Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttara Nikāya
Eka-Nipātā

The Book of Ones

Suttas 1-97

Translated from the Pali by Michael Olds

 


 

Introduction

I hear this "sutta" as a real magic spell. In the case of the Pali, a Spell is more like a "dis-spell" — designed to waken one from the spell of Mara's illusion. Here, however we have a spell very much as would be cast by any ordinary (haha) sorcerer ... a steady drumbeat, almost out of the range of perception, delivered a tiny bit at a time over an extended period, so that only the most alert of Gotama's followers would be aware that there was continuity to it ... with the rest of the followers being affected without their knowledge ... and, perhaps a third group, following along after, gathering together the pieces second hand, trying to catch up with a growing sense of excitement. A work of art was in the making!

I have taken a liberty with the Pali as set into writing. For some reason some chapters are divided in an illogical way — sometimes a sutta is split, sometimes a series is split. I have taken out the "Chapter Heads," and have numbered the suttas sequentially throughout indicating and linking to the PTS translation chapter numbers through the sutta number that starts the chapter.

MO/Los Altos,
California,
September 2000

 


 

In the Name of the Potter
Aristocrat
Number One High Awakened One

Evaɱ Me Sutaɱ

I Hear Tell

Once Upon A Time, The Potter, Savatthi Town, Jeta Grove, Anathapindika Park, came-a revisiting. There, to the beggars gathered round, he said:

"Beggars!"

And "Broke Tooth!" was their response.

[1] [PTS I] [upal] "Beggars! I see no other single form
by which a man's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a woman.

A woman's form, beggars,
overpowers a man's heart.[1]

[2][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single sound
by which a man's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a woman.

The sound of a woman, beggars,
overpowers a man's heart.

[3][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single scent
by which a man's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a woman.

The scent of a woman, beggars,
overpowers a man's heart.

[4][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single taste
by which a man's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a woman.

The taste of a woman, beggars,
overpowers a man's heart.

[5][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single touch
by which a man's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a woman.

The touch of a woman, beggars,
overpowers a man's heart.

[6][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single form
by which a woman's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a man.

A man's form, beggars,
overpowers a woman's heart.

[7][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single sound
by which a woman's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a man.

The sound of a man, beggars,
overpowers a woman's heart.

[8][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single scent
by which a woman's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a man.

The scent of a man, beggars,
overpowers a woman's heart.

[9][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single taste
by which a woman's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a man.

The taste of a man, beggars,
overpowers a woman's heart.

[10][pts][upal] Beggars! I see no other single touch
by which a woman's heart is more overpowered
than it is by that of a man.

The touch of a man, beggars,
overpowers a woman's heart.

 

§

 

[11] [PTS II] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to cause the appearance of wanting[2]
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase
as the beautiful feature[3] in a thing.

The mark of beauty, beggars,
if not traced back to its origins[4]
causes the appearance of wanting
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase.

[12][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to cause the appearance of anger
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase
as the mark of the repellant in a thing.

The mark of the repellant, beggars,
if not traced back to it's origins,
causes the appearance of anger
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase.

[13][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to cause the appearance of lazy ways and inertia[5]
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase
as dislike of activity,
indulging in feeling tired and sleepy,
allowing one's self to become drowsy after a meal,
and inactivity of mind.

Dislike of activity,
indulging in feeling tired and sleepy,
allowing one's self to become drowsy after a meal,
and inactivity of mind, beggars,
causes the appearance of lazy ways and inertia
if not present or, if present,
to causes it's growth and increase.

[14][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to cause the appearance of fear and trembling[6]
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase
as the turbulent mind.

The turbulent mind, beggars,
causes the appearance of fear and trembling
if not present or, if present,
causes it's growth and increase.

[15][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to cause the appearance of doubt[7]
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's growth and increase,
as not tracing things back to their origins.

Not tracing things back to their origins, beggars,
causes the appearance of doubt
if not present or, if present,
causes it's growth and increase.

[16][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to prevent the appearance of wanting
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's disappearance
as the mark of the repellant.

