Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Eka-Nipātā

The Book of Ones

Suttas 394-494

Translated from the Pali by Michael Olds

 


 

[394][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the first burning[1],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless[2];
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[395][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the second burning,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[396][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the third burning,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[397][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the fourth burning,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[398][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the heart's release
through friendly vibrations,[3]
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[399][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the heart's release
through sympathetic vibrations,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[400][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the heart's release
through happiness at the happiness's of others,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[401][pts] Beggars, if a beggar produce
the heart's release
through objective detachment,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[402][pts] Beggars, if a beggar live
in a body overseeing body
with such energy, thoughtfulness and recollection
that he releases his worldly coveting and depression[4],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[403][pts] Beggars, if a beggar live
in the senses overseeing the senses
with such energy, thoughtfulness and recollection
that he releases his worldly coveting and depression,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[404][pts] Beggars, if a beggar live
in the heart overseeing the heart
with such energy, thoughtfulness and recollection
that he releases his worldly coveting and depression,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[405][pts] Beggars, if a beggar live
in the Dhamma overseeing the Dhamma
with such energy, thoughtfulness and recollection
that he releases his worldly coveting and depression,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[406][pts] If, beggars, a beggar,
with regard to passion-fraught, unskillful phenomena
that are not present in this visible thing,
resolves, produces and arouses energy,
vigorously applies his mind,
and strives that they not arise[5],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[407][pts] If, beggars, a beggar,
with regard to passion-fraught, unskillful phenomena
that are present in this visible thing,
resolves, produces and arouses energy,
vigorously applies his mind,
and strives to let them go,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[408][pts] If, beggars, a beggar,
with regard to skillful phenomena
that are not present in this visible thing,
resolves, produces and arouses energy,
vigorously applies his mind,
and strives that they arise,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[409][pts] If, beggars, a beggar,
with regard to skillful phenomena
that are present in this visible thing,
resolves, produces and arouses energy,
vigorously applies his mind,
and strives for their non-befuddling,
more and more becoming abundant,
and all round perfecting,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[410][pts] If, beggars, a beggar beget the power-path[6]
consisting of effort-upon-effort
at constructing focused[7] intent,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[411][pts] If, beggars, a beggar beget the power-path
consisting of effort-upon-effort
at constructing focused energy,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[412][pts] If, beggars, a beggar beget the power-path
consisting of effort-upon-effort
at constructing focused mind,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[413][pts] If, beggars, a beggar beget the power-path
consisting of effort-upon-effort
at constructing focused rememberance,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[414][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the guiding-force[8] of faith come to be
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[415][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the guiding-force of energy come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[416][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the guiding-force of memory come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[417][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the guiding-force of focus come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[418][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the guiding-force of wisdom come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[419][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the power[9] of faith come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[420][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the power of energy come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[421][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the power of memory come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[422][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the power of focus come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[423][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the power of wisdom come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[424][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening[10]
that is mind come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[425][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening
that is dhamma-research come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[426][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening
that is energy-building come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[427][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening
that is enthusiasm come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[428][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening
that is impassivity come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[429][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening
that is focus come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[430][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
the dimension of self-awakening
that is objective detachment come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[431][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High View[11] come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[432][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Principles come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[433][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Talk come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[434][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Works come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[435][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Lifestyle come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[436][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Self Control come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[437][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Recollection come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[438][pts] If, beggars, a beggar makes
High Focus come to be,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[439].[12] If, beggars, a beggar,
perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality as finite,
beautiful or ugly,
rises above such, thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[440][pts] If, beggars, a beggar,
perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality as immeasurable,
beautiful or ugly,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[441][pts] If, beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality as finite,
beautiful or ugly,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[442][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality as immeasurable,
beautiful or ugly,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[443][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality
as deep-dark-blue colored,
deep-dark-blue to the eye,
a shining deep-dark-blue,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[444][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality
as golden colored,
golden to the eye,
a shining goldenness,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[445][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality
as blood-red colored,
blood-red to the eye,
a shining blood-redness,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[446][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
seeing external materiality
as pure-white colored,
pure-white to the eye,
a shining pure-whiteness,
rises above such thinking:
"I know, I see,"
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[447][13] If beggars, a beggar,
being material
sees materiality,
if even for only so short a time as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said
of one who makes much of such a thing?

