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 [Ditthadhamma Lokadhamma]


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Friday, January 30, 2015
Previous upload was Wednesday, December 31, 2014


 


I yam'nt wot I yam'nt.
— Popeye, the awakened


 


"Ye dhammā hetuppabhavā||
tesaṃ hetuṃ Tathāgato āha||
tesañ ca yo nirodho,||
evaṃ vādī Mahāsamaṇo."
||
Assaji's explanation of Gotama's teaching to Sāriputta

What things as become by forces driven
The Tathagata says: 'Such are the driving forces
and such their end.'
Thus teaches the Great Shaman.
— Olds translation


 

Exercise: Take your list of names that you made up in preparation for your Recapitulation, (you did do that, yes?) and for each, visualize the individual or state the name (or do both) and make the wish: "May you be well and happy!"

 


 

new Thursday, January 08, 2015 8:16 AMTheragāthā, Psalms of the Brethren:
CXXV: Ajina, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
CXXVI: Melajina, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
CXXVII: Rādha, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
CXXVIII: Surādha, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
CXXIX: Gotama, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XXXVII: The Comrade of Kumā's Son, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XXXVIII: Gavampati, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XXXIX: Tissa, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XL Vaḍḍhamāna, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XLI Sirivaḍḍha, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XVI Belaṭṭhasīsa, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XVII Dasaka, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.
XVIII Singāla-Pitar, Mrs. Rhys Davids translation.

 

Recommended for diacritical input:

Genovation Keypad  Genovation Keypad
Click for larger image

The Genovation Keypad. A programmable keypad I use to input Pali characters. @ U.S. $140. See specs at Genovation.com It takes about an hour to set up and will save you hours of time and your wrists and fingers much pain. This is not a paid advertisement. I have received no compensation in any form for this recommendation.

 

new Monday, January 05, 2015 3:46 AMVinaya Piṭaka
VP.MV.1.21: The Disquisition on Burning.
21: The Sermon on 'The Burning,' The Rhys Davids Oldenberg translation.
The Vinaya variation of SN 4.35.28 and SN 3.22.61
A hair-raising sutta rendered pablum by abridgment.

 

new Monday, January 05, 2015 3:46 AM Personalities:
Pūraṇa Kassapa. Leader of a sect. Contemporary of Gotama. There is some confusion as to his doctrine, but it is likely to be that which is described by Mahali in SN 3.22.60, namely that there was no ultimate driving force (hetu) for either the degradation of beings or their salvation.
Assaji Thera, One of the 5 who left the world with Gotama. He was the 5th to become Arahant.

 


No c'assaṃ no ca me siyā||
na bhavassati na me bhavissati.|| ||

An' not 'were this', and not ''tis my',
were no 'will be', nor 'will be mine'.


 

Defining/Translating 'Sati'.

I have written about some of the below before, but there is an interesting development which I came across yesterday which I believe warrants a recapitulation as a lead in. So:

It is relatively well known that the word 'sati' stands for both 'mind' and 'memory' (you can look it up in the PED if it is not well known to you), yet the translation 'mindfulness' persists.

I am not saying here that 'mindfulness' is not a correct understanding of an aspect of sati. I am saying that it's use has overbalanced the meaning to the side of 'paying attention' and it does not provide the richness of the term I would suggest, that is, 'mind'.

I believe the translation 'mindfulness' has actually distorted the understanding of, the intent of, the Satipatthana sutta which is to my reading an exercise in the setting up, strengthening and organization of the mind via observation, investigation (comparing memory with memory) and memory.

There is a little puzzle riddle game that I believe shows us both the origin of the word itself and it's meaning:

The word 'sati' is made up of two syllables:

SA = one, once; and TI: three, this, thus

If you use the word 'SATI' as a manta (mantra), repeating it again and again 1,3; 1,3; 1,3 ... there comes a time when the word breaks open and one becomes aware that there is something missing. What is that? 'Two'. It should be 1,2,3. This becoming aware of an issue and recollecting a solution, produces a certain satisfaction in the mind. This, I say, is the true meaning of sati: the satisfaction of a fulfilled memory which is another way of saying a satisfied mind.