The mark of the repellant in a thing, beggars,
if traced back to it's origins,
prevents the appearance of wanting
if not present, or, if present,
causes it's disappearance.

[17][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to prevent the appearance of anger
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's disappearance
as freeing the heart through friendly vibrations.

Freeing the heart through friendly vibrations, beggars,[8a]
prevents the appearance of anger
if not present or, if present,
causes it's disappearance.

[18][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to prevent the appearance of lazy ways and inertia
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's disappearance
as exerting energy.

Exerting energy, beggars,
prevents the appearance of lazy ways and inertia
if not present or, if present,
causes it's disappearance.

[19][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to prevent the appearance of fear and trembling
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's disappearance
as calming the mind.

Calming the mind, beggars,
prevents the appearance of fear and trembling
if not present or, if present,
causes it's disappearance.

[20][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
of more power to prevent the appearance of doubt
if not present or, if present,
to cause it's disappearance
as tracing things to their origin.

Tracing things to their origin, beggars,
prevents the appearance of doubt
if not present or, if present,
causes it's disappearance.

 

§

 

[21][PTS III][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more unworkable
than the uncultivated mind.

The uncultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed[8] an unworkable thing.

[22][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more workable
than the cultivated mind.

The cultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed a workable thing.

[23][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the uncultivated mind.

The uncultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[24][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the cultivated mind.

The cultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[25][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the dull, lifeless, uncultivated mind.

The uncultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[26][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the sharp, lively, cultivated mind.

The cultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[27][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the unexercised, uncultivated mind.

The uncultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[28][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the exercised, cultivated mind.

The cultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[29][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
piling on more pain[9]
than the unexercised, uncultivated mind.

The unexercised, uncultivated mind,
indeed piles on pain.

[30][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
piling on more pleasure
than the exercised, cultivated mind.

The exercised, cultivated mind,
indeed piles on pleasure.

[31][PTS IV][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the untamed mind.

The untamed mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[32][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the tamed mind.

The tamed mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[33][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the unguarded mind.

The unguarded mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[34][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the guarded mind.

The Guarded mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[35][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the unprotected mind.

The unprotected mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[36][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the protected mind.

The protected mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[37][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the uncontrolled mind.

The uncontrolled mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[38][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the controlled mind.

The controlled mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[39][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than the untamed, unguarded, unprotected, uncontrolled mind.

The untamed, unguarded, unprotected, uncontrolled mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[40][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than the tamed, guarded, protected, controlled mind.

The tamed, guarded, protected, controlled mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

 

§

 

[41] [PTS V] Imagine, beggars, a booby trap
made from a spike of barbed wheat or barley,
is aimed contrary to the direction necessary —
think you that hand or foot pressing upon it,
it will penetrate hand or foot,
or cause blood to appear?

This is hard to see.

How come?

Because the spike is aimed
in the contrary direction,
that's how come.

In the same way, beggars,
that a beggar whose mind is aimed in the contrary way,
to think him able to penetrate blindness[10],
to cause vision to appear,
to see Nibbāna for himself;
this is hard to see.

How come?

Because his mind is aimed
in the contrary direction,
that's how come."

[42][pts] "Imagine, beggars, a booby trap
made from a spike of barbed wheat or barley,
is consummately aimed —
Think you that hand or foot pressing upon it,
will penetrate hand or foot,
or cause blood to appear?

This is easy to see.

How come?

Because the spike
is consummately aimed,
that's how come.

In the same way, beggars,
that a beggar whose mind is aimed toward the high,
to think him able to penetrate blindness,
to cause vision to appear,
to see Nibbāna for himself;
this is not hard to see.

How come?

Because his mind
is aimed toward the high,
that's how come.

[43][pts] Now here, beggars,
we have a certain one
whose corrupt mind is known
through mind encompassing mind.[11]
If here and now this man
were to make an end of his time here
he would be cast into Niraya
in accordance with the way he is living.
How come?

Because this beggar's mind is corrupt,
that's how come.

That's the way it is, beggars;
when the mind is corrupt,
at the breakup of the body at death,
a being finds consciousness again
in a short lived, painful birth,
in The Downfall,
in The Ruin,
in Hell,
Where the Sun Don't Shine.