[448][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
not perceiving inner materiality,
sees external materiality,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[449][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
thinking "It shines!"
is drawn in,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

450] If beggars, a beggar,
completely transcending perceptions of materiality,
allowing perceptions of repulsion to subside,
by inattention to perceptions of diversity,
thinking "Space is unending!",
attains the realm of unending space
and makes a habitat of that,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?[14]

[451][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
completely transcending the realm of unending space
attains the realm of unending consciousness
and makes a habitat of that,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[452][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
completely transcending the realm of unending consciousness
attains the realm of unending no thing there
and makes a habitat of that,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[453][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
completely transcending the realm of unending no thing there
attains the realm of neither-perception-nor-non-perception
and makes a habitat of that,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[454][pts] If beggars, a beggar,
completely transcending the realm of neither-perception-nor-non-perception
attains to the ending-of-perception-and-sense-experience
and makes a habitat of that,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[455][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become[15] the earth device,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[456][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the water device[16],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[457][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the firelight device[17],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[458][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the motion device[18],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[459][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the deep-dark-blue device[19],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[460][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the yellow device,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[461][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the blood-red device,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[462][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the white device,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[463][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the space device[20],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[464][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the consciousness device[21],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[465][22] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the unpleasant,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[466][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of death,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[467][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the repellant in food,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[468][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception
of nothing to delight at in all the world,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[469][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of impermanence,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[470][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception
of the pain of impermanence,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[471][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception
of the not-selfness of that which is painful,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[472][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of letting go,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[473][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of un-lust,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[474][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of ending,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[475][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of impermanence,[23]
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[476][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of not-self,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[477][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of death,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[478][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception
of the repellant in food,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[479][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception
of nothing to delight at in all the world,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[480][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the skeleton[24]
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[481][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the maggot infested corpse[25],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[482][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the black-and-blue corpse,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[483][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the corpse that is breaking apart,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[484][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become the perception of the swollen and bloated corpse,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[485][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about the Buddha[26],
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[486][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about the Dhamma,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[487][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about the Sangha,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[488][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about ethical culture,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[489][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about liberality,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[490][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about The Gods,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[491][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about in- and out-breathing,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[492][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about death,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[493][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about
that which is related to the body,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

[494][pts] If beggars, a beggar
makes become thinking about calming down,
if even for only so short a time
as it takes to snap the fingers,
that beggar may be called a bhikkhu;
his burning is not rudderless;
he lives the Master's teaching;
he follows advice;
not without purpose
does he enjoy the handouts of the realm.
What then can be said of one
who makes much of such a thing?

 


[1] Jhāna. See, on high-getting and jhana: the Pali Line: high-getting High

[2] The rudder keeps a boat upright and keeps it from drifting sideways.

[3] See: Good Vibrations, and The Pali Line: The Four Godly Thoughts

[4] This and the following are the short summaries for each of the four Satipatthanas. See: Satipatthana Resources.
ESSAY: It might pay for those of you who have contacts interested in bi-polar disorder to check out more thoroughly the term: abhijjhádomanassa = coveting/depression. This is a behavior cycle typically interpreted as Manic behavior followed by Depression. If, in stead of seeing the Manic state as a state of energetic effort leading to frenzy, a deeper interpretation is given to it, that is, that it is behavior stimulated by coveting, or intense desire or wanting, a calming of this behavior is suggested in directing the attention to the disadvantages of gain. With the so called Manic side given less power over the resources of the individual, the consequent depression is less severe.

[5] This and the following are the sub-definitions of Samma Vayama, high self control; usually translated right effort. They are the units of another 'category' called The Four High [Right] Efforts.

[6] Iddhipada. For a detailed discussion of the translation and meaning of the following four, see The Four Little Itty-Bddy power-paths.