Of course modern linguists and philologists will have a conniption fit reading this. But I would remind them that language did not just appear whole bang snap fingers done right from the start. Maybe not this world cycle, but once upon a time it started from scratch. Probably from the sound 'Ah.' And there would have been a period where there was delight in the composition of words and thought given as to how to make words stand for things that one wished to communicate to others. Starting from a language made up of single syllables, how does one describe memory?

And then we have: "Once Thus". What is that but memory?

Mind is, at its most basic, memory. This meaning is lost completely with the translation 'mindfulness.'

On the other hand 'mind' has been and still is used for the idea of 'paying attention'. "Mind the children." "Mind your manners."

'Mind' for 'mind' does not need explanation.

But 'mind' for 'remember' has eluded me until yesterday when in reading a very entertaining and 'worldly-educational' writer of cowboy stories (including Hopalong Cassidy), Louis L'amour, his "The Lonesome Gods", wherein he uses dialogue from c. 1850 I came across this exchange (pg 259):

We were looking at him, waiting. "Paulino Weaver, he's moved in over yonder. Been here for some time."

"Mountain man," Jacob said. "I mind meeting him some while back. He's a good man."

And now that I read this, I mind hearing it before myself in actual conversations.

 

new Thursday, January 01, 2015 9:18 AM Saŋyutta Nikāya
[SN 3.22.56] Grasping (applied to) the Series, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha describes the stockpiles (kandha) in detail and shows how they are to be analyzed according to the Four Truths.
Note here that sankhara (my 'own-making') is described in terms of intent (sancitana) making it very clear that this term is to be understood as a synonym for kamma. Here is the argument against relying on the commentary for understanding technical terms. There is no need for commentary. Every important term is defined by Gotama himself. What is needed is not consultation with the commentaries, it is thorough examination of the suttas. When you have mastered the suttas it is then sometimes interesting to cosult the commentaries for background stories. There I say is their real value.
[SN 3.22.57] The Seven Points, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha defines one who has mastered Dhamma: He is skilled in knowledge of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness; he knows what results in their arising, he knows what brings about their ending; he knows their satisfaction, their pain and the way to escape them; and he investigates things in three ways: by way of their elementary data, by way of their relationship to the senses, and by way of that on which they depend for their arising (the paticca samuppada).
Compare this with living in the Dhamma overseeing the Dhamma through the Dhamma of the Satipatthana Sutta.
[SN 3.22.58] Fully Enlightened, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha Explains the difference between a Buddha and an Arahant.
Since the distinction is the fact of the Buddha having first discovered the way and made it known wbereas the Arahant obtains the knowledge via a Buddha, the title (Sambuddho) would better be translated 'Self-awakened'.
[SN 3.22.60] Mahāli, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha explains to Mahali that beings become corrupt or pure as a result of reactions to the painful and pleasant features of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
[SN 3.22.61] Āditta Suttaṃ, the Pali,
On Fire, the F.W. Woodward translation,
A fire and brimstone sermon teaching that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are as if on fire.
This is a variation, using the stockpiles (khandhas) of the following which use 'The All'. VP.MV.I.21, SN 4.35.28 and SN 3.22.61. But I think for the full effect the best rendering is the compilation used for The Sixth Lesson. ... which should tell you that the stockpiles (khandha) = the all (salayatana); Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness is another way of saying: the eye and sight, the ear and sound, the nose and scents, the tongue and tastes, the body and touches, and the mind and things.
[SN 3.22.62] Niruttipatha Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Mode of Reckoning, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Getting Down to the Fundamentals, the Olds translation,
The Buddha affirms that the most fundamental way of describing things (shapes, sense-experiences, perceptions, the own-make, and consciousness) is relative to their position in Time.
One of the more obscure and unusual suttas it is nevertheless a valuable piece of information for meditators who reach levels of perception outside of time (akalika); one of the attributes of the Arahant.