[44][pts] Now here, beggars,
we have a certain one
whose calm, surpassingly pure mind
is known through mind encompassing mind.
If here and now
this man were to make an end of his time here
he would be cast into a heavenly state
in accordance with the way he is living.
How come?

Because this beggar's calm mind is surpassingly pure,
that's how come.

That's the way it is, beggars;
when the calm mind is surpassingly pure,
at the breakup of the body at death,
a being finds consciousness again
in a long lived, happy birth,
in a heavenly state.

[45][pts][ati] In the same way, beggars,
as if high in some mountain crag,
there were a pool of murky,
roiled up, polluted, muddy water,
and a man, standing at the edge,
who had eyes in his head that could see.
He could not see in that pool,
small stones and larger stones,
and small fish
and now and again
some large fish moving around.
How Come?

Because that pool is roiled up,
that's how come.

In the same way, beggars,
for that beggar there,
living in darkness,
with his roiled up, polluted mind,
to be able to see his own gain,
to be able to see another's gain,
to be able to see what is mutually profitable to himself and others;
to be able to attain
the extraordinary aristocratic knowledge and vision
of things the way they truly are
that leads to satisfaction in Nibbāna;
this is hard to imagine.
How come?

Because that beggar's mind is roiled up.
That's how come.

[46][pts][ati] But in the same way, beggars,
as if high in some mountain crag,
there were a pool of deep,
clear, calm, transparent water,
and a man, standing at the edge,
who had eyes in his head that could see.
He could see in this pool,
small stones and larger stones,
and small fish
and now and again some large fish moving around.[12]
How Come?

Because this pool is calm,
that's how come.

In the same way, beggars,
for this beggar here,
with his calm mind surpassingly pure,
to be able to see his own gain,
to be able to see another's gain,
to be able to see what is mutually profitable
to himself and others;
to be able to attain
the extraordinary aristocratic knowledge and vision
of things the way they truly are
that leads to satisfaction in Nibbāna;
this is not hard to imagine.
How come?

Because this beggar's mind is calm.
That's how come.

[47][pts][ati] In the same way, beggars,
as of all the various types of trees
the sandalwood is considered best,
that is, in terms of it's softness and workability,
I see no other single thing
more conducive to malleability and workability
than exercising and cultivating the mind.

The exercised and cultivated mind, beggars,
is indeed conducive to malleability and workability.

[48][pts][ati] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more susceptible to rapid change
as the mind.

It is no easy thing, beggars
to describe how quickly the mind can change.

[49][pts][ati] This here mind [point hand to head][13], beggars, is brilliant,
and then goes on to be slimed up with the slimed up.

[50][pts][ati] This here mind, beggars, is brilliant,
and then may go on to be freed of the slimed up.[14]

[51] [PTS VI][ati] "This here mind, beggars, is brilliant,
and then goes on to be slimed up with the slimed up."

The significance of this
is not understood by the ordinary common man.

That is the reason
there is no cultivation of the mind
by the ordinary common man.

So say I.

[52][pts][ati] "This here mind, beggars, is brilliant,
and then may go on to be freed of the slimed up."

The significance of this
is understood by the well educated student of the aristocrats.

That is the reason
there is cultivation of the mind
by the well educated student of the aristocrats.

So say I.

[53][pts] If a beggar, beggars, practices the heart of friendly vibrations,
even if only for so short a time as it takes to [SNAP] the fingers,
he is worthy to be called "beggar."
His is no useless meditation,
he lives making himself like the Teacher,
responding to intelligent advice,
subsisting on the gifts of the realm.

What then can be said
of one who makes much of such a thing?

[54][pts] If a beggar, beggars, develops the heart of friendly vibrations,
even if only for so short a time as it takes to [SNAP] the fingers,
he is worthy to be called "beggar."
His is no useless meditation,
he lives making himself like the Teacher,
responding to intelligent advice,
subsisting on the gifts of the Realm.

What then can be said
of one who makes much of such a thing?