[7] Samādhi. Usually translated by me as 'highgetting' which does not work well here.
PED: [excerpt, bf added for emphasis]: Samādhi [from saŋ+ā+dhā] 1. concentration; a concentrated, self-collected, intent state of mind and meditation, which, concomitant with right living, is a necessary condition to the attainment of higher wisdom and emancipation. In the Subha-suttanta of the Dīgha (D I.209 sq.) samādhi-khandha ("section on concentration") is the title otherwise given to the cittasampadā, which, in the ascending order of merit accruing from the life of a samaṇa (see Sāmaññaphala-suttanta, and cp. Dial. I.57 sq.) stands between the sīla-sampadā and the paññā-sampadā. In the Ambaṭṭha-sutta the corresponding terms are sīla, caraṇa, vijjā (D. I.100). Thus samādhi would comprise (a) the guarding of the senses (indriyesu gutta-dvāratā), (b) self-possession (sati-sampajañña), (c) contentment (santuṭṭhi), (d) emancipation from the 5 hindrances (nīvaraṇāni), (e) the 4 jhānas.
OED:To draw to a focus; to cause to converge to or as to a focus...That point or position at which an object...may be clear and well-defined. Hence in, or out of focus, lit. and fig. depth of focus (of a lens): the power of giving a 'sharp' image of objects not in the same plane...also, the adjustment (of the eye, or an eyeglass) necessary to produce a clear image.

[8] Indriya = >PED: inda, indu, moon, shine (Latin: idus, middle of the month; Old Irish : eesce, moon) 1. the vedic god Indra; 2. lord, chief, king; (Europeans have found a strange difficulty in understanding the real relation of Sakka to Indra. the few references to Indra in the Nikayas should be classed with the other fragments of Vedic mythology to be found in them. Sakka belongs only to the Buddhist mythology then being built up. He is not only quite different from Indra, but is the direct contrary of that blustering, drunken, god of war.)
Indra = Sakka = Jupiter = Zeus (probably Sakka last)]
PED: belonging to Indra, but in specific Pali sense "belonging to the ruler, i.e. governing, ruling. Indriya is one of the most comprehensive and important categories of Buddhist psychological philosophy and ethics, meaning "controlling principle, directive force . . . (a) with reference to sense-perceptibility "faculty, function", often wrongly interpreted as "organ"; (b) with reference to objective aspects of form and matter "kind, characteristic, determinating principle, sign, mark" (cp. woman-hood, hood = Gothic: haidus "kind, form"); (c) with reference to modes of sensations and (d) to moral powers or motives controlling action, "principle, controlling" force; (e) with reference to cognition and insight "category") Woodward has: "faculties."] of Faith [saddha-]
Remember, Faith in this system is not blind faith, but the confidence in the method that comes from putting it into practice, testing it, and evaluating the results of that testing.
See on this Majjhima Nikaya 151: Becoming Indra

[9] Bala. PED: ... most likely to Lat. De-bilis, without strength; strength, power, force...>able, balance.

[10] Sambojjhanga. For more on this group see The Seventh Lesson

[11] Sammaa di.t.thi; for details on this group, the Ariya Atthangika Magga, see Lesson Eight and the Tenth Lesson]

[12] Woodward adds some text here which I am not sure is justified. His reading of this case is (parentheses his):
 
". . . If, (to attain the form-world, he cultivates the path thereto and) conscious of material quality in his own person, he sees objects external to himself to be limited and fair or foul, and, having mastered them with the thought: I know: I see, is thus conscious (of knowing and seeing, and so enters the musings) ..."
 
He explains in a footnote: " ... They are the Eight Stations of Mastery (Abhibhaayatana = abhibhu + ayatana) ... To elucidate the difficulties of the compressed sentences I have translated and bracketed the parts omitted."
 
I believe he is saying he is including stock phrases included in other expositions of the Eight Stations of Mastery — not material that we can say for certain was mistakenly omitted. In the Digha (D.II.110)(Dialogues II. 118) the text reads the same as here. I suspect he is taking the interpretations made by commentators and translators and filling in the blanks he thinks are there.
 
