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Saɱyutta Nikāya
IV. Saḷāyatana Vagga
35: Saḷāyatana Saɱyutta
Paññāsa Catutthaɱ
4. Āsīvisa Vagga

The Book of the Kindred Sayings
IV. Kindred Sayings on the 'Six-Fold Sphere' of Sense and Other Subjects
35: Kindred Sayings the Sixfold Sphere of Sense The 'Fourth Fifty' Suttas
4. The Chapter on the Snake

Sutta 202

Avassuta-Pariyāya Suttaɱ

Lustful[1]

Translated by F. L. Woodward
Edited by Mrs. Rhys Davids

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[182] [116]

[1][than][bodh]Thus have I heard:

Once the Exalted One was staying among the Sakyans,[2]
near Kapilavatthu,
in the Banyan Park.

Now at that time there was a newly built mote-hall[3]
of the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu,
not long made,
never yet dwelt in
by recluse
or brahmin
or any other human being.

Then the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu
came to visit the Exalted One,
and on coming to him
they saluted him
and sat down at one side.

So seated
they said to the Exalted One: -

"Here, lord, is a newly built mote-hall
of the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu,
not long made,
never yet dwelt in
by recluse
or brahmin
or any other human being.

Let our lord, the Exalted One,
be the first to make use of it.

When the Exalted One has first made use of it,
afterwards the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu will use it.

That shall be for the profit and welfare
of the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu
for many a long day."

The Exalted One assented by silence.

Then the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu,
seeing the consent of the Exalted One,
saluted him by the right
and went away to the [117] new mote-hall.

Having got it ready in every way,
having appointed seats,
set a waterpot
and hung up an oil-lamp,[4]
they went to the Exalted One,
and on coming to him they said: -

"All ready, lord, is the mote-hall.

Seats are appointed.

A waterpot is set.

An oil-lamp is hung.

Let the Exalted One now do what seems good to him."

Then the Exalted One robed himself,
and taking outer robe and bowl
went along with a great company of brethren
to the new mote-hall.

In the Mote-hall

On reaching it
he had his feet washed,[5]
entered the mote-hall
and sat down against the middle pillar,
facing the east.

The Order of Brethren also had their feet washed,
entered the mote-hall
and sat down against the western wall,
also facing east,
with the Exalted One in front of them.

Then the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu also,
having had their feet washed,
entered the mote-hall
and sat down against the eastern wall,
having the Exalted One in front of them.

Then the Exalted One taught the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu
with a pious talk[6]
till far into the night,
established them,
roused
and made them happy.

Then he dismissed them with these words:

"The night is far spent, Gotamas.[7]

Do ye now what seems good to you."

"It is well, lord,"
said the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu
in obedience to the Exalted One.

And they rose up,
saluted the Exalted One by the right
and went away.

 


 

Now not long after the departure of the Sakyans of Kapilavatthu
the Exalted One said to the venerable Moggallāna the Great: -

"Moggallāna, the Order of Brethren
is now freed of sloth [118] and torpor.[8]

Bethink thee, Moggallāna,
of a pious talk to the Order of Brethren.

My back is aching.

I will stretch it.

"Very well, lord," replied the venerable Moggallāna the Great
to the Exalted One.

"...on his right side." He is now facing the bhikkhus. But how was Moggallāna seated? Did he turn around to face the bhikkhus as he taught, thereby sitting with his back to the Buddha? Not likely. Perhaps far enough to the side to make turning unnecessary. And what would those bhikkhus do who were by this change now seated directly in front of the Buddha? Also a no-no. More likely in the original seating there was a gap left in the ranks of the bhikkhus so that they sat to the sides of the central piller.

p.p. explains it all — p.p.

Then the Exalted One had his robe folded into four
and lay down on his right side
in the lion-posture,
putting one foot on the other,
collected and composed,
with his mind set on rising up again.

Thereupon the venerable Moggallāna the Great addressed the Brethren,
saying:

"Friends."

"Yes, friend," replied those brethren
to the venerable Moggallāna the Great.

The venerable Moggallāna the Great then said: -

"Friends, I will teach you the way[9] of lusting
and also of not lusting.

Do ye apply your ininds carefully
and I will speak."

"Very good, friend,"
replied those brethren to the venerable Moggallāna the Great,
who then said: -

"And how, friends, is one lustful?

