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2021

newWhat's New?

The content of this site is available in two locations:
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Disposition of BuddhaDust
The site is intended to be adopted by those interested in making the Dhamma their theme for meditation and for Dhamma researchers of all stripes. It is intended as a pattern, to be used as a basis for a personal desktop work environment or as a basis for promoting some view on the web, and should be seen as incomplete, needing correction, revision and improvement in all departments.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.23.21] Tuesday, February 23, 2021 7:31 AM

Cogito, ergo sum[1]
— René Descartes "Je pense, donc je suis" in Discourse on the Method

"It would be much better if I could only stop thinking. Thoughts are the dullest things. Duller than flesh. They stretch out and there's no end to them and they leave a funny taste in the mouth. ... It goes, it goes ... and there's no end to it. It's worse than the rest because I feel responsible and have complicity in it. For example, this sort of painful rumination: I exist, I am the one who keeps it up. I. ... I am the one who continues it, unrolls it. I exist. How serpentine is this feeling of existing — I unwind it, slowly. ... If I could keep myself from thinking! I try, and succeed: my head seems to fill with smoke ... and then it starts again: "Smoke ... not to think ... don't want to think ... I think I don't want to think. I mustn't think that I don't want to think. Because that's still a thought." Will there never be an end to it?"

— Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea, New Directions, N.Y. 1952; translated from the French, La Nausée, by Lloyd Alexander, First published in 1938 by Librairie Gallimard, Paris

 


[1] Usually translated "I think, therefore I am" for Buddhists it is better translated "I think therefore I exist," and that to be understood as meaning that in thinking one projects the (mistaken) idea of 'self' into future existence. To take 'thinking' as the self is the same sort of error as is being made in taking the body or sense-experience, or perception, or own-making or consciousness as the self.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.21.21] Sunday, February 21, 2021 2:53 PM

Iti 1-112 Itivuttaka: The Buddha's Sayings, the John D. Ireland translation. Includes an Introduction and the footnotes.
All (112 suttas) in one file; each sutta is linked to its Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
A collection of short sayings grouped by the number of concepts dealt with.
From DPPN: The fourth book of the Kuddaka Nikāya, containing 112 Suttas, each of which begins with the words: Vuttaṃ h'etaṃ Bhagavatā vuttam-arahatā ti me sutaṃ. According to Dhammapāla, the suttas were preached from time to time by the Buddha to Khujjuttarā at Kosambī. She then repeated them to the five hundred women of Udena's palace, chief of whom was Sāmāvatī. In order to emphasise to her audience the fact that she was repeating the Buddha's words and not her own, she prefaced each sutta with the phrase quoted above. There was no need to describe any special circumstances in which the suttas were preached, because they were familiar to Khujjuttarā's audience. At the Rājagaha Council, Ānanda repeated the suttas to the Assembly and they were gathered into this collection.
I do not see any problems with any of these suttas. Rather than spend a lot of time and energy debating whether this was an early addition to the main body of suttas or whether it was earlier than that, I suggest taking these suttas a confirmation of the Dhamma within the suttas.


I have put this up in other translations many times before, but it needs repeating:

"Bhikkhus, I say that for an individual who transgresses in one thing, there is no evil deed whatsoever he would not do. What is that one thing? It is this, bhikkhus: deliberately telling a lie."

—The Itivuttaka: 1.21-Ireland translation.

"Bhikkhus, this holy life is not lived for the sake of deceiving people, for the sake of cajoling people, for the sake of profiting in gain, honour, and fame, nor with the idea, 'Let people know me thus.' This holy life, bhikkhus, is lived for the sake of restraint and abandoning."

—Iti 2.8-Ireland translation.

"Bhikkhus, possessing two things a bhikkhu lives here and now with much pleasure and happiness and is properly motivated for the destruction of the taints. What are the two things? Being moved by a sense of urgency on occasions for urgency, and, being moved, making a proper endeavour. These, bhikkhus, are the two things, possessing which, a bhikkhu lives here and now with much pleasure and happiness and is properly motivated for the destruction of the taints."

—Iti 2.10-Ireland translation.

The question here is then: "What is proper endeavour?"

When the Buddha speaks of making great effort what he is saying is master your willpower to let go where it is difficult to do so. You are sitting trying to develop calm and a memory of the most beautiful lass in the land makes its presence known. The effort there is to distance yourself from interest in this thought. It is not a matter of doing, but of not doing, in this case not paying attention, inattention.
Bad conditions are things that you are 'doing' that cause problems; good conditions are the absence of bad conditions. So the thing you want to see is how it is not productive of good conditions to be 'doing'.

The exceptions to this are activities at the beginning, the setting-up of practice, and those that, once set up (e.g., giving, mindfulness, knowledge of Dhamma; engendering enthusiasm (pīti)) are either things that once set up arise without intent, are matters of memory, or are done with the intent to bring kamma to an end. The experience of the individual practitioner up to the point of Arahantship will be a mixed bag, but that which effects Arahantship is always a matter of not-doing. How could escape from kamma be doing?

"There are, bhikkhus, two successive Dhamma-teachings of the Tathāgata, the Arahant, the Fully Enlightened One. What are the two? 'See evil as evil' — this is the first Dhamma-teaching. 'Having seen evil as evil, be rid of it, be detached from it, be freed from it' — this is the second Dhamma-teaching. These, bhikkhus, are the two successive Dhamma-teachings of the Tathāgata, the Arahant, the Fully Enlightened One."

—Iti 2.12-Ireland translation.

"For one knowing and seeing, bhikkhus, I say there is the destruction of the taints, not for one not knowing and not seeing. But for one knowing what, seeing what, is there the destruction of the taints? For one knowing and seeing, 'This is suffering,' there is the destruction of the taints. For one knowing and seeing, 'This is the origin of suffering' there is the destruction of the taints. For one knowing and seeing, 'This is the cessation of suffering' there is the destruction of the taints. For one knowing and seeing, 'This is the course leading to the cessation of suffering,' there is the destruction of the taints. Thus it is, bhikkhus, that for one knowing and seeing there is the destruction of the taints."

