Majjhima Nikaya


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Majjhima Nikāya
II. Majjhima Paṇṇāsa
2. Bhikkhu Vagga

Sacred Books of the Buddhists
Volume V
Dialogues of the Buddha
Part IV

Further Dialogues of the Buddha
Volume I

Translated from the Pali
by Lord Chalmers
G.C.B.
Sometime Governor of Ceylon

London
Humphrey Milford
Oxford University Press
1926
Public Domain

Sutta 69

Gulissāni Suttaɱ

Of Rusticity

 


[469] [332]

[1][pts][upal] THUS have I heard:

Once when the Lord was staying at Rājagaha in the Bamboo grove
where the squirrels are fed,
there appeared among the Confraternity
on some business or other
an uncouth Almsman from the wilds, named Gulissani,
concerning whom the reverend Sāriputta held forth to the Almsmen as follows:

An Almsman who comes in
from the wilds to the Confraternity
and lives with them
should show respect and consideration to his fellows in the higher life.

If he does not,
there will be talk
of what to do with his reverence from the wilds,
who has lived alone in his wilds
and done what he liked there,
and shows no respect [333] or consideration here
for his fellows in the higher life.

That is what will be said.

And therefore an Almsman from the wilds,
when he comes in to the Confraternity
and lives with them,
should show respect and consideration to his fellows.

Such an Almsman from the wilds
should be correct in the matter of seats,
punctilious neither to displace seniors
nor to oust juniors.

If he shows himself the reverse,
there will be talk of what to do
with this Almsman from the wilds
who is deficient even in the common decencies
which the Doctrine prescribes.

That is what will be said.

And therefore an Almsman from the wilds
when he comes in to the Confraternity
and lives with them,
should be correct in the matter of seats.

Similarly, and for the like reasons,
an Almsman from the wilds
should not visit the village for alms
at too early an hour,
nor return ahead of the others;
he ought not to call on families [470] either before
or after the midday meal;
he ought to be composed and sedate;
he ought to be reserved and not loquacious;
he ought to be pleasant spoken and amiable;
he ought to keep watch and ward over his faculties;
[471] he should be moderate in his eating,
ever vigilant,
strenuous,
mindful,
stedfast,
and profound in goodwill;
[472] he should be a zealous student
of the higher branches of the Doctrine and the Law.

He will be asked questions thereon,
and if he can find nothing to say,
there will be talk of what is to be done
with this Almsman from the wilds,
where he lived alone and did what he pleased,
who, on being asked questions about the higher branches of the Doctrine and the Law,
can find nothing to say.

That is what will be said.

And therefore an Almsman from the wilds
ought to be a zealous student
of the higher branches of the Doctrine and the Law.

For like reasons,
he ought to be a zealous student too
both of those excellent Deliverances
which transcend the visible
and are incorporeal,
and also of transcendental states of consciousness,
lest it be said of [334] him
that he knows nothing of that
for which he became a Pilgrim.

Hereupon, the reverend Mahā-Mogallāna asked the reverend Sāriputta
whether these states of consciousness
were incumbent only on an Almsman from the wilds
or [473] whether they were the business also
of an Almsman from the confines of a village.

They are incumbent on the Almsman from the wilds, sir,
and still more are they the business of an Almsman
from the confines of a village.


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