This set of concepts — The Abhibhaayatana: Lit: the Overbeing Realms; usually translated the Stations of Mastery — is in any case difficult to grasp. I believe this is the case because they are stated from the point of view of one who has attained the level of Mastery at least one level above that level which is being described: in other words, in the case of the first case for example, looking DOWN (so to speak) on the Material world, seeing "one's own" materiality, one sees external material shapes as finite, whether beautiful or ugly, and one is consciously aware and understands what one is seeing. Woodward's "to attain the form-world, he cultivates the path thereto —" is in my view one application of this station of Mastery. In the burnings it is as important to know how to emerge from the "trance" as it is to get into it. To emerge into what we here would call the ordinary world (the Form World) seeing in this way would bring one into line with the way this world is normally seen and would give one the method for re-entry. There are other applications than re-entry, such as not re-entering, but moving higher: having become aware that one is close to re-entry one would be able to renew one's resolve to go higher.]
 
Pali: Ajjhatta.m ruupa-sa~n~nii bahiddhaa rupupaani passati parittaani suva.n.nadubba.n.naani taani abhibhuyya yaanaami passaamii ti eva.m-sa~n~nii hoti —
 
If, beggars, a beggar, perceiving inner [ajjhatta = (PED: that which is personal, subjective, arises from within (in contrast to anything outside, objective or impersonal), interior, personal, inward) I suggest the meaning is understood best when accompanied by a gesture: using the open hand, fingers together, point in toward the heart. Old Pali: a = to; jjha = kkha, (stuff) but usually human and especially to do with the eyes or vijjability; a ta, or at ta = at that, or at it, we say: go at it, or to take, or take up; This -- that has been taken up. Or, the personal, etc.] form, seeing external [bahiddhaa = (PED: outside.) Old Pali: ba = bad; hi = here; again, best understood with an accompanying gesture pointing away] forms as finite [parittaani = (PED: small, little, inferior, insignificant, limited, of no account, trifling -- contrasting with next appamaa.naa, unlimited, boundless, infinite), beautiful or ugly, rising above them [abhibhuyya I take a strong hint from the personification Abhibhu, the Overlord of the realm of non-percipience, essentially being above it all. Abhibhu be ab above. Up above, all is love. Abhibhu be up above "all is love."] thinking [saying to one's self] "I know, I see."

[13] This set refers to the Vimokkhas, the Deliverances. These are often referred to as the Stages of Deliverance. the first of these might seem on a quick glance to be no more than ordinary consciousness. I explain this to myself as being either of two cases: the first is that of the perception that although we all think we are aware of our material selves and the world, in fact very few are, so the recognition of the fact is in fact a stage of deliverance; the second is that it is implied that along with the perception is "knowing and seeing": namely of the changeable, painful, and not-self nature of the material quality of things. Again, in the second stage (as in the above sequences also) the "not perceiving" indicated is not blind unconsciousness, but having achieved a state where no material quality is seen as belonging to the self.]

[14] With some elaboration: If beggars, a beggar, completely transcending perceptions of materiality (rupa), allowing perceptions of repulsion [pa.tigha: PED has repulsion only in the ethical sense, here it is the description of the fact that the material world is "known" as a consequence of the resistance it gives to . . . um. . . pulsion, touch, pushing, contact with what resists; pa.ti is an onomat for "bounce" or "rebound"] to subside [lit. find their own way home], by inattention [amanasikara, again, I point out here, that it is a principle in the attaining of samadhi, or high-getting, that one Let's Go, Gives Up, Abandons (one does not need to Acquire anything: calm, and so forth are the states of having gotten rid of anxiety, etc); Yonisomanasikara, tracing things back to their points of origin has its place: it is the effective tool for eliminating problems such as anger that have arisen due to a lack of guarding the doors of the senses against intrusion by fascinating objects] to perceptions of diversity, thinking "Space is unending!" [ananto aakaaso: "akasa," space, is one of the Six Great Elements. "Unending", of course, is not to be understood in the sense of "unchangeable". Although I do not recall a case where space was used as an example, the Buddha, on occasion uses change in the Four Great Elements in examples of the changeability of things], attains the realm of unending Space and makes a habitat of that. . .