—Iti 4.3-Ireland translation.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.18.21] Thursday, February 18, 2021 6:41 AM

[AN 4 90] Aggregates, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
Gotama takes the names commonly given at the time to various sorts of shaman and re-defines them in terms of his Dhamma.

If the four previous suttas were intended to be taken together as a puzzle, there seem to be errors in Blue-Lotus 1 and White-Lotus 1. Both should have been that 'he weakened the asavas', not destroyed them. The releases are attainable by even the Streamwinner but still there is a distinction there that would make the relationship rational. Then all four groups would have the structure: Streamwinner, Once Returner, Non-returner, Arahant. Blue Lotus 3 could be experiencing temporary release. Otherwise perhaps Woodward's speculation that the first group only was original and the others made up (carelessly) to form the usual group of four pairs of men (those on the four paths). Or there is also the (doubtful) possibility that there was no intention of making the four sets parallel each other.
Then there is the problem with the translation of 'appattamānaso' (appatta-mānaso) in the situation in Immovable Shaman 4. Woodward translates: 'has not made up his mind', Bhk. Bodhi: 'has not attained his mind's ideal'. Both of these appear to me at least as highly shakable. I sugest taking the word back a step: appa pa atta māmaso 'a little past mastering his mind'. Or 'mastering the mind' could be understood as a higher state than the certainty of attaining the goal of the Streamwinner. To be 'unshakable' he must have got at least this far.
Bhk. Bodhi argues from an assumption that Blue-Lotus 1 and White-Lotus 1 are correct that there appears to be a weakening of the standards for Arahantship involved. It could be that or it could be an error in the understanding of the situation on the part of the commentator or as I suggest, an error in the recollection of the sutta.

 

Samaṇa-m-acalo
The Immovable Shaman
Samaṇapuṇṭarīko
The Blue-lotus Shaman
Samaṇapadumo
The White-lotus Shaman
Samaṇesu samaṇasukhumālo
The Sweet-faced Shaman among Shaman
1 He aspires to the goal of ultimate release. He has destroyed the āsavas; is released in heart, released by wisdom; but does not attain the eight releases. He has destroyed the āsavas; is released in heart, released by wisdom; and does abide in the eight releases He receives the necessities, good health, and good will when desired and not when not desired; he attains the jhānas; has destroyed the āsavas; and is released in heart, released by wisdom.
2 He has broken the three saṅyojana and has become a Streamwinner He has broken the three saṅyojana and warn down lust, hate and stupidity and has become a Once-Returner. He has completely destroyed the five yokes to lower births will re-appear where he will attain Arahantship without returning to this world. He has destroyed the āsavas; is released in heart, released by wisdom
3 He lives following the eight dimensional way [not so named] He lives following the ten dimensional way [not so named] He lives following the ten dimensional way [not so named] and abides in the eight releases He receives the necessities, good health, and good will when desired and not when not desired; he attains the jhānas; has destroyed the āsavas; and is released in heart, released by wisdom.
4 He is a little developed in mind and aspires to the goal of ultimate release. He lives observing the appearance and disappearance of the stockpiles, but does not experience the releases. He lives observing the appearance and disappearance of the stockpiles, but does experience the releases. He receives the necessities, good health, and good will when desired and not when not desired; he attains the jhānas; has destroyed the āsavas; and is released in heart, released by wisdom.

[DN 34] Progressing by Tens, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the T.W. and C.A.F. Rhys-Davids translation, and the Olds translation.
This sutta is very similar to DN 33 in that it is a catalog of various units of the Dhamma organized by way of the number of items in the unit. It becomes a form of mental gymnastics by imposing on the structure that it be limited to ten sets fit within 10 specific concepts: — so that section 1 is 10 units of one item each, each dealing with concepts 1-10; the second is 10 units of 2 items each, each dealing with concepts 1-10; on up to 10 units of 10 items each, each dealing with concepts 1-10.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.17.21] Wednesday, February 17, 2021 1:46 PM

[DN 33] The Discourse for Reciting Together, The Bhikkkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Rhys Davids, T. and C. translation, the Walshe translation, and the Olds translation.
An extensive categorization of all the main ideas in the Buddha's system grouped by the number of concepts covered.
An excellent translation with which to acquaint yourself with the vocabularies of the translators.
[AN 3.118] [DTO #121] Purities (1), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
The Buddha describes purity of body, speech and mind.
[AN 3.119] [DTO #122] Purities (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
The Buddha describes purity of body, speech and mind. A variation on the previous sutta. Purity of mind is in this sutta given as awareness of the Nivaranas (Diversions). Note that it is the presentation given here that is likely the source for it's presentation in the Satipatthana Sutta.
[AN 4 87] The Son, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
Gotama takes the names commonly given at the time to various sorts of shaman and re-defines them in terms of his Dhamma.
[AN 4 88] Fetters, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
Gotama takes the names commonly given at the time to various sorts of shaman and re-defines them in terms of his Dhamma.
[AN 4 89] View, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
Gotama takes the names commonly given at the time to various sorts of shaman and re-defines them in terms of his Dhamma.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.16.21] Tuesday, February 16, 2021 8:33 AM

Links to Audio files have been added to ped.htm in the section titled The Pāḷi Alphabet and to the dividers between letters, e.g., "A".