Herein, friends, a brother,
seeing an object with the eye,
feels attachment for objects that charm,
feels aversion from objects that displease,
abides with attention to body distracted,[10]
and his thoughts are mean.[11]

He realizes not,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
hearing a sound with the ear,
feels attachment for sounds that charm,
feels aversion from sounds that displease,
abides with attention to body distracted,
and his thoughts are mean.

He realizes not,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
smelling a scent with the nose,
feels attachment for scents that charm,
feels aversion from scents that displease,
abides with attention to body distracted,
and his thoughts are mean.

He realizes not,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
tasting a savour with the tongue,
feels attachment for savours that charm,
feels aversion from savours that displease,
abides with attention to body distracted,
and his thoughts are mean.

He realizes not,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
contacting a tangible with the body,
feels attachment for tangibles that charm,
feels aversion from tangibles that displease,
abides with attention to body distracted,
and his thoughts are mean.

He realizes not,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
cognizing a mind-state with the mind,
feels attachment for mind-states that charm,
feels aversion from mind-states that displease,
abides with attention to body distracted,
and his thoughts are mean.

He realizes not,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
cease without remainder.

This brother, friends, is called
'lustful after objects cognizable by the eye,
'lustful after sounds cognizable by the ear,
'lustful after scents cognizable by the nose,
'lustful after savours cognizable by the tongue,
'lustful after tangibles cognizable by the body,
'lustful after mind-states cognizable by the mind.

When a brother so abides, friends,
if Māra[12] come upon him by way of the eye,
Māra gets access,[ed1]
Māra gets an opportunity.

If [119] Māra come upon him by way of the ear,
Māra gets an opportunity.[13]

If Māra come upon him by way of the nose,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the tongue,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the body,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the mind,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

Suppose, friends, a shed
thatched with reeds
or grass,
dry and sapless,
more than a season old.

Then if a man comes upon it from the eastern quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get access,
the fixe would get opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from the western quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get access,
the fixe would get opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from the northern quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get access,
the fixe would get opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from the southern quarter quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get access,
the fixe would get opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from below
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get access,
the fixe would get opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from above, - from whatever side
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get access,
the fixe would get opportunity.

Even so, friends, when a brother so abides,
if Māra come upon him by way of the eye,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the ear,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the nose,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the tongue,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the body,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the mind,
Māra gets access,
Māra gets an opportunity.

So dwelling, friends,
objects overcome a brother,
a brother overcomes not objects.

Sounds overcome a brother,
a brother overcomes not sounds.

Scents overcome a brother,
a brother overcomes not scents.

Savours overcome a brother,
a brother overcomes not savours.

Tangibles overcome a brother,
a brother overcomes not tangibles.

Mind-states overcome a brother,
a brother overcomes mind-states.

This brother, friends, is called
'conquered by objects,
conquered by sounds,
conquered by scents,
conquered by savours,
conquered by tangibles,
conquered by mind-states
not conqueror of them.'

Conquered,
not conquering,[ed2]
evil, unprofitable states,
passion-fraught,
leading to rebirth overcome him,
states unhappy,
whose fruit is pain,
whose future is rebirth,
decay
and death.

Thus, friends, one is lustful.

 


 

And how, friends, is one free from lust?

Herein, friends, a brother,
seeing an object with the eye,
is not attached to objects that charm
nor averse from objects that displease.

He abides with attention to body settled,
and his thoughts are boundless.

He realizes,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
come to cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
hearing a sound with the ear,
is not attached to sounds that charm,
nor averse from sounds that displease.

He abides with attention to body settled,
and his thoughts are boundless.

He realizes,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
come to cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
smelling a scent with the nose,
is not attached to scents that charm,
nor averse from scents that displease.

He abides with attention to body settled,
and his thoughts are boundless.

He realizes,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
come to cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
tasting a savour with the tongue,
is not attached to savours that charm,
nor averse from savours that displease.

He abides with attention to body settled,
and his thoughts are boundless.

He realizes,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
come to cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
contacting a tangible with the body,
is not attached to tangibles that charm,
nor averse from tangibles that displease.

He abides with attention to body settled,
and his thoughts are boundless.

He realizes,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
come to cease without remainder.

Herein, friends, a brother,
cognizing a mind-state with the mind,
is not attached to mind-states that charm,
nor averse from mind-states that displease.

[120] He abides with attention to body fixed,
and his thoughts are boundless.

He realizes,
in its true nature,
that emancipation of heart,
that emancipation of wisdom,
wherein those evil,
unprofitable states that have arisen
come to cease without remainder.

