvaagameyya,||
nappa.tikankhe anaagata.m.|| ||

Yad atiita.m pahiina.m ta.m,||
appatta~n ca anaagata.m.|| ||

Paccuppanna~n ca yo dhamma.m||
tattha tattha vipassatii.|| ||

Asa'nhiira.m asankuppa.m||
ta.m vidvaa manubruuhaye.|| ||

Ajj'eva kiccam aatappa.m;||
ko ja~n~naa mara.na.m suve?|| ||

Na hi no sangara.m tena||
mahaasenena maccunaa.|| ||

Eva.m vihaarim aataapi.m||
ahorattam atandita.m.|| ||

Ta.m ve 'bhadd'eka-ratto' ti,||
santo aacikkhate munii ti.|| ||

 


 

One Lucky Day1

Turn not again to what is past,
nor after futures hanker.

Let go the past,
and futures not yet come.

But do research
those things appearing here,

And drawn not in, nor shaken by
what's found from man has sprung,

This Very Day in duty's doing, burning
for certain good; - for sure is death tomorrow;

No pacts are ever made
with Judgment's great battalions! -

Live you therefore ardent,
unremitting Night and Day,

If indeed you'd have it said: 'One Lucky Day
he became a sage at peace'.

 


1Ratta = Night, the beginning of the Ancient Indian day. I don't buy the translation of this term as 'attachment'. First off, see verse five and then ponder the focus on the present day. Then, neither the verses nor the analysis hint of attachment as the subject. The idea, as I hear it, is that letting go of the past, not making plans for the future, one attends to the comprehension of the day at hand, cultivating insight into transience, pain and not-self through seeing it's having been man-made (or own-made) and finding stability in such perception one is considered to have had a lucky day.

In brief, the analysis goes:

Turning again to the past means reminiscing about and taking pleasure in the recollection of one's past shape, experiences, perceptions, own-makings, and conscious states.

Hankering after the future means imagining, wishing for, intending to get, and taking pleasure in conjuring up means to get future shape, experience, perception, own-making and conscious states.

Not being drawn in or shaken by things of the present means having schooled one's self in the Dhamma, one does not consider shape, experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness as: "This is my self," or "My self has this," or "My self is in this", or "This is in My Self."

-MN 131, 132, 133, 134.

 

[MN 132] Aananda-Bhadd'Eka-Ratta Sutta.m, True Saint II
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Ananda repeats a lucky charm. A sutta describing a lucky night as being one in which one does not hanker after the past, yearn for the future, and in which one remains detached among things present.
[MN 133] Mahaa Kaccaana-Bhadd'Eka-Ratta Sutta.m, True Saint III
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Maha Kaccana explains Bhaddekaratta Sutta to the Bhikkhus. A sutta describing a lucky night as being one in which one does not hanker after the past, yearn for the future, and in which one remains detached among things present.
[MN 134] Lomasaka'ngiyai-Bhadd'Eka-Ratta Sutta.m, True Saint IV
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Venerable Lomasakangiyai repeats a lucky charm. A sutta describing a lucky night as being one in which one does not hanker after the past, yearn for the future, and in which one remains detached among things present.
[MN 135] Cuu.la Kamma-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, Our Heritage from Our Past I
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, Ñanamoli Thera translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the M. Olds translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
A straight-forward presentation of kamma in terms of what sort of deeds lead to a short lifespan versus a long lifespan, having many illnesses versus having few illnesses, being ugly versus being handsome, being insignificat versus being influencial, being poverty stricken versus being wealthy, being high-born versus being of lowly birth, and being dim-witted versus being wise.

 

Destiny is Self-Made

"Kamma is "one's own", brahman youth,
beings are heirs to their Kamma.

Kamma is the womb,
Kamma is one's ancestors,
Kamma is the judge.

Kamma separates beings
into low states and high states."