Please note that this .htm file is the only file I will be making continuous changes to; I will only be upgrading the other PED files on the site occasionally as most of what I will be adding is frippery like this.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.15.21] Monday, February 15, 2021 9:43 AM

Nagualism an article going into some detail on the subject of Nagualism. Attached to the discussion 'Don Juan's Table'.
A scholarly article, but a prime example of the sort of study that Don Juan would give his 'bemused scorn'. It is filled with speculations mostly backed up by the completely mad speculations (couched in terms of absolute certainty) of the Catholic priests and others of the time and mental set of the Conquest. The result is that it goes no further back than the Conquest.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.13.21] Saturday, February 13, 2021 5:58 AM
Also posted in the Come Beggar! section of the Forum.

From Time to Time

Evaluating Progress

It is natural to want to know where one stands with regard to achieving the goal. The Buddha suggests that 'from time to time' one should evaluate other's progress, and 'from time to time' one should evaluate one's own progress.[1]

In this matter it becomes very important to remember that this is a system which in it's highest form rests on intentional not-doing and letting go. That means that you do not evaluate your progress by measuring how close you are to the goal, but how much of the world you have left behind.

Think about it! At best all you know about the goal before you have realized it for yourself, is the idea of freedom. Thinking in this direction you can say: I can see I am not yet free. That will be the case whether you are near or far.

What you can know that will help you judge your progress is how much of that great pile of habits you have you have managed to eliminate. That is the important factor. Take a look at how much you have changed; focus on those turning points which were a result of having seen your behavior as self-destructive.

Evaluating the progress of others in the same way will help you by way of making you conscious of impediments to freedom you might not have thought of or which are hard to see in yourself, but easy to see in others.

Reflect: "Does this that I see as a fault in this person also exist in me?"

Bottom line? This evaluation should concern itself with the yokes to rebirth:

[1] Is there here any idea that this body is my body? Belongs to me? Is under my control? Can be done with as I please? Do I think of it in terms of "I" "Me" "Mine"? See this with your intuitive wisdom: draw inferences from grasping or protective behavior, anger when things do not go as one would wish, etc. Is there at least an intellectual understanding of the idea that a thing that changes and is out of one's control cannot belong to the self?

[2] Is there here evidence of doubts about the Buddha, the Dhamma, the Sangha? Did the Buddha actually find a way out? Is this just another BS Dhamma hussle? Did he teach Dhamma such that one who follows the instructions can realize the goal for himself? Is the Great Saṅgha (Streamwinners, Once-Returners, Non-Returners, Arahants) a good description of the stages to awakening? A good example of walking the walk? You can judge partly by how far you have left painful behaviors behind; that much is a sound basis for faith. "I followed the instructions this far and this far they worked as described." You will have unshakable faith when you have seen for yourself: "All that which comes to be, comes to an end."

[3] Do I rely on good deeds, ethical conduct, and hocus pocus as being the way to the end of pain? Is there here a substitution of giving and scrupulous ethical conduct for self-discipline and mental development? Is there reliance on chanting, insense, candles, statues, amulets prayers, spells and wishes and other magic charms?

[4] To what degree have I let go of wishing to experience pleasures bound to the senses? Abandon all hope ye who enter here! Is there here evidence of ambitions? "I just want to accomplish ... before I die." "I'm not ready yet! I have more to do on my website!" Or just hankering after a good meal? It isn't all over once you have let go of sex! Have you let go of sex? Do you identify as a homosexual? transsexual? bisexual? That is a pretty clear sign that your orientation is not free from sexuality.

[5] Has contrary behavior (smart-ass going the wrong direction just to be difficult)? Behaviors like lies, boasting and braging, cruelty and even harm? Watch yourself carefully! What do you think all your Satipatthana practice is for? Do you whole-heartedly believe in the goal while doing everything that will prevent it from coming to be? Conflicted behaviors tell you what is going on on other levels of consciousness; you need to pay attention.

[6] To what degree have I let go of wishing to experience pleasures bound to material things? This is primarily desire for rebirth in some material world. The nostalgia for this world; for living in this world; to enjoy the comradery of man. Etc. Ambition to attain worldly gains; wealth, power. Secondarily it is ambition to be reborn in some heavenly state

[7] To what degree have I let go of wishing to experience pleasures bound to immaterial things? It is necessary to keep your interest in accomplishing the goal to the point where it has been accomplished. That is only a problem when you have reached the goal. Meanwhile what is a problem is desire for fame, magic powers, attaining jhāna, attaining one or another of the paths, wanting to amount to something, wanting to bring others into this system (it is the wanting that is the problem in this case; in this case just teach and let go of the desire to have helped (and the secret prideful dwelling on having helped) the wanting to make a difference in the world. Etc.

[8] Is there here evidence of unconquered pride? Looking down on others. Being a pompus ass. Striking attitudes and holding opinions.

[9] Has fear been faced here? Or is there evidence of avoiding the winds in the upper atmosphere? Here careless behavior points to un-recognized fears. A person who lies to keep control of his situation, never listens to others, one who can never be wrong is a person riddled with fear. A person that can admit to errors, listen carefully to others, abstain from saying what is not true is confident.

[10] Is there here evidence of having seen (not just understood) the Four Truths?

[1] AN 8.8

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.10.21] Wednesday, February 10, 2021 6:32 AM

[MN 22] The Snake Simile, the M. Olds translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Lord Chalmers translation, the Horner translation, the Bhk. Thanissaro translation, the Ñanamoli Thera/Bhk. Bodhi translation, the Sister Upalavanna translation, and the Nyanaponika Thera translation.
A wide-ranging very famous sutta that begins with a forceful teaching on the dangers of indulgence in sense pleasures. This sutta contains two famous similies: the similie of the snake illustrating how a wrong grasp of the Dhamma is like taking hold of a poisonous snake from the wrong end; and the simile of the raft illustrating how the Dhamma should be used to attain it's ends and then be let go. The sutta concludes with a thorough examination of the way 'not self' should be considered.
The interesting question here is why would Arittha hang on so stubbornly to his view about the harmlessness of sense-pleasure indulgence? It is possible of course that he was just a fool (but he was not unskilled in meditation, see: SN 5.54.6 where Gotama thought enough of him to give him special instruction on the in-and-out-breathing practice). But the likelihood is that he was trapped by a perception that befalls one who holds the view that there is no self. In this view a number of very dangerous conclusions can be reached because there is perceived to be no individuality there to experience the consequences of deeds. This would justify the simile of the snake and would explain the long dissertation that follows concerning the 'not-self' position. The presence here of the simile of the raft might also be explained as a hint to Arittha that if even the Dhamma could be let go, he could certainly let go his view.

