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Vinaya Texts

Translated from the Pāli by
T. W. Rhys Davids
and
Hermann Oldenberg

Oxford, the Clarendon Press
[1881]
Vol. XIII of The Sacred Books of the East

This work is in the Public Domain.
Reformatted from the Internet Sacred Text Archive version scanned and formatted by Christopher M. Weimer

The Pātimokkha

tidesaniyā Dhammā
[Index][Pali][ati]

Rules Regarding Matters Which Ought To Be Confessed

 


 

Here, venerable Sirs, the four rules regarding matters which ought to be confessed come into recitation.

1. Whatsoever Bhikkhu, when a Bhikkhunî not related to him has entered within the houses[1], shall, with his own hand, accept at her hands food, either hard or soft, and eat or enjoy it — that is a matter which ought to be confessed by that Bhikkhu, saying, 'I have fallen, Brethren, into a blameworthy offence, unbecoming, which ought to be confessed; and I confess it!'

2. Now Bhikkhus, when they have been invited to laymen's houses, eat. If the Bhikkhunî stay there giving directions, saying, 'Here give curry, give rice here!' the Bhikkhunî ought to be rebuked by those Bhikkhus, saying, 'Stand aside, Sister, as long as the Bhikkhus are eating!' If it should not occur to a single Bhikkhu to rebuke the Bhikkhunî, saying, 'Stand aside, Sister, as long as the Bhikkhus are eating!' — that is a matter that ought to be confessed by those Bhikkhus, saying, 'We have fallen, Brethren, into a blameworthy offence, unbecoming, which ought to be confessed; and we confess it!'

3. Whatsoever Bhikkhu shall accept, with his p. 57 own hand, food, either hard or soft, in such households as have been (by a formal sammuti) declared to be households, under discipline[2], without having been previously invited, and without being sick, and eat it or enjoy it — that is a matter that ought to be confessed by that Bhikkhu, saying, 'I have fallen, Brethren, into a blameworthy offence, unbecoming, which ought to be confessed; and I confess it!'

4. Whatsoever Bhikkhu, while he is dwelling in a place belonging to the class of those forest dwellings which are held to be insecure and dangerous[3], shall accept, with his own hand, at his home, food, either hard or soft, without having previously given notice (of the danger incurred by people that enter that forest), unless he is sick, and shall eat it or enjoy it — that is a matter that ought to be confessed by that Bhikkhu, saying, 'I have fallen, Brethren, into a blameworthy offence, unbecoming, which ought to be confessed; and I confess it!'

Here end the Pātidesaniyas.

 


 

Venerable Sirs, the four rules regarding matters which require confession have been recited.

In respect of them I ask the venerable ones, 'Are you pure in this matter?'

A second time I ask the venerable ones, 'Are you pure in this matter?'

A third time I ask the venerable ones, 'Are you pure in this matter?'

The venerable ones are pure herein. Therefore do they keep silence. Thus I understand.

Here endeth the recitation or the Pātidesaniyas.

 


 

Next: Pātimokkha - Sekhiyā Dhammā

 


[1] Antaragharam pavitthā; that is, during her alms-visit to the village. Compare the 3rd Sekhiya; Mahāvagga I, 23, 3; and Kullavagga VIII, 5, 2.

[2] Sekha-sammatāni kulāni; which the Vibhanga explains as a household grown rich in faith, but poor in goods; where whatever they get is given away to the Order, though the family may be some days in want of it. Compare what is said of Anātha-pindika in the Introduction to the 40th Gātaka (Gātaka I, 228); though his lot had not reached the very lowest limit.

[3] Compare the 29th Nissaggiya.


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