Killing living beings leads to shortness of life-span;
abstention from killing leads to length of life-span;
behavior inflicting many pains leads to having many illnesses;
behavior inflicting few pains leads to having few illnesses;
ugly, angry, disagreeable, contrary, hateful, resentful behavior leads to ugliness;
being of pleasing disposition leads to beauty;
jealousy leads to being of no account;
empathy, happiness at the happinesses of others leads to being of great account;
stinginess leads to poverty;
generosity leads to wealth;
disrespect leads to being low born;
paying due respect to the respect-worthy leads to being high born;
failure to inquire leads to weakness of wisdom;
questioning the wise conduces to greatness of wisdom.

-MN 135

 

[MN 136] Mahaa Kamma-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, Our Heritage from Our Past II
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, Ñanamoli Thera translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the M. Olds translation (abridged), and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha explains the workings of kamma: good deeds produce good results, bad deeds produce bad results in spite of cases where this law does not appear to be working.
[MN 137] Sa.laayatana-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, Senses and Objects of Sense
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
An in-depth analysis of the six realms of the senses.

 

Analysis of the Six Realms

Six internal realms are to be experienced:

The Realm of the Eye
The Realm of the Ear
The Realm of the Nose
The Realm of the Tongue
The Realm of the Body
The Realm of the Mind

Six external realms are to be experienced:

The Realm of Shapes
The Realm of Sounds
The Realm of Scents
The Realm of Tastes
The Realm of Touch
The Realm of Things

Six bodies of Consciousness are to be experienced:

Eye Consciousness
Ear Consciousness
Nose Consciousness
Tongue Consciousness
Body Consciousness
Mind Consciousness

Six bodies (kaya) of Self-Contact (sam-phassa) are to be experienced:

Eye Self-Contact
Ear Self-Contact
Nose Self-Contact
Tongue Self-Contact
Body Self-Contact
Mind Self-Contact

It is at this point, where sense organ meets sense-object, that individualized perception of sense arises; emerges from an undifferentiated background.

Eighteen Ponderings are to be experienced:

Seeing Shapes with the Eye

Thinking arising from shapes on which Satisfaction is established
Thinking arising from shapes on which Dissatisfaction is established
Thinking arising from shapes on which Detachment is established.

Hearing Sounds with the Ear

Thinking arising from sounds on which Satisfaction is established
Thinking arising from sounds on which Dissatisfaction is established
Thinking arising from sounds on which Detachment is established.

Smelling Scents with the Nose

Thinking arising from Scents on which Satisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Scents on which Dissatisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Scents on which Detachment is established.

Savouring Tastes with the Tongue

Thinking arising from Tastes on which Satisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Tastes on which Dissatisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Tastes on which Detachment is established.

Feeling Contacts with the Body

Thinking arising from Contacts on which Satisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Contacts on which Dissatisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Contacts on which Detachment is established.

Consciousness of Things with the Mind

Thinking arising from Things on which Satisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Things on which Dissatisfaction is established
Thinking arising from Things on which Detachment is established.

Thirty-six Paths Beings Tred are to be Experienced:

Six worldly situations giving Satisfaction

Getting the experience of or contimplating getting the experience of or recollecting the getting of the experience of seeing pleasing shapes with the eye;

Getting the experience of or contimplating getting the experience of or recollecting the getting of the experience of hearing pleasing sounds with the ear;

Getting the experience of or contimplating getting the experience of or recollecting the getting of the experience of smelling pleasing scents with the nose;

Getting the experience of or contimplating getting the experience of or recollecting the getting of the experience of savouring pleasing tastes with the tongue;

Getting the experience of or contimplating getting the experience of or recollecting the getting of the experience of feeling pleasing contacts with the body;

Getting the experience of or contimplating getting the experience of or recollecting the getting of the experience of being conscious of pleasing things with the mind;

Six world-abandoning situations giving Satisfaction

Seeing the impermanence of shapes seen with the eye and realizing that past, future or present, all shapes are impermanent and ultimately painful;