 


 

Oblog: [O.2.07.21] Sunday, February 07, 2021 6:29 AM

Significant error in the most error-free Pali Dictionary: On page 396, from Pāli to Pālissuta the 'ā's should be changed to 'a's.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.31.21] Sunday, January 31, 2021 8:10 AM

[VP SV 1.01] Book of the Discipline, Vol. 1, Sutta-Vibhaṅga, Defeat 1, the Horner translation.
Linked to the Pali.
This is a monster of a sutta! The translation has been fully rolled out and proofread. It is clear from the rolled-out version that it consists of numerous strata. There is nothing in the stratification which invalidates the message, but about the only thing that remains as likely originally spoken by Gotama is his initial definition of the rule and the first exception. The rest is lawyer-speak and some padding at the beginning.
This translation is not Ms. Horner's finest work. It looks like she has taken each paragraph as a separate entity without reference to its immediate context. While the disjointedness is subtle, it is felt. And then there is the famous fact that she has censored some of the content. The censored content has been restored from a document supplied by the PTS and what do we find? A horror at the very idea of sex. Some stuff nobody today would give a second thought ... well, ok, maybe having a■■■ ■■x with yourself or with a decomposed animal is a little too much, but these descriptions are not pornographic, they are legalistic and to not make that distinction shows a defect in her reasoning (which is, presumably, to protect innocents from being stimulated to such things by the description of them ... little does she know, apparently, what gets discussed (has always been discussed) in college dorms). Maybe her generation was way too up tight or maybe our generation is way too caught up in lust. Who knows? Maybe both.
Finally, please note that the Pali here has been given only the most superficial look-see. My proofreading days are apparently over. I can no longer focus on the hard copy. Except that I would highly recommend that all the Pali and Translations here be given another proofing, there is currently on the site a fairly clean set of both the Pali and Translations that should serve anyone who is sincerly motivated to learn.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.19.21] Sunday, January 24, 2021 7:38 AM

Two new versions of the PTS PED Upgrade:

ped-stand-alone.zip 2.2MB This version has an internal style sheet and all images have been removed. Works on installation, no editing necessary.
ped.utf8-stripped.zip This version of the text file contains only the title page and the word listings; no introductory materials.

All the links to the various versions of this PED are permanently located on the Index of Downloads page under the listing for the available PTS works.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.19.21] Tuesday, January 19, 2021 8:59 AM

"Mendicant," literally "a beggar for alms," from mendicare, to beg, mendicus, "a beggar," is also doubtless etymologically correct as a translation of bhikkhu. — Ms. Horner from her Translator's Introducion to the Book of the Discipline, Volume I, Sutta Vibhaṅga, page xl.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.16.21] Saturday, January 16, 2021 4:09 AM

[SN 2.15.10] Person, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that the pile of a single person's bones during only one aeon would be greater than a huge mountain. ... if there were a collector of such bones, and if the collection were not destroyed.
[SN 2.16.11] The Robe, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Maha Kassapa criticizes Ananda for going around with a great crowd of novices and relates the story of his first encounter with the Buddha, his exchanging robes with the Buddha and the Buddha's high praise of him.
[SN 3.22.18] Cause (1), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha teaches the understanding that a thing built on the changeable is itself subject to change.
See Glossology: 'hetu', for a discussion as to why this term should not be being translated 'cause' as per Woodward and most other translators.
[SN 3.22.19] Cause (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha teaches the understanding that a thing built of the painful does not result in the pleasant.
[SN 3.22.20] Cause (3), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha teaches the understanding that a thing built of the not-self does not become a self.
The BJT Pali has apparently used copy and paste but forgot to make the appropriate changes. Woodward does a similar thing in not making the appropriate changes in the second and third of the previous three. The PTS Pali is correct although abridged; I have unabridged the Pali and corrected the Woodward.
[SN 3.22.76] Arahants, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha teaches that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are inconstant, that what is inconstant is painful, that what is painful is not the self and that such things should be regarded as 'not mine', not the self.
NOTE: This sutta concludes with a statement that among beings up to the highest of those who have become, Arahanship is the culmination and mastery. This is translated in a misleading way such as to indicate that Arahantship is to be included as one of the 'becomings.' I suppose that if one keeps in mind the fact that the body is not the self, then it is possible to think of the Arahant whose body has not yet died as 'having become', but the reality is that the Arahant has stopped becoming (there is a separation there between the consciousness of the Arahant and the body he used to identify with) and it is for that that such a one is considered the highest in the world of those who have existence. Woodward has mistranslated 'sattavasa' as 'the seven abodes.' This is 'being's vestments', or 'abodes of beings', and there are nine of such.
[SN 3.22.78] The Lion, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha compairs the effect of the teaching of the Dhamma on gods and men to the effect of the lion's roar on the creatures of the forest.
[SN 3.22.82] The Full-moon Night, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha delivers a comprehensive discourse on the fuel stockpiles, the 'panc-upadana-kkhandha'.
Here is a really good example of how the Dhamma was propagated among the bhikkhus. Together with his five hundred pupils, face-to-face with the Buddha, a group teacher asks a series of questions which when answered by the Buddha elucidate the entire spectrum of doctrines concerning the 'pañc-upādāna-kkhandhā,' the five fuel-stockpiles. Completely blurred over by abridgment.
[SN 3.22.96] Cow Dung, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not, and then he is shown by way of example, a past life of Gotama where he was a king of extraordinary wealth and splendor and yet all that wealth and splendor has disappeared.
[SN 3.23.001] Mortality, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Venerable Rādha asks about the extent of that which is subject to mortality and the value of seeing it the way described by the Buddha.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.15.21] Friday, January 15, 2021 4:31 AM