This brother, friends, is called
'not lustful after objects cognizable by the eye,
'not lustful after sounds cognizable by the ear,
'not lustful after scents cognizable by the nose,
'not lustful after savours cognizable by the tongue,
'not lustful after tangibles cognizable by the body,
'not lustful after mind-states cognizable by the mind.

When a brother so abides, friends,
if Māra come upon him by way of the eye,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the ear,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the nose,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the tongue,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the body,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the mind,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

Suppose, friends, a house or hall
with peaked gable,
built of thick clay,
newly plastered.[14]

Then if a man comes upon it from the eastern quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get no access,
get no opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from the western quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get no access,
get no opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from the northern quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get no access,
get no opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from the southern quarter quarter
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get no access,
get no opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from below
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get no access,
get no opportunity.

If a man comes upon it from above, - from whatever side
with a bundle of blazing grass,
the fire would get no access,
get no opportunity.

Even so, friends, when a brother so abides,
if Māra come upon him by way of the eye,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the ear,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the nose,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the tongue,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the body,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

If Māra come upon him by way of the mind,
Māra gets no access,
Māra gets no opportunity.

Moreover, friends, so dwelling,
a brother conquers objects,
objects do not conquer him;

a brother conquers sounds,
sounds do not conquer him;

a brother conquers scents,
scents do not conquer him;

a brother conquers savours,
savours do not conquer him;

a brother conquers tangibles,
tangibles do not conquer him;

a brother conquers mind-states,
mind-states do not conquer him.

This brother, friends, is called
'conqueror of objects,
conqueror of sounds,
conqueror of scents,
conqueror of savours,
conqueror of tangibles,
conqueror of mind-states
not conquered by them.'

He conquers those evil,
unprofitable states,
passion-fraught,
inciting to lust,
leading to rebirth,
states unhappy,
whose fruit is pain,
rebirth,
decay
and death.

Thus, friends, is one free from lust."

 


 

Thereupon the Exalted One rose up
and said to the venerable Moggallāna the Great: -

"Well said! Well said, Moggallāna!

Well indeed have you spoken to the brethren
of the way of lustfulness
and the way of not lusting."

Thus spake the venerable Moggallāna the Great and the xxxv, iv, 5, § 203] Kindred Sayings on Sense 121 Master was approving of his words, and those brethren were delighted and took pleasure in what was said by the venerable Moggallāna the Great.

 


[1] Avassuta, lit. 'leaky.'

[2] The Buddha's own clan. Cf. K.S. i, 36, iii, 77.

[3] Santhāgāraŋ This introductory part occurs at M. i, 353 Cf. Buddhist India, 20. The word is defined here and at D.A. 1, 256 as 'royal muster-hall' (evaŋ santhaŋ karonti, mariyādānaŋ bandhanti: rājāno tattha sambhavantī ti). The description of this hall is given at groat length by Comy., and is to bo found in substance at Ud.A. 400. The same words are used at D. iii, 201) (Dialog. iii, 201) to describe the mote-hall of the Pavā Mallas

[4] 'Seats,' of course, are mats, except for the teacher, who sits on a chair on a dais. The waterpot is at the door for foot-washmg. The oil-lamp is for the night's bana-preaching. These customs are still strictly followed in Ceylon.

[5] The method of rinsing the feet on entering a house is described at Vin. ii, 8. Nowadays in Ceylon this is done for each bhikkhu by a dāyaka, or supporter, while another wipes the feet with a cloth.

[6] Comy. calls this pakiṇṇaka (miscellaneous).

[7] Speaking to his brother clansmen he thus addresses them by the name of their clan. Two watches of the night had passed. Comy.

[8] Thīnaɱmiddha, usually one of the hindrances to progress. Here, says Comy., after sitting for two watches they were in a condition to listen more attentively.

[9] Pariyāya, 'method,' also 'teaching.' Comy. kāraṇaŋ.

[10] Supra, § 132. Here kāya is omitted.

[11] Paritta-cetaso, as opposed toappamāṇa-c. below.

[12] Māra. Comy. kilesa-Māro pi devaputta-Māro pi.

[13] Otāraŋ, ārammaṇaŋ. Cf. S. ii, 268, etc. Comy. vivaraŋ, paccayaŋ.

[14] Addāvdlepanā. Cf. M. i, 86.

 


[ed1] Woodward omits this clause, but includes it in the next section.

[ed2] Woodward omits the first two words here.


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