Seeing the impermanence of sounds heard with the ear and realizing that past, future or present, all sounds are impermanent and ultimately painful;

Seeing the impermanence of scents smelled with the nose and realizing that past, future or present, all scents are impermanent and ultimately painful;

Seeing the impermanence of tastes savoured with the tongue and realizing that past, future or present, all tastes are impermanent and ultimately painful;

Seeing the impermanence of contacts felt with the body and realizing that past, future or present, all contacts are impermanent and ultimately painful;

Seeing the impermanence of being conscious of things with the mind and realizing that past, future or present, all things are impermanent and ultimately painful;

Six worldly situations giving Dissatisfaction

Not getting the experience of or contimplating not getting the experience of or recollecting the not having gotten the experience of seeing pleasing shapes with the eye;

Not getting the experience of or contimplating not getting the experience of or recollecting the not having gotten the experience of hearing pleasing sounds with the ear;

Not getting the experience of or contimplating not getting the experience of or recollecting the not having gotten the experience of smelling pleasing scents with the nose;

Not getting the experience of or contimplating not getting the experience of or recollecting the not having gotten the experience of savouring pleasing tastes with the tongue;

Not getting the experience of or contimplating not getting the experience of or recollecting the not having gotten the experience of feeling pleasing contacts with the body;

Not getting the experience of or contimplating not getting the experience of or recollecting the not having gotten the experience of being conscious of pleasing things with the mind;

Six world-abandoning situations giving Dissatisfaction

Seeing the impermanence of shapes seen with the eye and realizing that past, future or present, all shapes are impermanent and ultimately painful; and thinking: "O O O when will I enter on and abide in that ultimate Freedom in which the Arahant abides!" he experiences dissatisfaction in connection with abandoning the worldly.

Seeing the impermanence of sounds heard with the ear and realizing that past, future or present, all sounds are impermanent and ultimately painful; and thinking: "O O O when will I enter on and abide in that ultimate Freedom in which the Arahant abides!" he experiences dissatisfaction in connection with abandoning the worldly.

Seeing the impermanence of scents smelled with the nose and realizing that past, future or present, all scents are impermanent and ultimately painful; and thinking: "O O O when will I enter on and abide in that ultimate Freedom in which the Arahant abides!" he experiences dissatisfaction in connection with abandoning the worldly.

Seeing the impermanence of tastes savoured with the tongue and realizing that past, future or present, all tastes are impermanent and ultimately painful; and thinking: "O O O when will I enter on and abide in that ultimate Freedom in which the Arahant abides!" he experiences dissatisfaction in connection with abandoning the worldly.

Seeing the impermanence of contacts felt with the body and realizing that past, future or present, all contacts are impermanent and ultimately painful; and thinking: "O O O when will I enter on and abide in that ultimate Freedom in which the Arahant abides!" he experiences dissatisfaction in connection with abandoning the worldly.

Seeing the impermanence of being conscious of things with the mind and realizing that past, future or present, all things are impermanent and ultimately painful; and thinking: "O O O when will I enter on and abide in that ultimate Freedom in which the Arahant abides!" he experiences dissatisfaction in connection with abandoning the worldly.

Six worldly situations resulting from detachment

To the ordinary common person, having seen a shape with the eye, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Not having seen the danger in and not having overcome desire for pleasurable sights, the detachment that arises is the detachment of the worldly. Such detachment is a mental state; dependent on seeing worldly shapes which are impermanent and therefore it is itself impermanent. Such detachment carries with it the underlying tendency to blindness followed by desires which result in conjuring up (upadana) ways to get such, which results in existence, birth, aging, sickness, suffering and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.