[SN 1.3.21] Persons, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
The Buddha teaches King Pasenadi how to classify people into four types: One who goes from darkness to darkness; one who goes from darkness to the light; one who goes from the light to the dark; and one who goes from the light to the light.
[SN 1.3.22] Grandmother, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
King Pasenadi visits the Buddha after his grandmother dies and is reconciled to the idea that all life ends in death.


All beings are subject to death, have death as their end, have not gone beyond death.

Just as all a potter's vessels — whether baked or unbaked — are subject to breaking, have breaking as their end, and have not gone beyond breaking, in the same way all beings are subject to death, have death as their end, have not gone beyond death."

—Bhk. Thanissaro translation


[SN 1.4.18] Alms, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation, and the Sister Upalavanna translation.
Māra, the Evil One works a spell that prevents the people from giving the Buddha alms. He is greatly frustrated by the fact that this does not upset the Buddha at all.
[SN 1.7.12] Udaya, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Olendzki translation.
Udaya the Brahman challenges the Buddha's worthiness to receive food. The Buddha responds in verses vividly picturing the endless round of rebirths. The brahman is so impressed that he becomes a disciple.
[SN 1.7.16] Contradiction, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
A Brahmin named Gainsayer thought he would try to mess with the Buddha by saying the opposite of anything he said. The Buddha cuts him short telling him he would not debate with a person of such a corrupt heart so full of animosity. The brahmin was so impressed he became a disciple.
[SN 1.11.14] Poor, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
A poor man takes on the faith and is reborn in the Heaven of the Three and Thirty more splendid than the others. The gods are offended, but Sakka explains the great power of the Dahmma to them.
[SN 1.11.15] A Delightful Place, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha explains to Sakka how material enjoyments are of little worth compared to association with men of knowledge.
[SN 1.11.22] Ugly, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
A daemon that becomes more beautiful and powerful the more he is the subject of anger but who shrivvles up and disappears when treated with kindness.
A sutta that is much deeper than it looks!
[SN 1.11.24] A Transgression, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha illustrates the folly of unforgiveness by relating a story of Sakka's wisdom.

"There are these two wise people.

Which two?

The one who sees his transgression as a transgression, and the one who rightfully pardons another who has confessed his transgression.

—Bhk. Thanissaro translation

 


[SN 2.12.55] The Great Tree, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha likens the prospects for continued growth for one who delights in contimplation of whatever is included under the heading of fuel to the condition of a great tree with healthy roots sucking up it's nourishment.
Of course he recommends chopping the tree down and destroying it's every trace. It is interesting to note that there is a great variation in the use made of the same image in similes throughout the suttas. The Great Stable and Pithy Tree is often made to be the simile for the Buddha's Dhamma, where here it is made to be all that stands for the world of Pain.


 

Oblog: [O.1.14.21] Thursday, January 14, 2021 4:09 AM

[SN 4.35.118] To Sakka, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Sakka, king of the devas, asks the Buddha why it is that some people attain Nibbana in this life while others do not. He is told that it is dependent on whether or not a person does those things which support sense-consciousness.
The introduction here of Sakka, a deva, the king of the devas, is so casual as to defeat any argument that it was so introduced by the editors to puff up Gotama's image. If that had been the intention the mind set of such would have dictated an array of fabulous circumstances to highlight the occasion. Here Sakka just has a simple question, gets a simple answer and that's the end of it. I would feel much safer, even were I one who disbelieved in devas, saying that it is I that cannot see devas rather than saying that devas do not exist. The latter statement would require of me a vision more astounding than that which would be required to see a deva.
[SN 4.35.134] At Devadaha, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha makes a distinction between the seeker and the Arahant with regard to being careful about guarding the senses.
[SN 4.35.136] Delight in Forms, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that it is because of the instability of the objects of the senses that gods and men come to grief, but that the Arahant actually finds this instability his source of living at ease.
The sutta is especially interesting for the statement that it is the instability of sense objects that is the basis of ease for the Arahant. I don't believe this statement is made elsewhere in the suttas. How should this be understood? I would suggest that it is because the Arahant is free from the grief caused by this instability that perception of it is a reminder of what has been escaped. This is another way of stating that the consciousness of the Arahant is fed by perception of freedom; a statement that is made in several places throughout the suttas. See: Is Nibbana Conditioned? for more on this subject.
[SN 4.35.187] The Ocean (1), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha likens sense experience to the ocean with the sense objects being the source of it's turbulence. He who can transcend the turbulence is called free.
[SN 4.35.188] The Ocean (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha likens sense experience to the ocean in which the world, for the most part is drowned, tangled up and bound down. He who can get rid of lust, anger and blindness has transcended this ocean with it's great dangers.
[SN 4.35.190] The Milk Sap Tree, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha likens lust, hate and blindness to sap flowing from a cut in a sappy tree. In such a one even insignificant contact with sense objects overwhelms the heart, he has no hope when he comes into contact with powerful sense objects.
[SN 5.45.27] A Pot, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha illustrates the steadying effect of the Eightfold Way on the mind by the example of two pots, one with a stand and one without. The one without the stand is easily knocked over.
[SN 5.45.153] A Pot, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha provides a simile (as for previous sutta) illustrating the stability of the Dhamma. This is really an extract from a wheel sutta. See the other translations for the fully rolled out wheel.
[SN 5.46.3] One in Training, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation and the Olds translation.
The Buddha describes how even just the sight of an Arahant can lead to Awakening or non-returning.
The translations of both Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi are easy to misunderstand. They give the impression that the whole sequence from first seeing an Arahant to attaining the result is virtually instantaneous. "When a monk, so dwelling aloof, remembers and turns over in his mind the teaching of the Norm, it is then that the limb of wisdom which is mindfulness is established in that monk. When he cultivates the limb of wisdom which is mindfulness then it is that the monk's culture of it comes to perfection." etc. Bhk. Bodhi: "Dwelling thus withdrawn, one recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over. Whenever, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwelling thus withdrawn recollects that Dhamma and thinks it over, on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness is aroused by the bhikkhu; on that occasion the bhikkhu develops the enlightenment factor of mindfulness; on that occasion the enlightenment factor of mindfulness comes to fulfilment by development in the bhikkhu." The idea is that when he starts one thing he has at that same time also started the next thing, to fully develop the first thing the second thing must be fully developed; when the first thing has been fully developed the other things are at that time also fully developed. Development is a circular thing; a revolving evolving enveloping developing.
[SN 5.46.38] Hindrances, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha lists the diversions, then states how when one focuses one's mind on the Dhamma and is not diverted at such a time the seven dimensions of awakening can develop and come to completion.
Bhk. Bodhi has divided this sutta into two and states that his perception is that they deal with two different subjects. I read this as dealing with one subject: first the statement of the diversions, then the statement as to how when they have been eliminated the seven dimensions of awakening can develop.
What I believe is going on here and in the previous sutta but one, is that we are seeing the work of late editors trying to organize what was likely originally one long lesson into the ten suttas usually making up a chapter.
[SN 5.48.8] To Be Seen, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Olds translation.
The Buddha describes where each of the forces is to be seen at work. An invaluable sutta for understanding the forces.