[SN 3.22.63] Upādiyamāno Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Clinging, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is held on to that belongs to Mara, by letting go of that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.64] Maññamāno Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Imagining, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is imagined that belongs to Mara, by letting go of that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.65] Abhinandana Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Imagining, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever one is enamoured of that belongs to Mara, by letting go of that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.66] Anicca Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Impermanent, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is inconstant, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.67] Dukkha Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Suffering, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is painful, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.68] Anattā Suttaṃ, the Pali,
No Self, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is not the self, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
Caution: Here Woodward's translation of Anatta as 'no self' is correct Dhamma because of the construction of the sutta. It says what is anattā, desire for that should be let go. This is not an opinion or point of view concerning the ultimate existence of a self. It is speaking of the nature of body, etc. To say 'body is no self' is not to say 'there is no self.' Still it would have been better to have translated this as 'not self'.
[SN 3.22.69] Anattaniya Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Not Belonging to the Self, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever does not belong to the self, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.70] Rajanīyasaṇṭhita Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Lustful, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is inherent in what is lustful, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
[SN 3.22.71] Rādha Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Rādha, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha teaches Radha how to be sure that all notions of "I" and "mine" have been eradicated.
That is that one can see that whatever shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness there may be, past, future or present, exalted or lowly, pleasant or unpleasant it is all regarded as not the self or belonging to the self.
[SN 3.22.72] Surādha Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Surādha, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha teaches Suradha how to be sure that all notions of "I" and "mine" have been eradicated.
[SN 3.22.73] Assādo Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Satisfaction, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha explains that the difference between the disciple and the ordinary commoner (puthujjano) is in the understanding of the satisfaction, misery, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
It is an unfortunate habit of some bhikkhus today to refer to all those who are not actual members of the worldly sangha as 'puthujjano'. Here we see the real meaning. This should be understood also in the parallel case of the sangha when defined as the four pairs of men. "It is not by the color of his cloths, beggars, that one who is close to me is to be known."
[SN 3.22.74] Paṭhama Samudayo Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Arising (1), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha explains that the difference between the disciple and the ordinary commoner (puthujjano) is in the understanding of the arising, ending, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
[SN 3.22.75] Dutiya Samudayo Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Arising (2), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha explains that the disciple understands the satisfaction, misery, arising, ending, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
[SN 3.22.76] Paṭhama Arahanta Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Arahants (1), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha teaches that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are inconstant, that what is inconstant is painful, that what is painful is not the self and that such things should be regarded as 'not mine', not the self.
NOTE: This sutta concludes with a statement that among beings up to the highest of those who have become, Arahanship is the culmination and mastery. This is translated in a misleading way such as to indicate that Arahantship is to be included as one of the 'becomings.' Woodward has also mistranslated 'sattavasa' as 'the seven abodes.' This is 'being's vestments', or 'abodes of beings', and there are nine of such.
[SN 3.22.77] Dutiya Arahanta Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Arahants (2), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha teaches that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are inconstant, that what is inconstant is painful, that what is painful is not the self and that such things should be regarded as 'not mine', not the self.
Identical to the previous but without the concluding verses.
[SN 3.22.78] Sīhopama Suttaṃ, the Pali,
The Lion, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha compairs the effect of the teaching of the Dhamma on gods and men to the effect of the lion's roar on the creatures of the forest.
Both cause fear and trembling at the thought of mortality.