To the ordinary common person, having heard a sound with the ear, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Not having seen the danger in and not having overcome desire for pleasurable sounds, the detachment that arises is the detachment of the worldly. Such detachment is a mental state; dependent on hearing worldly sounds which are impermanent and therefore it is itself impermanent. Such detachment carries with it the underlying tendency to blindness followed by desires which result in conjuring up (upadana) ways to get such, which results in existence, birth, aging, sickness, suffering and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.

To the ordinary common person, having smelled a scent with the nose, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Not having seen the danger in and not having overcome desire for pleasurable scents, the detachment that arises is the detachment of the worldly. Such detachment is a mental state; dependent on smelling worldly smells which are impermanent and therefore it is itself impermanent. Such detachment carries with it the underlying tendency to blindness followed by desires which result in conjuring up (upadana) ways to get such, which results in existence, birth, aging, sickness, suffering and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.

To the ordinary common person, having tasted a savour with the tongue, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Not having seen the danger in and not having overcome desire for pleasurable tastes, the detachment that arises is the detachment of the worldly. Such detachment is a mental state; dependent on tasting worldly savours which are impermanent and therefore it is itself impermanent. Such detachment carries with it the underlying tendency to blindness followed by desires which result in conjuring up (upadana) ways to get such, which results in existence, birth, aging, sickness, suffering and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.

To the ordinary common person, having felt a contact with the body, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Not having seen the danger in and not having overcome desire for pleasurable contacts, the detachment that arises is the detachment of the worldly. Such detachment is a mental state; dependent on feeling worldly contacts which are impermanent and therefore it is itself impermanent. Such detachment carries with it the underlying tendency to blindness followed by desires which result in conjuring up (upadana) ways to get such, which results in existence, birth, aging, sickness, suffering and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.

To the ordinary common person, having had consciousness of a thing with the mind, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Not having seen the danger in and not having overcome desire for pleasurable states of consciousness, the detachment that arises is the detachment of the worldly. Such detachment is a mental state; dependent on being conscious of worldly things which are impermanent and therefore it is itself impermanent. Such detachment carries with it the underlying tendency to blindness followed by desires which result in conjuring up (upadana) ways to get such, which results in existence, birth, aging, sickness, suffering and death, grief and lamentation, pain and misery and despair.

Six world-abandoning situations resulting from detachment

To the well educated student of the Aristocrat having seen a shape with the eye, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Seeing the impermanence of shapes seen with the eye and realizing that past, future or present, all shapes are impermanent and ultimately painful, he experiences the detachment of the world-abandoning. Such detachment goes beyond this world to detachment from all that which has been own-made.

To the well educated student of the Aristocrat having heard a sound with the ear, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Seeing the impermanence of sounds heard with the ear and realizing that past, future or present, all sounds are impermanent and ultimately painful, he experiences the detachment of the world-abandoning. Such detachment goes beyond this world to detachment from all that which has been own-made.

To the well educated student of the Aristocrat having smelled a scent with the nose, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Seeing the impermanence of scents smelled with the nose and realizing that past, future or present, all scents are impermanent and ultimately painful, he experiences the detachment of the world-abandoning. Such detachment goes beyond this world to detachment from all that which has been own-made.

To the well educated student of the Aristocrat having tasted a savour with the tongue, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Seeing the impermanence of savours tasted with the tongue and realizing that past, future or present, all savours are impermanent and ultimately painful, he experiences the detachment of the world-abandoning. Such detachment goes beyond this world to detachment from all that which has been own-made.

To the well educated student of the Aristocrat having felt a contact with the body, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Seeing the impermanence of contacts felt with the body and realizing that past, future or present, all contacts are impermanent and ultimately painful, he experiences the detachment of the world-abandoning. Such detachment goes beyond this world to detachment from all that which has been own-made.

To the well educated student of the Aristocrat having cognized a thing with the mind, there arises not-painful-but-not-pleasant experience. Seeing the impermanence of things cognized with the mind and realizing that past, future or present, all things are impermanent and ultimately painful, he experiences the detachment of the world-abandoning. Such detachment goes beyond this world to detachment from all that which has been own-made.