The Force of Faith Energy Minding Serenity Wisdom
is Manifest in Association with
the Good;
Listening to Dhamma;
Tracing out the Origins
of things;
Actual Practice
Putting forth Energy to:
Refrain from unarisen bad conditions;
Restrain arisen bad conditions;
Retain arisen good conditions;
Obtain unarisen good conditions
Living in a body,
in sense-experience,
in mental states,
in the Dhamma,
seeing how they arise, how they sustain themselves, how they fall,
above it all,
Mindful and alert,
restraining desires and depression,
not downbound to anything at all in the World
Appreciation of the Peace of solitude;
Appreciation of the pleasure in Serenity;
Being content with Mindfulness and Ease;
Living in the purity of Detachment.
In knowing and seeing that
'This' is Pain,
this pain originates in desire,
to end the pain, end the desire,
This is the way: High View, High Principles, High Talk, High Works, High Lifestyle, High Self-control, High Mind, and High Serenity.

[SN 5.51.022] The Iron Ball, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Olds translation.
Ananda asks the Buddha if he is able to reach the Brahma realm in the physical body as well as in the mental body and is told that he is able to do so and explains how. In this sutta we get the method for the Magic Power known today as 'shape-shifting'. Vikubbanā-iddhi, 'the power of transformation'. In this example it is the power to visit the brahma world in this body. This sutta is also interesting from the point of view of the fact that it is one of the few instances where Gotama is asked directly about his mastery of magic powers and specifically about one which is always at the top of the list of doubts by skeptics: the ability to do magic deeds in this body — the only state considered 'real' by the skeptic.
[SN 5.3.8] Mallikā, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
King Pasenadi and his Queen Mallikā confess that there is no one more dear to the self than the self. The King visits the Buddha and the Buddha confirms this.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.13.21] Wednesday, January 13, 2021 4:17 AM

[AN 8.61] Desire, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Hare translation.
The Buddha deliniates the difference in attitude of eight sorts of persons who still wish for possessions, pointing out that it is the reaction with sorrow or joy to failure or success in their wishes that indicates that one has fallen from the path and the non-reaction with sorrow or joy that indicates that the other is still on the path.
[AN 9.8] To Sajjha, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation, the Sister Upalavanna translation and the Olds translation.
Nine ways in which it is impossible for an Arahant to transgress.


13 Things Impossible for an Arahant

The beggar who is arahant,
corruptions eliminated,
un-ocupied,
duty's doing done,
load laid down,
his own good gained,
yokes to existence thoroughly broken,
by the highest knowledge freed,
cannot behave in these thirteen manners of carring on:

[ 1] Such a one cannot behave with the purpose of cutting off breathing life;
[ 2] he cannot behave such as to take by theft what is not given;
[ 3] he cannot behave such as to engage in things related to copulation;
[ 4] he cannot behave such as to knowingly tell a lie;
[ 5] he cannot behave such as to store up for the pleasure of enjoyment in the same way as when earlier living in a house;
[ 6] he cannot behave such as to act upon wishes;
[ 7] he cannot behave such as to act upon repugnance;
[ 8] he cannot behave such as to act stupidly;
[ 9] he cannot behave such as to act in fear;
[10] he cannot reject the Buddha;
[11] he cannot reject the Dhamma;
[12] he cannot reject the Saṅgha;
[13] he cannot reject the training.


[AN 9.24] Beings, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Hare translation.
Nine ways in which beings tend to find rebirth stated in terms of body and consciousness.


What is Nine?
Nava Nama Kim?

What Nine Concepts, when seen to the Root with Penetrating Knowledge, and understood to the broadest limits, such that their repellant nature is seen as it really is and one has released them in their entirety, can bring one to the Uttermost Freedom of Detachment?

1. There are beings out there that inhabit separately appearing bodies and are differentiated in mind, such as human beings, certain gods and beings in the Lower Realms (animals, ghosts, demons, and creatures in the hells).

