Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara-Nikāya
III. Tikanipāta
XIV. Yodhājīva Vagga

The Book of the
Gradual Sayings
or
More-Numbered Suttas

Part III
The Book of the Threes

Chapter XIV. The Fighting-Man

Sutta 134

Mitta Suttaɱ

Appearances

Translated from the Pali by
F.L. Woodward, M.A.

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[264]

[1][bit][than][olds] 'Monks, whether there be an appearance
or non-appearance of a Tathāgata,
this causal law of nature,[1]
this orderly fixing of things[2] prevails, namely,
All phenomena are impermanent.

[265] About this a Tathāgata, is fully enlightened,
he fully understands it.
So enlightened and understanding
he declares, teaches and makes it plain.
He shows it forth, he opens it up,
explains and makes it clear:
this fact that all phenomena are impermenent.

[2][than][olds] Monks, whether there is an appearance
or non-appearance of a Tathāgata,
this causual law of nature,
this orderly fixing of things prevails, namely,
All phenomena are misery.[3]

About this a Tathāgata, is fully enlightened,
he fully understands it.
So enlightened and understanding
he declares, teaches and makes it plain.
He shows it forth, he opens it up,
explains and makes it clear:
this fact that all phenomena are misery.

[3][than][olds] Monks, whether there is an appearance
or non-appearance of a Tathāgata,
this causual law of nature,
this orderly fixing of things prevails, namely,
All phenomena are not the self.[4]

About this a Tathāgata, is fully enlightened,
he fully understands it.
So enlightened and understanding
he declares and teaches it,
makes it plain;
he show it forth, opens it up,
explains and makes it clear:
this fact that all phenomena are not the self.

 


[1] Dhātu-dhammaṭṭhitatā = sabhāva-ṭṭhitatā. Comy. Cf. Pts. of Contr. 387, 'that which, as cause, establishes elements as effects.'

[2] Dhamma-niyāmatā,' that which, as cause, invariably fixes things in our minds, as effects.' Cf. S. ii, 25 (K.S. ii, 21), where a further term is added, idappaccayatā, the relation of this to that.'

[3] Dukkhā, 'oppressive.' Comy.

[4] Anattā, 'not within our power (?).' Comy.


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