[SN 3.22.79] The Prey, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Beginning with a discussion of what it is that one speaks of when one speaks of recollecting past lives, the Buddha then gives some detailed explanation of what is to be understood by shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness. Then speaking of these things as inconstant, painful and not self he describes the arahant as becoming disgsted at them and by that becoming free and by perceiving freedom in that freedom, reaching arahantship. Then further he describes such a one as one who neither heaps up or reduces, neither lets go nor takes up, neither scatters nor gathers.
[SN 3.22.80] Almsman, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha explains that the bhikkhus have entered 'the lowest profession', that of scrap (or 'chunk', or 'glob' or 'mess') (see SN 3.22.96 where it is used for a tiny 'bit' or 'lump' of dung) hunters, not from want of a livlihood or fears, but because it is in this way that some way out of all the pain in the world may be found.||
Although the term here is not 'bhikkhu' (beggar), but 'pindola' scrap hunter, or 'dole-man', someone on the dole, the spirit is the same. Many of the 'monks' of today object strenuously to being called 'beggars' and have completely missed the point: It is by adopting the lowest of callings that pride of birth is humbled and by showing those who are beggars as a consequence of their bad kamma, that such a life can be lived with ease, generosity, virtue and dignity it teaches the way out of their misery. The translation of 'bhikkhu' as 'monk' and of 'pindola' as 'almsman' or 'mendacant' whitewashes the truth and destroys the lesson.
This sutta is also interesting in that it records a feat of magic power in which the bhikkhus are lead to believe they are appearing before the Buddha singly or in pairs though they are all addressed simultaneously.
[SN 3.22.81] Pārileyya, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Describing a method for quickly eliminating the corrupting influences of lust, existing and blindness, the Buddha shows how holding any sort of opinion or view that the self is, or has, or has within or is within shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness, or even having doubt about such is own-making, and that which is own-made, is inconstant, and that which is inconstant is painful and that by getting rid of such opinions and doubts, one quickly gets rid of the corrupting influences.
This sutta focuses down on the idea of sankhara in such a way as to make it absolutely clear that the meaning of this term is own-making, personalizing the objective, fabricating the individuality, con-structing the individuality, own-making.
[SN 3.22.82] Puṇṇamā Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Full Moon, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha delivers a comprehensive discourse on the fuel stockpiles, the 'panc-upadana-kkhandha'.
Here is a really good example of how the Dhamma was propagated among the bhikkhus. Togethere with his five hundred pupils, face-to-face with the Buddha, a group teacher asks a series of questions which when answered by the Buddha elucidate the entire spectrum of doctrines concerning the 'pañc-upādāna-kkhandhā,' the five fuel-stockpiles. Completely blurred over by abridgment.
[SN 3.22.83] Ānanda, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
Ananda relates to the bhikkhus how Punna taught him about the stockpiles (khandha) and how that was the teaching that resulted in him becoming a streamwinner.
Here Woodward translates 'upādā' as 'cause'. This makes four terms the reader must remember to determine what, exactly is the Pali term being translated. Others are 'nidana' (tied to), 'paccaya' (result), and 'hetu' (driving force, engine). Even the usual 'grasping' would be better. Better would be 'support' or 'fueled by'. Bhk. Thanissaro here translates the term 'possessiveness.' Bhk. Bodhi has 'clinging'.
[SN 3.22.84] Tissa the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali the Bhikkhu Thanissaro and the Olds translation.
The Buddha instructs and uplifts the venerable Tissa who has become discouraged.
A very instructive parable on the experiences to be expected by one who is walking the path concludes this sutta.
[SN 3.22.86] Anurādha, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha instructs Anuradha as to how to respond to those of other views who ask about the existence or non-existence of the Tathagata after death (one who has won Arahantship).
[SN 3.22.88] Assaji Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Assaji, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Venerable Assaji is suffering an illness which prevents him from attaining jhana and he is worried about falling away. The Buddha explains to him that the essence of his teaching is not the attaining of jhana, and he instructs him in such a way as to bring about Assaji's arahantship.
There is some problem here with the identification of this Assaji with the Assaji who renounced the world with Gotama and who was the first teacher of Sāriputta. That Assaji would almost certainly have been called here 'Assaji Thera', where this Assaji is called 'āyasmā Assaji, 'Elder'. Either this is the mistake or there is a far more serious error in that 'Assaji Thera' was supposed to have attained arahantship during the second discourse (Pañca Suttam) and this Assaji still has doubts and must be instructed concerning inconstance, pain and not self.