Using the one,
abandon the other.

Using the six world-abandoning situations giving satisfaction,
abandon the six worldly situations giving satisfaction

Using the six world-abandoning situations giving dissatisfaction
abandon the six worldly situations giving dissatisfaction

Using the six world-abandoning situations resulting from detachment
abandon the six worldly situations resulting from detachment.

There is a diversity of detachments where detachment is situated on the diverse:

Such is detachment from shape,
such is that from sound
such is that from scent
such is that from savour
such is that from contact

Note that in this case there is no detachment situated on the mind. Such a thing is not possible. This sort of detachment is detachment while still identifying with a self and that, being an idea in the mind, precludes detachment from the mind.

There is a single sort of detachment where detachment is situated on that which is not based on diversity of perception:

Such is detachment from the Realm of Endless Space-situated;
such is that from the Realm of Endless Consciousness-situated;
such is that from the Realm of No Things Had There-situated; such is that from the Realm of Neither-Perception-nor-Non-Perception-situated.

In this case the nature of the detachment is the same for each situation because the nature of each situation on which that detachment is based is the same: abandoning. The Realm of Endless Space, for example is arrived at by wholly transcending perception of material shapes, by the settling down of perception of sensory reactions, by not attending to perception of variety, thinking: 'Space is unending,'; the Realm of Endless Consciousness is arrived at by abandoning the Realm of Endless Space, etc. Said another way, there is detachment attached to 'things' (equanimity) which changes from thing to thing, and there is detachment from all things which is based on the single process that is abandoning.

Using the single detachment singly-situated,
abandon diversity detachment diversity-situated.

- based on, but not a traslation of MN 137.

 

[MN 138] Uddesa-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, A Summary Expanded
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha advises the bhikkhus that when investigating things one's consciousness should not be allowed to wander in such a way as to allow thoughts supporting further existence whether that be of externals such as sense experience or of internals such as the factors of the jhanas.
[MN 139] Ara.na-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, Calm
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha goes into detail concerning disengagement caused by either biases towards or biases against.
This is really an elaboration of the Middle Way first given in the first sutta.
[MN 140] Dhaatu-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, The Six Elements
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Pukkusati, who was a wanderer who had become a follower of the Buddha without ever having met him, finds himself lodged in the same shed with him. The Buddha instructs him in great detail concerning the attitudes to take towards all the characteristics of existence such as to attain an unshakable calm. He requests ordination, but is not equipped with the necessary bowl and robes. Setting out to get such he is killed by a bull. The Buddha tells the other Bhikkhus he was reborn as a non-returner.
[MN 141] Sacca-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, The Synopsis of Truth
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the Piyadassi Thera translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Sariputta defines each of the Four Truths and each of the terms within the Four Truths.
Note that this is almost identical to the end of the expanded version of the Satipatthana Sutta found in DN, the portion that makes it different from the version found in MN. Note that this much is termed that which gives birth to the convert.

 

Paa.li Olds Horner Bhk. Thanissaro Bhks. Nanamoli/Bodhi Piyadassi Thera Upalavana
Dukkha Pain Anguish Stress Suffering Suffering Unpleasantness
Sammaa High or Consummate Perfect or Right Right Right Right Right
Di.t.thi Working Hypothesis, View Right View View View Understanding View
Sa'nkappa Principles Aspiration Resolve Intention Thought Thoughts
Vaacaa Speech Speech Speech Speech Speech Speech
Kammanta Works Action Action Action Action Action
Aajiiva Lifestyle Livelihood Livelihood Livelihood Livelihood Livelihood
Vaayaama Self-control Endeavour Effort Effort Effort Effort
Sati Mind Mindfulness Mindfulness Mindfulness Mindfulness Mindfulness
Samaadhi Serenity Concentration Concentration Concentration Concentration Concentration

 