2. There are beings out there that inhabit separately appearing bodies but are of one mind, such as the beings of Brahma's Retinue.

3. There are beings out there that inhabit bodies that appear identical, but whose minds differ, such as the beings of the Abhassara Realm, who Radiate light.

4. There are beings out there that inhabit bodies that appear identical and who are of one mind, such as the beings of the Subhakinna Realm, who are Luminescent.

5. There are beings out there utterly without perception. These meditated on the idea that it was perception that was the cause of Dukkha, and aspired to non-percipience. Reborn in the Asaññā (nonpercipient) Realm, they abide there for as long as the power of the Wish that brought them there lasts, and then a thought occurs to them at which time they are reborn with the belief that they spontaneously appeared from nothing.

6. There are beings out there who, by rising above the perception of form, by eliminating the perception of limit (resistance, the sign of materiality), by not paying any attention to perceptions of difference, thinking "Space is Limitless" inhabit the Realm of Ākasa — Space. This sphere is reached using the arupajhana — immaterial burning high getting — of the same name, which is reached by the technique described here. This burning can be reached from the Fourth burning with ease, or with struggle from anyplace. Reentry is through what we call the collective unconscious, or collective memory. This is the place people "reach into" to materialize objects, and find things. "The Place Just Above the Place Where Allashi'tzah.").

7. There are beings out there who, by rising above the perception of the Sphere of Ākasa, thinking "Consciousness is Limitless" inhabit the realm of Consciousness — Viññāṇa. This is the second arūpajhāna, which is higher and more refined than the ākasa arupajhāna.

8. There are beings out there who, by rising above the perception of the Sphere of Viññāṇa, thinking, "There is nothing to be had there" inhabit the realm of Nothing to be Had There — Akincana. This is the third arūpajhāna, which is higher and more refined than the viññāṇa arupajhāna.

9. There are beings out there who, by passing completely beyond perceptions of Akincana, being completely unaware of any sphere where they are aware of being aware that they are there inhabit the realm named "N'evasaññānasaññā" The Realm of Neither-Perceiving-Nor-Non-Perceiving. This is the fourth arūpajhāna, which is higher and more refined than the akincana arūpajhāna. This, prior to the appearance of Gotama, was considered the highest achievement in personal evolution possible. Gotama pointed out that existence in the "N'evasaññānasaññā" sphere was subject to ending, and that the Jhāna that was the Ending-of-Sensation-Perception which was the door to Nibbāna was higher and more refined than that.


[AN 9.25] Discernment, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Hare translation.
The Buddha says that one with abundant wisdom may declare arahantship; then he defines what he means by wisdom.
[AN 10.18] Protectors (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Ten things that are protections for the seeker with the additional protection that having these protections the bhikkhus are inclined to instruct and guide such a seeker.
Neither Bhk. Thanissaro nor Bhk. Bodhi have made translations that make sense. Woodward has it correctly.
[AN 10.73] Wished For, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
Ten things that are much wished for, but hard to get in the world; ten things that are obstacles to getting them and ten things that are helpful for getting them.
Here Bhikkhu Thanissaro's translation is not in error, but Woodward's is clearer. In these days of the Covid virus it is interesting to note that the reason stated for being subject to disease is 'acting out of season' (Bhk. Thanissaro: "Unsuitable actions"; Bhk. Bodhi:. "Doing what is unbeneficial.") The Pali is Asappāya and PED has "likely, beneficial, fit, suitable", but also notes uses where the meaning is: something that did him good, a remedy; giving a drugs; omething beneficial, benefit, help, which seems more appropriate to the meaning here. Lack of preventive measures? Lack of medications? But the citations for these uses are from late books. The key is likely in the understanding of what is "unseasonable". Is there a common unseasonable action; or is acting unseasonably a common trait in the case of those who contract the Covid virus? Stupid question.
[AN 10.76] Incapable, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
A Paticca-Samuppada-like (this being that becomes, from the ending of this, the ending of that) progression of 10 steps of three factors each showing how lack of sense of shame, a fear of blame and being careful pevents growth in the ability to eliminate lust, hate and delusion, factors necessay for attaining freedom from birth, aging and death. Followed by the reverse course showing how sense of shame, a fear of blame, and being careful end up leading to the elimination of lust, hate, and delusion and the end of birth, aging and death. Followed by the reverse course showing how sense of shame, a fear of blame, and being careful end up leading to the elimination of lust, hate, and delusion and the end of birth, aging and death. Here again the dependence is not cast in terms of 'cause' but of ability to grow.
[AN 10.101] Contemplative Perceptions, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Olds translation.
When three things about the reality of his situation as a bhikkhu are perceived it results in the fulfillment of seven highly advantageous conditions in his life.
[SN 4.35.17] If There Were Not This (1), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha explains that one must see the satisfactions, disadvantages, and the way of escape from the personal sense spheres in order to attain enlightenment.
[SN 4.35.18] If There Were Not This (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha explains that one must see the satisfactions, disadvantages, and the way of escape from the spheres of the external sense objects in order to attain enlightenment.
Should be read together with the previous sutta.
[SN 4.35.19] Delight (1), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
He who takes delight in the personal senses is not free from Pain; he who does not take delight in the personal senses is free from pain.
Note here the implication that 'taking delight' is a willful act, not something that simply happens to one.
[SN 4.35.20] Delight (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Woodward translation.
He who takes delight in external sense objects is not free from Pain; he who does not take delight in external sense objects is free from pain.
Should be read together with the previous sutta.

 


 

Oblog: [O.1.12.21] Tuesday, January 12, 2021 4:50 AM

PED

Digital Pali Text Society's Pali English Dictionary upgrade update.

The .html version is now available.