[SN 3.22.89] Khema Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Khema, the F.W. Woodward translation,
A dialogue between Venerable Khema and a group of elder bhikkhus concerning identification with the five fuel stockpiles (khandhas).
This is a very instructive sutta told with a wonderful sense of humor. The very important thing to note here is Khema's explanation of how it can be that though one has thoroughly broken the idea of identification of self with the khandhas, there can remain a subtle inclination towards this identification.
[SN 3.22.90] Channa, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
After Channa has mastered understanding of the inconstance and lack of self in the khandhas, he receives further instruction in the Paticca Samuppada from Ananda.||
Woodward, Bhk. Thanissaro, and Bhk. Bodhi all accept the commentary as to the identification of this 'Channa' as the Buddha's charioteer who left the world with him and was at the last of the Buddha's life given the punishment that he was not to be spoken to. But here we see in this very sutta the bhikkhus teaching him. There must be some part of the story we have not heard that explains the behavior of the bhikhus, or this must be another Channa.
[SN 3.22.91] Paṭhama Rāhula Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Rāhula (1), the F.W. Woodward translation,
Rahula, Gotama's son, receives instruction on how to view all things as not-self.
[SN 3.22.92] Dutiya Rāhula Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Rāhula (2), the F.W. Woodward translation,
Rahula, Gotama's son, receives instruction on how to view all things as not-self.
[SN 3.22.93] The River, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali theBhikkhu Thanissaro translation and the Olds translation.
The Buddha likens the way beings grasp at body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness to the way a man being swept away by a swiftly flowing stream grasps at the reeds and bushes on the bank only to have them break away, giving him no means to escape destrucion.
[SN 3.22.94] The River, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Olds translation.
The Buddha takes the position that it is not he that argues with the world, but it is the world that argues with him, that he agrees with those who are worldly-wise who say 'there is not,' that is that there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness which is constant, that he agrees with those who say 'it is' that is that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are simply pain. This he says he teaches and he dismisses those who hearing him so teach do not comprehend.
[SN 3.22.95] Foam, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha gives similes for each of the khandhas: shape: foam; sense-experience: a bubble on the water; perception: a mirage; own-making: searching for heartwood in the wrong tree; consciousness: a magician's illusion.
Again, as always, the similes are very helpful in getting a grip on the perception of these phenomena as they really are.
[SN 3.22.96] Gomaya Piṇḍupama Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Cowdung, the F.W. Woodward translation,
A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not, and then he is shown by way of example, a past life of Gotama where he was a king of extraordinary wealth and splendor and yet all that wealth and splendor has disappeared.
[SN 3.22.97] Tip of the Nail, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not, and then the Buddha explains that if there were one of the stockpiles (khandhas) even as small as a bit of dust that were stable and everlasting there would be no need to teach the Dhamma.
This is not 'it would not be possible to teach the Dhamma' it is 'would not be necessary'. How come? because if there were any thing in existence (we might say, even a rock) with which individuals could identify that was stable and everlasting, that would solve the problem of the pain of existence brought about by change. What wise men and teachers would be teaching is how to identify with this thing. Think about what this says about consciousness.
[SN 3.22.98] Suddhika (or Samuddaka) Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Puritan (or Oceanic), the F.W. Woodward translation,
A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not.
Identical with the first part of the previous two suttas. Likely this was the first of the series to be delivered.
[SN 3.22.99] The Leash (or The Thong) (1), the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha likens the way the commoner runs around after shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness to the way a dog tied to a post runs round and round the post and never gets free of the post.
The way this is abridged in the PTS Pali is subject to various interpretations as to how it should be expanded. My version of the BJT has it expanded both with mistakes and in a way which is more repetitious than even the usual Pali. Woodward abridges his version in a way different than the PTS Pali. Bhks. Thanissaro and Bodhi abridge closely paralleling Woodward. I have unabridged it in the way I believe is most likely to reflect the original delivery.
