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Sa'nyutta Nikaaya,
V: MahaaVagga
47. Satipa.t.thana Sa'nyutta
5. Amata-Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
The Great Chapter,
47: Kindred Sayings on the Stations of Mindfulness
Chapter V: The Deathless

Sutta 46

Paa.timokkha Sutta.m

Obligation[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward

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[1][bodh] THUS have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying near Saavatthii,
at Jeta Grove,
in Anaathapi.n.dika's Park.

Then a certain monk came to see the Exalted One
on coming to him greeted him courteously,
and after the exchange of greetings and compliments
sat down at one side.

Seated at one side he said to the Exalted One: -

"Well for me, lord, if the Exalted One should teach me a teaching in brief,
hearing which teaching from the Exalted One
I might dwell solitary,
remote,
earnest,
ardent
and aspiring."

"Well then, monk, you ought to purify the rudiments in good states.[2]

And what are the rudiments in good states?

Herein, monk, do you dwell self-controlled
according to the self-control of the Obligations,[3]
well equipped in your range of practice,[4]
seeing danger in minutest faults,
and, undertaking the precepts,
do you train yourself therein.[5]

Now monk, when you have dwelt self-controlled
according to the self-control of the Obligations,
in your range of practice
[164] well-equipped,
seeing danger in minutest faults,
and when, undertaking the precepts,
you shall have trained yourself therein -
then, monk,
leaning on virtue,
established in virtue,
you should cultivate the four stations of mindfulness.

What four?

Herein a monk dwells in body contemplating body
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards feelings contemplating feelings
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind contemplating mind
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

He dwells as regards mind-states contemplating mind-states
(as transient),
ardent,
composed
and mindful,
by restraing the dejection in the world
that arises from coveting.

Now, monk, when you,
leaning on virtue
and established in virtue,
shall have thus cultivated the four stations of mindfulness, -
then, monk, you may look for that increase in good states
which shall come to you,
whether by night or by day,
and not for decrease in good states."

Then that monk was delighted with the words of the Exalted One
and not long after,
dwelling solitary,
secluded,
zealous,
ardent
and aspiring,
in no long time
attained that goal supreme of the righteous life,
to win which
the clansmen rightly go forth from home
to the homeless.

So that in that very life,
of himself,
he fully understood it,
realized it
and abode therein,
and knew:

'Destroyed is rebirth,
lived is the righteous life,
done is the task,
for life in these conditions
there is no hereafter.'

And that monk was yet another of the Arahants.

 


[1] Paa.timokkha. Cf. D. iii, 77; Dialog. iii, 75.

[2] Supra, text 165; VM. 4.

[3] Comy. 'Here he enjoins the chief of the four siilas (paa.timokkha-sa'nvaro, indriya-sa'nvaro, aajiiva-parisuddhi, paccaya-sannissita-siilaa). Cf. VM. 16 ff.

[4] Aacaara-gocara (pasturage ) -sampanno.

[5] Text has sikkhasu for sikkhaahi.


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