[15] Bhaaveti. Here my personal inclination is to stay "tries" "experiments with", but the commentators will more likely have this as having achieved the degree of mastery over the device which brings about the so-called "reflex image." This is a mental after image of the device which is then refreshed in mind and made more and more vivid to the degree that it provides a bridge between the imagined, and the ordinary real world. At this stage it manifests a variety of uses for the accomplishment of magic powers (for example, the after image of the earth device might be projected on water to enable the power to walk on water). Still, for Pali Buddhists, the primary use of any device should be insight into things as they really are. I can remember at one point using the earth device. I was living in New York (where dirt is somewhat scarce, although filth is plentiful) so I wrote home to request some sifted earth. I made the device according to the specifications. I placed the device in front of my seat at a distance comfortable for viewing, and began to concentrate. Quite a while later I became aware of a scent which was vaguely familiar. Then it occurred to me: I could smell in this earth the odor of the pet cat I had had as a child. the true nature of PATHAVI (Earth, solidity) had been revealed to me!

[16] Apo. A brim full up, preferably blue bowl of water.

[17] Tejo. A screen is made with a circle cut in it and it is placed before a fire so that what one sees is a circle of firelight.

[18] Vayo — wave hand, Hi Ma! That's magic. One concentrates on the motion of leaves in the wind or some such thing.

[19] The color devices are made with bouquets of flowers.

[20] Akasa. A board with a hole in it is placed in the window of an otherwise completely darkened room, one concentrates on the hole. Windows in those days had shutters (in the more well-to-do families), not glass.

[21] Vi~n~naa.na. Here is what makes this series a legitimate Pali practice: the consciousness device is the study of the Dhamma, most specifically those aspects which are included in the fourth Satipatthana. See the Course, Vol II, and Satipatthana Resources.

[22] The next several, although of a different nature than the previous, are also meditation devices. . . maybe better to say "subjects of meditation". Still to be used to develop concentration, they are more conducive to the development of insight into the painful nature of things.

[23] Repititions here are in the text and look like they represent factors of a different categorization or path.

[24] From: PTS: Woodward, trans: Kindred Sayings V: Kindred Sayings on the Limbs of wisdom: In-Breathing and Out-Breathing: i. the skeleton: II. Realization or No Return, pp110
Monks, from the cultivation and making much of the idea of the skeleton, of two fruits one may be looked for even in this very life, to wit: realization or, if there be any substrate left, the state of non-return.
How should it be cultivated, monks, how should it be made much of that one may expect these fruits?
Herein a monk cultivates the limb of wisdom that is mindfulness, accompanied by the idea of the skeleton . . . the limb of wisdom that is equanimity, so accompanied, that is based on seclusion, on dispassion, on cessation, that ends in self-surrender.
If the idea of the skeleton be thus cultivated . . .
III. Great Benefit
Monks, the idea of the skeleton, if cultivated and made much of, conduces to great benefit. . . . How should it be cultivated? . . . Herein . . . non-return.
IV. Great Peace from Bondage . . . same
V. A Great Thrill . . . same
VI. Great Pleasantness of Living . . .
and the sequence is repeated for the ideas in the next few suttas of the Ones: the Discoloured corpse, the Fissured corpse, the Inflated corpse, Goodwill, Compassion, Sympathy, Equanimity, and Inbreathing and Outbreathing (all Woodward's terms)

[25] For the series dealing with the perception of corpses in various stages of decay, see: The Charnal Field

[26] Buddhanussatim. The next group is known as the Six Anussatis. The standard translations use the terms "mindfulness", "recollection" etc, intending the meaning to be "bringing to mind and thinking about".


Index to Anguttara Nikaya I: The Ekanipata Suttas ]

 


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