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Saɱyutta Nikāya:
IV. Saḷāyatana Vagga
36: Vedanā Saɱyutta
II. Rahogata Vagga

Sutta 11

Raho-Gataka Suttaɱ

Being Alone

Translated from the Pali by Michael Olds

 


 

[1][bit][pts][than][nypo][bodh] I hear tell.

[2] Once upon a time a certain beggar
approached the Lucky Man and drew close.

Having drawn close
and exchanged greetings and salutations,
he took a seat to one side.

[3] Seated to one side then,
he said this to the Lucky Man:

"Here, bhante, being alone in my chambers,
this train of thought arose:

'Three sensations
are spoken of by the Lucky Man:
[1] pleasant sensation,
[2] painful sensation,
[3] not-painful-but-not-pleasant sensation.

These are the three sensations
spoken of by the Lucky Man.

But then this was said by the Lucky Man:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."'

Now what then is the reconciliation of this[1]
with what was said by the Lucky Man:

'Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain.'"?

[4] "Well done, well done, bhikkhu!

There are three sensations spoken of by me:
[1] pleasant sensation,
[2] painful sensation,
[3] not-painful-but-not-pleasant sensation.

These are the three sensations
spoken of by me.

And additionally this was said by me:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

[1] This, bhikkhu, was said by me
in reference to the transience
of the own-made:[2]

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

[2] This, bhikkhu, was said by me
in reference to the own-made being a distructable thing:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

[3] This, bhikkhu, was said by me
in reference to the own-made being a thing that gets old:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

[4] This, bhikkhu, was said by me
in reference to the own-made being a thing that disappears:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

[5] This, bhikkhu, was said by me
in reference to the own-made being a thing that ends:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

[6] This, bhikkhu, was said by me
in reference to the own-made being a thing subject to reversal:

"Whatsoever is experienced,
that is simply pain."

 

§

 

This next section is saying that all these things are own-made (saŋkhāra).

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Furthermore, bhikkhu, I have declared a sequential[3] putting-away of own-making:

In attaining the first knowing[4]
speech is put away.

In attaining the second knowing
thinking and wandering thoughts are put away.

In attaining the third knowing
affection is put away.

In attaining the fourth knowing,
in-and-out breathing is put away.

In attaining The Realm of Space,
perception of form is put away.

In attaining The Realm of Consciousness,
perception of The Realm of Endless Space is put away.

In attaining The Realm of Nothing to be Had Here,
perception of The Realm of Consciousness is put away.

In attaining The Neither-Perception-nor-Non-Perception Realm,
perception of The Relm of Nothing to be Had Here is put away.

In attaining the ending of perception and sense-experience,
perception and sense-experience are put away.

The beggar who would destroy the corruptions,
has put away lust,
has put away anger,
has put away confusion.

 

§

 

Furthermore, bhikkhu, I have declared a sequential reduction of own-making:

In attaining the first knowing
speech is reduced.

In attaining the second knowing
thinking and wandering thoughts are reduced.

In attaining the third knowing
affection is reduced.

In attaining the fourth knowing,
in-and-out breathing is reduced.

In attaining The Realm of Space,
perception of form is reduced.

In attaining The Realm of Consciousness,
perception of The Realm of Endless Space is reduced.

In attaining The Realm of Nothing to be Had Here,
perception of The Realm of Consciousness is reduced.

In attaining The Neither-Perception-nor-Non-Perception Realm,
perception of The Relm of Nothing to be Had Here is reduced.

In attaining the ending of perception and sense-experience,
perception and sense-experience are reduced.

The beggar who would destroy the corruptions,
has reduced lust,
has reduced anger,
has reduced confusion.

 

§

 

These six have been pacified:

[1] In attaining the first knowing
speech has been pacified.

[2] In attaining the second knowing
thinking and wandering thoughts have been pacified.

[3] In attaining the third knowing
affection has been pacified.

[4] In attaining the fourth knowing,
in-and-out breathing has been pacified.

[5] In attaining the ending of perception and sense-experience,
perception and sense-experience has been pacified.

[6] The beggar who would destroy the corruptions,
has pacified lust,
has pacified anger,
has pacified confusion.

 


[1] This is not easy to construct in English. He sees a disparity in the two statements and seeks a reconcilliation. In English we would say: "You said A. Then you said B. How do you reconcile the two? We would either not repeat the second statement after asking the question or we would repeat both statements. But this is a construction that is occasionally found in the Pali ... and it sets going a sort of beat that reverberates through the rest of the sutta. It looks to be an artifact from the spoken presentation.

[2] Saŋkhāra: San = own, with; khāra = to do or make; so own-make; with-make; con-join; con-jure, con-struct, confect; fabricate. Identification with the intent to create sense-experience for the self by way of acts of thought, word and deed and the resulting identified-with experience. The making of the personal world. Think of the simple statement: "I am going home now." Every word implies ownership or identity. That is 'own'-making. Making things one's own. This is the point where identification with the world begins. Coming out of one experience you inject your "self"-identity into another.

[3] Anupubba: following-before, after/before, stepwise, one thing at a time.

[4] Jhāna: Kenning, Knowing, Seeing, Gnosis, Burning, trance, Absorption, Chan, Zen.

 


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