[55][pts] If a beggar, beggars, makes up his mind to have a heart of friendly vibrations,
even if only for so short a time as it takes to [SNAP] the fingers,
he is worthy to be called "beggar."
His is no useless meditation,
he lives making himself like the Teacher,
responding to intelligent advice,
subsisting on the gifts of the Realm.

What then can be said
of one who makes much of such a thing?

[56][pts] Whatever it is, beggars,
that is an unskillful thing,
an unskillful part,
an unskillful aspect,
mind is the forerunner of them all.

First comes mind,
then those unskillful things follow accordingly.

[57][pts] Whatever it is, beggars,
that is a skillful thing,
a skillful part,
a skillful aspect,
mind is the forerunner of them all.

First comes mind,
then those skillful things follow accordingly.

[58][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than carelessness[15]

In one who is careless,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[59][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than being careful.[16]

In one who is careful,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[60][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than idleness.

In one who is idle,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[61] [PTS VII] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than energetic effort.

In one who makes energetic effort,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[62][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than much wishing.

In one of much wishing,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[63][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than little wishing.

In one of little wishing,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[64][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than discontent.

In one who is discontent,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[65][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than contentment.

In one who is content,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[66][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than not tracing things to their origins.

In one who does not trace things to their origins,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[67][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than tracing things to their origins.

In one who traces things to their origins,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[68][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than not thinking things over.

In one who does not think things over,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[69][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than thinking things over

In one who thinks things over,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[70][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than keeping bad company.

In one who keeps bad company,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[71] [PTS VIII] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than keeping good company.

In one who keeps good company,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[72][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of unskillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of skillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than devotion to unskillful things
and lack of devotion to skillful things.

In one who devotes himself to unskillful things
and has a lack of devotion to skillful things,
unskillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and skillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[73][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of skillful conditions
if not yet in this visible thing,
or to causing
the disappearance of unskillful conditions
that are in this visible thing
than devotion to skillful things
and lack of devotion to unskillful things.

In one who devotes himself to skillful things
and has a lack of devotion to unskillful things,
skillful conditions not yet in this visible thing appear,
and unskillful conditions in this visible thing disappear.

[74][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to preventing
the appearance of the seven dimensions of awakening one's own wisdom[17]
if not yet in this visible thing,
or if they are already in this visible thing
to prevent their progression through cultivation
than not tracing things to their origins.

In one who does not trace things to their origins,
the seven dimensions of awakening one's own wisdom
if not yet in this visible thing,
do not appear,
or if present in this visible thing
they do not progress through cultivation.

[75][pts] Beggars, I see no other single thing
more conducive to causing
the appearance of the seven dimensions of awakening one's own wisdom
if not yet in this visible thing,
or if they are already in this visible thing,
to cause their progression through cultivation
than tracing things to their origins.

In one who traces things to their origins,
the seven dimensions of awakening one's own wisdom
if not yet in this visible thing,
appear,
or, if present in this visible thing,
they progress through cultivation.

[76][pts] Of small measure, beggars,
is whatsoever loss
is connected to the loss of relatives.
The worst loss beggars,
is whatsoever loss
is connected to the loss of wisdom.[18]

[77][pts] Of small measure, beggars,
is whatsoever gain
is connected to the gain of relatives.
Foremost among gains, beggars,
is the gain of wisdom.

Wherefore, beggars,
train yourselves this way:
"Let us gain in wisdom!"
This is The Way to train yourselves.

[78][pts] Of small measure, beggars,
is whatsoever loss
is connected to the loss of possessions.
The worst loss beggars,
is whatsoever loss
is connected to the loss of wisdom.

[79][pts] Of small measure, beggars,
is whatsoever gain
is connected to the gain of possessions.
Foremost among gains, beggars,
is the gain of wisdom.

Wherefore, beggars,
train yourselves this way:
"Let us gain in wisdom!"
This is The Way to train yourselves.

[80][pts] Of small Measure, beggars,
is whatsoever loss
is connected to the loss of respect.
The worst loss, beggars,
is whatsoever loss
is connected to the loss of wisdom.

