Anguttara Nikaya


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Aŋguttaranikāyo
Catukkanipāto
XIX: Yodhajīva Vagga

The Book of the Gradual Sayings
The Book of the Fours
Chapter XIX: Fignthing Man

Sutta 185

Samaṇa
aka
Brāhmaṇa-Sacca Suttaɱ
aka
Catukoṭika-Suññatā Suttaɱ

Brāhmin Truths[1]

Translated from the Pali by F. L. Woodward, M.A.

Copyright The Pali Text Society
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[1] Thus have I heard:

On a certain occasion the Exalted One was staying near Rājagaha on Vultures' Peak Hill.

Now at that time
a great number of notable Wanderers
were abiding on the bank of Snake River[2]
in the Wanderers' Park,
to wit:

Annabhāra,
Varadhara,
Sakuludāyin
and other notable Wanderers.

Now at eventide the Exalted One,
arising from his solitary musing,
went towards the bank of Snake River,
where was the Wanderers' Park.

On that occasion,
among those Wanderers holding other views,
as they sat gathered together,
this subject of talk chanced to arise:

Such and such are the brahmin truths.

Such and such are the brahmin truths.[3]

Now when the Exalted One reached those Wanderers,
on [183] coming to them
he sat down on a seat made ready.

When he had sat down
the Exalted One said this to those Wanderers:

'Pray, Wanderers,
on what subject of talk
were ye engaged just now
as ye sit here gathered together?

What was the subject of talk
ye have just now broken off?

'As to that, Master Gotama,
as we sat here gathered together,
the subject of talk that chanced to arise
was this:

Such and such are the brahmin truths.

Such and such are the brahmin truths.'

'Well, Wanderers,
these four brahmin truths
have been set forth by myself
after fully comprehending
and realizing them for myself.

What four?

In this case, Wanderers,
the brahmin[4] says thus:

"All living things
are not to be harmed."[5]

So saying, a brahmin speaks truth,
not falsehood.

Therein he has no conceit of
"recluse"
or "brahmin."

He has no conceit of
"better am I,"
"equal am I,"
"inferior am I."

Moreover by fully comprehending
the truth contained in that saying
he is bent on the practice
of mercy and compassion
for all living things.

Again, Wanderers,
the brahmin says thus:

"All sense-delights are impermanent,
painful,
of a nature to change."

So saying, a brahmin speaks truth,
not falsehood.

Therein he has no conceit of
"recluse"
or "brahmin."

He has no conceit of
"better am I,"
"equal am I,"
"inferior am I."

Moreover by fully comprehending
the truth contained in that saying
he is bent on the practice
of distaste for sense-delights,
for passionlessness,
for making an end thereof.

Again, Wanderers, the brahmin says thus:

"All becomings are impermanent, painful, of a nature to change."

So saying, a brahmin speaks truth,
not falsehood.

Therein he has no conceit of
"recluse"
or "brahmin."

He has no conceit of
"better am I,"
"equal am I,"
"inferior am I."

Moreover, by fully comprehending
the truth contained in that saying,
he is bent on the practice
of distaste for sense-delights,
for passionlessness,
for making an end thereof.

Yet again, Wanderers, the brahmin says thus:

"I have no [184] part in anything anywhere,
and herein for me
there is no attachment to anything."[6]

So saying, a brahmin speaks truth,
not falsehood.

Therein he has no conceit of
"recluse"
or "brahmin."

He has no conceit of
"better am I,"
"equal am I,"
"inferior am I."

Moreover, by fully comprehending
the truth contained in that saying
he is bent on the practice
of having nothing at all.[7]

So these, Wanderers,
are the four brahmin truths
put forth by myself
after fully comprehending
and realizing them myself.'

 


[1] Uddāna calls it Samaṇa-.

[2] Cf. supra, text 29.

[3] Five are set forth at M. ii, 199 - viz., truth, austerity, the good life, study and liberality. They admit that no one has realized all five for seven generations back. The Buddha then sets forth his own way to Brahma - viz., the four Brahma-viharas or God-moods.

[4] -= khīnāsava. Comy.

[5] Avajjhā. Text strangely reads avijjā (?).

[6] Nāhaɱ kvacani kassaci kiñcana; tasmiɱ na ca mama kvacani katthaci kiñcanaɱ n'atthi (as at A. i, 206 = G.S. i, 186). Kiñcana (hindrance or paḷibodha) is def. at Netti, 62 as rāga-moha-dosa. Cf. VdA. 119, 386; VM. ii, 654.

[7] Ākiñcañña. Cf. K.S. iv, 205 n.


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