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Index to the Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Khandha Vagga,
Ditthi Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

III. Khandha Vagga

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 3, Khandha-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1890. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 3, Khandha-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Sister Upalavanna, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on Elements, translated by Mrs. Rhys Davids assisted by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Book of the Aggregates, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
BD: The translations of M. Olds
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight.

III. Ditthi Saɱyutta, III.202

Note: This entire samyutta should be read alongside Dīgha Nikāya 1, the sections on Higher Dhamma Speculations where not only is the view itself given but also a more detailed description of how the view is arrived at.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on Views, III.164
WP: Connected Discourses on Views, I.991

III.I. Sotāpatti Vagga, III.202

1. Vāta Suttaɱ, III.202

The Buddha states that the view that the world and the things of the world are static arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: Wind, III.164
WP: Winds, I.991

2. Etaɱ Mama Suttaɱ, III.203

The Buddha states that the view that some thing belongs to the self, or that some thing is the self arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: This is Mine, III.165
WP: This is Mine, I.992

3. So Attā Suttaɱ, III.204

The Buddha states that the view that that which is the self and that which is the world for one will become stable in the hereafter arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: That is the Self, III.166
WP: The Self, I.992

4. No ca Me Siyā Suttaɱ, III.205

The Buddha states that the view that had it not been considered as belonging to the self in the past, it would not be considered as belonging to the self in the present, that if it is not considered the self in the present it will not be considered self in the future arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
This is the same 'view' as stated in SN 3.22.81 and SN 3.22.152. Here the saying is to be understood as a point of view whereas elsewhere it is to be used as an aspiration. "Had this not been considered mine in the past, it would not be considered mine in the present, if it is not considered mine in the present it will not be considered mine in the future" vs "Having considered this as mine in the past I experience it as mine in the present, let me not consider this mine in the present so that it will not be considered mine in the future." Somehow constructed so that both meanings are seen in the identical wording.

PTS: It May Not Be Mine, III.166
WP: It Might Not Be For Me, I.993

5. N'atthi Suttaɱ, III.206

The Buddha states that the view that there is no such thing as kamma and it's results arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
The full statement of the view is (Bhk. Bodhi's translation, for comparison; see also DN 2 (Rhys Davids):
"There is nothing given, nothing offered, nothing presented in charity; no fruit or result of good and bad actions; no this world, no other world; no mother, no father; no beings who are reborn spontaneously; no ascetics and brahmins faring and practising rightly in the world who, having realized this world and the other world for themselves by direct knowledge, make them known to others. This person consists of the four great elements. When one dies, earth returns to and merges with the earth-body; water returns to and merges with the water-body; fire returns to and merges with the fire-body; air returns to and merges with the air-body; the faculties are transferred to space. [Four] men with the bier as fifth carry away the corpse. The funeral orations last as far as the charnel ground; the bones whiten; burnt offerings end with ashes. Giving is a doctrine of fools. When anyone asserts the doctrine that there is [giving and the like], it is empty, false prattle. Fools and the wise are alike cut off and perish with the breakup of the body; after death they do not exist."
At least here today [USA Monday, February 09, 2015 6:21 AM] the popular belief has not gone as far as to deny the existence of mothers and fathers, and Giving is still a much valued if often abused and misdirected practice.
This view is often stated as the belief that 'there is not,' and is what is often cited when the term 'micchā-ditthi' (mistaken views) is used.

PTS: There is Not, III.166
WP: There Is Not, I.993

6. Karoto Suttaɱ, III.208

The Buddha states that the view that there is no such thing as good and evil deeds arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
The view of Pūraṇa Kassapa, on the ineffectiveness of action in the production of consequences.
Bhk. Bodhi's translation of this view:
"When one acts or makes others act, when one mutilates or makes others mutilate, when one tortures or makes others inflict torture, when one inflicts sorrow or makes others inflict sorrow, when one oppresses or makes others inflict oppression, when one intimidates or makes others inflict intimidation, when one destroys life, takes what is not given, breks into houses, plunders wealth, commits burglary, ambushes highways, seduces another's wife, utters falsehood — no evil is done by the doer. If, with a razor-rimmed wheel, one were to make the living beings of this earth into one mass of flesh, into one heap of flesh, because of this there would be no evil and no outcome of evil. If one were to go along the south bank of the Ganges killing and slaughtering, mutilating and making others mutilate, torturning and making others inflict torture, because of this there would be no evil and no outcome of evil. If one were to go along the north bank of the Ganges giving gifts and making others give gifts, making offerings and making others make offerings, because of this there would be no merit and no outcome of merit. By giving, by taming oneself, by self-control, by speaking truth, there is no merit and no outcome of merit."
These views are not the products of simple-minded fools. They are arrived at at a point in deep meditative trances where the atomic nature of things is seen and the conclusion is reached that there is no individuality or even reality to anything and that the world is in fact a static illusion.