The Upgrade version of the .htm edition of the PTS PED:
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This work is based on a scanned version of an early reprint of an early edition of The Pali Text Society's Pali English Dictionary revised in accordance with the 2015 "Reprint with corrections" by K.R. Norman, William Pruitt and Peter Jackson.

Further details on this edition are to be found at the beginning of the file.

It is not being claimed that this edition is error-free or all-encompassing. What it is at this time is the most error-free and encompassing of the on-line Pali Dictionaries.

Although it is available for viewing and use on this site, due to the size of the file, on-line use is not very practical. It is intended for downloading to your desktop and use from there.

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[AN 2.74] Pleasures, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Olds translation.
The Buddha describes two sorts of pleasure.
This sutta can be read in two different ways: as pleasures resulting from some basis and as pleasures with some object in view. The translations here are of both sorts. I object, as usual to the translation of upekkha as equanimity over detachment; the former being a state of mind bound up in the world and not a worthy object for a Buddhist meditator.
[AN 2.120] Rarely Having Enough, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Olds translation.
The Buddha descibes two who are hard to satisfy.
[AN 2.134] Without Investigating, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Woodward translation and the Olds translation.
The danger of taking a position on a matter that one has not investigated; the advantages of taking a position on a matter that one has investigated.


Look
before
you
leap.


[AN 5.23] Defilements, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The Buddha likens the process of purifying the mind to the process of purifying gold. Then he describes five super-normal powers attainable with the purified mind.
[AN 6.31] Decline, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Hare translation.
Six things that lead to the falling away of a bhikkhu in training, and six things that lead to not falling away.


Things Leading to Decline

Delight in worldly activity,
delight in talk,
delight in sleep,
delight in company,
delight in being unguarded as to the doors of the senses
delight in immoderate eating.

Hare translation


[AN 6.73] Jhāna (1), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Hare translation.
Six things which are required to enter and abide in the First Jhāna.


Six Which Must be Let Go
to Enter and Abide in
the First Jhāna

Desire for Sense Pleasures
Angry and Violent thoughts
Sleepyness and Sluggishness
Fear and Trembling
Doubt in the Buddha, Dhamma and Saṅgha
and not seeing the danger in desire for Sense Pleasures


[AN 6.74] Jhāna (2), the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation and the Olds translation.
Six things which are required to enter and abide in the First Jhana.
A different set of six. Hare has translated 'vitakka' as 'brooding over', and 'saññā' as 'conjuring up thoughts of'. 'Vicāra' might be 'brooding over' but not 'vitakka' which is in the place of our 'thinking' in huge numbers of contexts throughout the suttas. I object strongly to the translation of 'saññā' as 'thought'. I have done a translation for comparison. Bhk. Bodhi's translation of the two terms is the same as mine; his usual understanding of vitakka is, however, the Commentarial idea of 'initial thought'. But what does it mean to 'give up perception of sense-pleasures, etc.?' There is thinking about a thing, and then there is allowing the idea of a thing to be understood as having the potential to provide sense-pleasures, etc. It's at an earlier stage than 'thinking about'. You see an individual of the opposite sex and going beyond the perception of shape, you allow in the idea 'attractive', etc. That first 'allowing in' is perception and is a 'sign' of 'self'. "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder."
[AN 7.50] About Nandamātar, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation and the Sister Upalavanna translation.
Nanda's Mother declares seven wonderful things about herself including that she was a non-returner.
[AN 7.54] To Sīha, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, and the Hare translation.
General Siha questions the Buddha about the visible effects of giving.
[AN 8.19] Pahārāda, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
Gotama holds a conversation with an eminant Assura [Monster] and contrasts the eight things held to be delightful to them to eight things delightful to the bhikkhus.


Just as the Ocean has but one taste,
that is, the taste of salt;
In the same way this Dhamma/Discipline has but one taste,
that is, the taste of freedom.

This, in a nutshell, is the problem with activist Buddhism: it has two tastes: one for me and what I think is right and one for those who think differently.


[AN 8.22] About Ugga, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro, translation.
Linked to the Pali, the Hare translation and the Bhikkhu Bodhi translation.
The lay follower, Ugga, of Hatthigāma, is spoken of as having eight wonders associated with him, one of which was that he was a Non-returner. This is the same Ugga about whom it was said: "At the top, Beggars, of those of my Upasakas who serves the Order is Uggato Gahapati." — [AN 1 254]

 


 

Oblog: [O.01.08.21] Friday, January 08, 2021 4:09 AM

Sabbakāya

It's not
"All Body"
It is
"The Body as a Whole"
As a Whole.

Moving on from Minding just the Breating.


[AN 2.61] Communal Living, the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Linked to the Pali and the Woodward translation.
The Buddha describes the thinking of asocial bhikkhus and of bhikkhus intent on living peacefully with their fellow seekers.


Another way to understand Nekkhamma: Departure.

 


 

Oblog: [O.01.07.21] Thursday, January 07, 2021 5:16 AM

Digital Pali Text Society's Pali English Dictionary upgrade update.

The Upgrade version of the .txt edition of the PTS PED:
ped.utf8.txt 5.5MB!

Zipped file 2.2MB

This work is based on a scanned version of an early reprint of an early edition of The Pali Text Society's Pali English Dictionary revised in accordance with the 2015 "Reprint with corrections" by K.R. Norman, William Pruitt and Peter Jackson.

Further details on this edition are to be found at the beginning of the file.

An .html version is upcoming.

This file is intended for active translators and will serve well in some exotic projects requiring a Pali dictionary that people are working on.

 


 

Welcome Friend!
CONTINUED: The listings for:

To use the Oblog, What's New? listings as a study guide, start from the foot of the 2010-2013 file and work up working down through each entry date working up to the current What's New? page.

What's New? 2020What's New? 2019What's New? 2018What's New? 2017What's New? 2016
What's New? 2015What's New? 2014What's New? 2010-2013

 



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