[SN 3.22.100] The Leash (2), the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha likens the way the commoner runs around after shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness to the way a dog tied to a post runs round and round the post and never gets free of the post. Then he likens the creativity of mind in devising the taints that corrupt individuals to that of the hypnotist creating an illusion, to nature in devising the various forms of animals, or to an artest creating an image of a man or a woman.
The first of the similes for mind is (caraṇaŋ nāma cittaŋ) "heart called 'wanderer'" or "wandering (so named) heart" or "colors called 'meandering'" or "a meandering painting" or "a wandering bedazzlement" ... Bhk. Thanissaro translates as 'a moving contraption'; Bhk. Bodhi translates 'that picture called 'Faring On'. This is basically a 'fill in the blank' issue. I suggest above that which appeals to my imagination. The commentarial explanation could be understood to apply to almost anything masterful. It is doubtful to me that this refers to a painting because that is the meaning of the third simile.
[SN 3.22.101] Adze-handle (or The Ship), the F.W. Woodward translation,
Linked to the Pali and the Bhikkhu Thanissaro translation.
The Buddha provides several similes which illustrate the fact that it is not by wishing, but by mastering the understanding and behaviors found in the Dhamma that freedom from rebirth is attained.
This sutta contains the famous simile of the hand-prints on the adze handle, where to illustrate how, though it is for some difficult to perceive progress on a daily basis, over time one will be able to view the advantages, he points out that on a daily basis the carpenter does not see how much of the handle is warn away by his grip, over time he will see the imprint of his hand on the wood. This does not contradict the description of the Dhamma as being of immediate consequence. From the moment one abstains from a harmful activity, the possibility of consequences of such activity cease. This is referring to perception of such changes, and even there it is not saying that this ability to perceive is something that will necessarily take a long time. There are cases where a person perceives he is free of debt and has become an Arahant within a half day and sometimes less.
[SN 3.22.102] Aniccasaññā Suttaṃ aka Aniccatā or Saññā the Pali,
Impermanence (or Perception), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha enumerates a string of similes illustrating the benefits of perception of inconstance (anicca).
[SN 3.22.103] Antā Suttaṃ the Pali,
The Separates, the F.W. Woodward translation,
Ends the M. Olds translation
The Buddha describes four goals in detail.
I have done a translation because all the others have blindly followed the commentary and the result makes no sense.
The word to understand is: Antā. 'Ends.' As in 'ends and means,' 'goals.' I have here translated this as 'ends' and 'attainment' to hopefully clear up the use. Rhys Davids in the Sangiti Suttanta translates 'limits.' Bhk. Bodhi footnotes the term as 'ends' but translates 'portions'. Woodward translates 'separates' and notes the commentary defines it as 'koṭṭhāsā' 'divisions'. Woodward notes Childers' more rational "goals of doctrine".
[SN 3.22.104] Dukkha Suttaṃ the Pali,
Suffering, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha teaches about pain, the arising of pain, the ending of pain and the way to the ending of pain.
[SN 3.22.105] Sakkāya Suttaṃ the Pali,
The Person-pack, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha defines individuality, the arising of individuality, the ending of individuality and the walk to walk to the ending of individuality.
A variation of the previous two.
[SN 3.22.106] Pariññeyya Suttaṃ the Pali,
Things to be Understood, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha states the Dhamma briefly in terms of understanding.
[SN 3.22.107] Paṭhama Samaṇa Suttaṃ the Pali,
Recluses (1), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
[SN 3.22.108] Dutiya Samaṇa Suttaṃ the Pali,
Recluses (2), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
Identical with the previous. It is very unusual for a sutta to be an exact duplicate of another.
[SN 3.22.109] Sotāpanna Suttaṃ the Pali,
Stream-winner, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha defines streamwinning in terms of understanding the arising, ending, satisfaction, misery, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
[SN 3.22.110] Arahanta Suttaṃ, the Pali,
The Arahant, the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha defines the arahant in terms of understanding the arising, ending, satisfaction, misery, and escape from, and the experience of liberation without further fuel from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
[SN 3.22.111] Paṭhama Chandarāga Suttaṃ, the Pali,
Desirous-Lustful (2), the F.W. Woodward translation,
The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to abandon all desire and lust for shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.

 


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