[MN 142] Dakkhi.na-Vibha'nga Sutta.m, Analysis of Almsgiving
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha provides a scale for the expected kammic return on gifts to individuals and gifts to the Order in it's various forms.
A sutta for those wishing to calculate their kammic savings account. Note here is a sutta which explicitly states that gifts given 'to the Sangha' are superior in yield even to that of a gift given to a Buddha. It is very important that one wishing to make such a gift state this at the time the gift is being given. Otherwise the kammic result is that of a gift given to an individual. The formula goes something like this: "Please accept this gift to the Sangha from me, as a favour to me." For a detailed discussion of giving in general see Advantage Giver in the Forum Archives.
[MN 143] Anaathapi.n.dik'ovaada Sutta.m, Anaathapi.n.dika's End
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The story of the Dhamma taught to Anathapindika just prior to his death and rebirth in the Tusita Realm.
[MN 144] Chann'ovaada Sutta.m, Channa's Suicide
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Sariputta and Maha Cunda visit Channa who is dying a painful death. Channa announces he will 'take the knife' (commit suicide). Sariputta questions him as to his understanding of Dhamma and Maha Cunda recites for him a saying of the Buddha warning against the wavering that results from attachments. Later, after Channa has 'taken the knife' Sariputta questions the Buddha as to Channa's fate. The Buddha states that his was a blameless end.
[MN 145] Pu.n.n'ovaada Sutta.m, Counsel to Pu.n.na
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Punna, after being given an instruction 'in brief' by the Buddha, is questioned as to how he will deal with the fierce people of Sunaparanta where he intends to dwell. He gives a series of answers which shows he has the patience to deal with them even to the point of death.
[MN 146] Nandak'ovaada Sutta.m, Nandaka's Homily to Almswomen
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
Bhikkhu Nandaka instructs Maha Pajapati's followers on the impermanence of the components of existence and on the Seven Dimensions of Self-Awakening.
[MN 147] Cuu.la Raahul'ovaada Sutta.m, The Transitory
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha's instruction to his son Rahula that brought Rahula to Arahantship. A thorough-going breakdown of what is not to be considered self and why it is not to be considered self.
[MN 148] Cha-Chakka Sutta.m, The Six Sixes
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the M. Olds translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
An elaboration in great detail of the not-self nature of the six sense realms.
[MN 149] Mahaa Sa.laayatanika Sutta.m, Domains of Sense
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
A detailed analysis of how attachment to the six sense realms leads to rebirth and how detachment from the six sense realms leads to the development of the 8-fold path, the four settings-up of memory, the four best efforts, the four power paths, the five forces, the five powers, the seven dimensions of self-awakening, calm and insight and knowledge and freedom (that is, arahantship).
[MN 150] Nagara-Vindeyya Sutta.m, Domains of Sense
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
A discourse on what sort of person should be honored and esteemed.
[MN 151] Pi.n.dapaata-Paarisuddhi Sutta.m, Perils of the Daily Round
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
A sutta which provides a detailed run-down of most of the major 'dhammas' or groups of concepts central to the Buddha's system.
[MN 152] Indriya-Bhaavanaa Sutta.m, Culture of Faculties
Linked to the Pali, the Pali Text Society Horner translation, the Wisdom Publications Ñanamoli Thera translation edited by Bhikkhu Bodhi, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation, the M. Olds translation, and the Sister Upalavana translation.
The Buddha instructs Ananda on the attitude which should be developed with regard to the sense organs, their objects, and the sensations and emotions arising from sense experience. He then describes it as a power of one who has so developed his sense faculties that he can, at will live with whatever attitude and perceptions he may wish among both the ugly and the beautiful.

This concludes the conversion and html formatting of Lord Chalmers', Sacred Books of the Buddhists translation of the Majjhima Nikaaya, Further Dialogues of the Buddha, Vol. II. (MN 77-152). We now have both volumes of Lord Chalmers' translations included here on this site.

 


 

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