Khuddaka Nikaya


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PSALMS OF THE BRETHREN

Canto XVI. Psalms of Twenty Verses


 

Canto XVI.
Psalms of Twenty Verses

CCLIV
Bhaddiya, son of Kāḷī of the Godhas

Translated from the Pali by Mrs. C.A.F. Rhys Davids.

Public Domain

[Pali][than]

 

Reborn in this Buddha-age at Kapilavatthu in a clan of Sākiyan rajas,[1] he was named Bhaddiya. And when adult, he left the world together with Anuruddha and the other four nobles, while the Master was staying at the Mango Grove of Anupiyā. And entering the Order, he won arahantship. Him (as the result of a primeval vow and efforts on his part), the Master in conclave at Jeta Grove, ranked as the best among those bhikkhus who were of aristocratic birth.[2] And he, dwelling in the bliss of fruition, in the bliss of Nibbāna, while in the forest, beneath a tree, in any lonely spot, was ever breathing forth the exclamation: 'Ah, what happiness! ah, what happiness!' Now bhikkhus hearing him told the Master; to whom Bhaddiya, when summoned, admitted the habit, adding:'Formerly, lord, [316] when I was ruling my principality, I was well provided with protection, yet even so I was ever fearful, nervous, distrustful. But now that I have renounced all, I am no longer in that state.' And before the Master he uttered his 'lion's roar,' thus:

[842] What delicate gear was mine to wear,
When riding on my elephants,
What dainty fare was mine to eat,
Prepared by art from rice and flesh![3]

[843] To-day a happy winner,[4] stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[844] In cast-off rags attired, and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[845] Seeking his daily alms and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.[5]

[846] In triple robe, no more, and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[847] Taking each house in turn, and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[848] With one good meal a day,[6] and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[849] Eating from bowl alone and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[850] Refusing aftermeals and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[851] Haunting the lonely woods and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[317] [852] Sheltered by shade of tree[7] and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[853] 'Neath open sky, unsheltered, stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[854] Haunting the charnel-fields and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[855] Seated no matter where and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[856] Resting in sitting posture,[8] stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[857] Simple and few his wants and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[858] With mind content, serene, and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[859] Secluded, much alone and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[860] Detached, aloof [from men] and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[861] With surging energy[9] and stanch,
Pleased with what scraps his bowl is filled,
In contemplation, grasping nought,
Lives Bhaddiya, the Godha's son.

[862] Renouncing costly vessels wrought
In gold and lac, this earthen bowl
I grasped, and thus the second time
Anointment's consecration won.[10]

[863] Guarded by lofty circling walls,
And mighty gates with watchtowers high
And men-at-arms with sword in hand,
So was I wont in dread to dwell.

[318] [864] To-day a happy winner, see,
At ease, all fear and fright removed,
In forest meditation plunged
Dwells Bhaddiya the Godha's son.

[865] Firm planted on the moral code,
In clarity[11] and insight trained,
In due succession have I won[12]
Release with every fetter gone!

 


[1] I have not met elsewhere with the Godhas, but Kāḷī is recorded in Saŋy., v. 396, as having been honoured by a visit from the Master at Kapilavatthu, and commended for her confession of faith as a believer in the First Path (sotāpatti). She is spoken of as Kāḷigodha the Sākiyaṃ, and addressed as 'Godhe. It is not clear as to what was the political relation between rāja Bhaddiya and Suddhodana, who, in the Dīgha-Nikāya, is also termed simply rāja; not 'mahārāja,' as once in this Commentary. Cf. Rhys Davids Buddhist India, p. 19 ff. Bhaddiya's story occurs in Udāna, ii 10.

[2] Ang. Nik., i. 23. Such had greater difficulties to overcome. Cf. Sisters, verse 517; Majjh. Nik., iii. 129 f.

[3] The things specified are types of a life in all these respects luxurious (Commentary).

[4] There is here a word-play on bhadda-Bhaddiya.

[5] In every gāthā the three lines of refrain are to be understood. [Ed.: here completed]

[6] Ekāsanī: one 'sit-down meal' only in the day.

[7] I.e., instead of by a roof.

[8] Verses 844-856 enumerate twelve of the thirteen Dkutangas, or extra austerities, optional to bhikkhus. Enumerated in Milinda, ii. 268. Cf. Majjh. Nik., 77th Sutta.

[9] Verses 857-861 refer to practices incumbent on all bhikkhuṆ without option.

[10] Verse 97, spoken also bv an ex-prince.

[11] Sati, which is intelligent awareness. Cf. verse 794, n.

[12] On this 'succession,' see Rhys Davids, American Lectures, pp. 141-150.

 


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