[81] [PTS IX] Of small measure, beggars,
is whatsoever gain
is connected to the gain of respect.
Foremost among gains, beggars
is the gain of wisdom.

Wherefore, beggars,
train yourselves this way:
"Let us gain in wisdom!"
This is The Way to train yourselves.

[82][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than carelessness.

Carelessness, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[83][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than being careful.

Being careful, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[84][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than idleness.

Idleness, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[85][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than energetic effort.

Energetic effort, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[86][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than much wishing.

Much wishing, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[87][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than little wishing.

Little wishing, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[88][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than discontent.

Discontent, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[89][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than contentment.

Contentment, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[90][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than not tracing things back to their origins.

Not tracing things back to their origins, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[91][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than tracing things back to their source.

Tracing things back to their source, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[92][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than not thinking things over.

Not thinking things over, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[93][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than thinking things over.

Thinking things over, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[94][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than keeping bad company.

Keeping bad company, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[95][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than keeping good company.

Keeping good company, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

[96][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great loss
than devotion to unskillful things
and lack of devotion to skillful things

Devotion to unskillful things
and lack of devotion to skillful things, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great loss.

[97][pts] Beggars! I see no other single thing
more conducive to great gain
than devotion to skillful things
and lack of devotion to unskillful things.

Devotion to skillful things
and lack of devotion to unskillful things, beggars,
is indeed conducive to great gain.

 


[1] This section deals with the Salayatana, The Realm of the Senses; The eye and sights, the ear and sounds, the nose and scents, the tongue and tastes, the body and touches, and the mind and ideas.

[2] Kamacchanda. pleasure-wishing. This section deals with the Sanyojana, the yokes to rebirth.

[3] Subha-Nimitta. the mark (as in signature), or sign of a thing.

[4] Yoniso manasikara. tracing or tracking [a thing] back in the mind to it's origins, or womb. I am now usually translating this term: 'Studious etiological examination.'

[5] Thina-middha. Words for 'fat' and 'conjealing'. Sloth and torpor. Especially with reference to having eaten as much as the belly will hold and then retiring to bed. Also mentioned elsewhere in the suttas as a cause of lazy ways: regret and poor posture.

[6] Uddhacca-Kukkucca. — say it out loud! Shuddering Shit — Coo-Coo Shit Crazy. Flurry and Worry. Fear and anxiety.

[7] Vicikiccha. = Re What? What? C-Cha = K-Kha, only human.

[8] The "indeed" here and in the following borrowed with gratitude from Woodward.]

[8a] I am omitting 'yoniso-manasikaroto'. I believe this is an error in the Pali. It is a carry over from the previous section and does not fit with the pattern of this section...and it doesn't make any sense unless given the currently standard translation 'thoroughgoing attention' (see Woodward's: AN I 17) which I think is a later (mis)understanding of this term. Another possibility is that this term does belong here and using metta to exterpate anger was the new addition.

[9] Dukkha.

[10] Avijja. Not-vision. Most often translated 'ignorance'. In this system it is not having seen, as it really is, the truth of the Four Aristocrats of Truths, it is not ignorance of them, but not seeing their validity.

[11] Cetasā ceto paricca pajānāmi.

[12] This simile is used to describe the state of Arahantship, the attainment of the highest goal in this system. See: The Pali Line: The 10th Question Part II: Samma Upekkha.

[13] Stage directions are an occasional feature of my translations as I believe the suttas are intended not only for reading and study, but also for delivery or enactment or demonstration.

[14] The idea expressed in this segment is of absolutely vital importance. It gives a clue to the fact that what we have in this system must be seen from a radically different position than that which we, in the West are raised to use. The proposition is exactly the opposite of the Freudian/Judeo/Christian view that the self is inherently corrupt and must be controlled from without. Ask yourself which of the two views allows for an individual to attain for himself (who else should one rely on?) uttermost freedom of mind.

[15] Pamada. See next.

[16] Appamāda. Don't spatter fat, Pater! See: Appamada.

[17] Satta Sambojjhanga.

[18] Pañña

 


Index to Anguttara Nikaya I: The Ekanipata Suttas ]


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