PTS: For Him Who Acts, III.168
WP: Acting, I.994

7. Hetu Suttaɱ, III.210

The Buddha states that the view that there is no such thing as driving forces and their results (kamma) arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
Bhk. Bodhi's translation of this view:
"There is no cause or condition for the defilement of beings; beings are defiled without cause or condition. There is no cause or condition for the purification of beings; beings are purified without cause or condition [There is no action by self, no action by others, no manly action.] There is no power, no energy, no manly strength, no manly endurance. All beings, all living beings, all creatures, all souls are without mastery, power, and energy; moulded by destiny, circumstance, and nature, they experience pleasure and pain in the six classes."
Note here Woodward translates 'hetu' (usually 'cause', but literally 'driving force' as in the force used by the driver to get the ox to move the cart along) as 'condion' and 'paccaya' (usually 'condition', but better as 'result', or 'repercussion') as 'cause'.

PTS: Condition, III.169
WP: Cause, I.995

8. Mahā Diṭṭhi Suttaɱ, III.211

The Buddha states that the view that the elements are neither made nor caused to be made, that there is no such thing as kamma, and that the world is an illusion arising from a static reality arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
A long, mad, rambling point of view similar to the previous two proposed by Pakudha Kaccāyana and expounded by Makkhali of the Cow-pen.
Note: Woodward here translates 'diṭṭhi' as heresy. This is not a correct translation, but is an interpretation put on the word when used of certain views. From the Buddhist perspective all views are essentially incorrect. Sammā Diṭṭhi (right view, or, better, consummate or high view) is 'high' or 'consummate' only in so far as it serves the goal. Similarly one must understand 'sammā diṭṭhi' as a view from the perspective of its goal or it becomes at least partially incorrect.
Again perceptions giving rise to views of the sort found in the last three suttas can be encountered by any meditator. The world is seen as arising images, then vibrating atoms and then even the vibration stops as well and it is very easy to conclude that there is no existing as a living being and that therefore there is no doing evil or good deeds as it is just illusions passing through illusions. It is for this reason that a thorough understanding that kamma is action based on intent is so important. Real or not, intentional acts produce subjectively experienced results, and that is as good as saying that the consensus reality must be respected and dealt with as it is subjectively experienced by the ordinary common man and that being the case the view that 'it exists' cannot be rationally denied even when it cannot be rationally aserted.

PTS: By the (Great) Heresy, III.170
WP: The Great View, I.995

9. Sassata Loka Suttaɱ, III.213

The Buddha states that the view that the world is eternal arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The World is Eternal, III.172
WP: The World Is Eternal, I.997

10. Asassata Loka Suttaɱ, III.214

The Buddha states that the view that the world is not eternal arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The World is Not Eternal, III.172
WP: The World is not Eternal, I.997

11. Antavā Suttaɱ, III.214

The Buddha states that the view that the world ends arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
'Anta' is 'end' or 'preceding' or 'after' or 'opposite' (as in antler, ante-), but can mean 'limit' or (as per Bhk. Bodhi) 'finite'. PED: 'What faces one at the start' which is a good way to access the point of view mentioned in this sutta — looking out (in your mind's eye) from your face as you sit, see how you can view the world as an ending thing or an endless thing. Is it coming to an end at your face, or is it just taking off from there?

PTS: Limited (is the World), III.172
WP: The World is Finite, I.997

12. Anantavā Suttaɱ, III.215

The Buddha states that the view that the world is endless arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: Unlimited (is the world), III.172
WP: The World is Infinite, I.997

13. Taŋ Jīvan, Taŋ Sarīra Suttaɱ, III.215

The Buddha states that the view that that which is the body is that which is life arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.
Bhk. Bodhi translates 'jīva' here and in the next sutta as 'soul'. 'Jīva' is usually just 'life' and the term most usually used for what we understand as 'soul' is the Pali 'attan' (where PED states 'Vedic ātman, not to Gr. a)\nemos = Latin animus, but to Gr. a)tmo/s steam, Ohg. ātum breath, Ags. aepm.'
The question is: Is this a point of view concerning the soul, or life, or individuality? It's probably best to reserve judgment and consider it as dealing with all three.

PTS: What the Life Is, That Is the Body, III.172
WP: Soul and Body Are the Same, I.998

14. Aññaŋ Jīvan, Aññaŋ Sarīra Suttaɱ, III.215

The Buddha states that the view that that which is the body is something other than that which is life arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Life is One Thing, the Body is Another, III.172
WP: Soul and Body Are Different, I.998

15. Hoti Tathāgata Suttaɱ, III.215

The Buddha states that the view that the Thathagata (one who has attained the goal) exists arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Tathāgata Exists, III.172
WP: The Tathagata Exists, I.998

16. Na Hoti Tathāgata Suttaɱ, III.215

The Buddha states that the view that the Thathagata (one who has attained the goal) does not exist arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Tathāgata Exists Not, III.172
WP: The Tathagata Does Not Exist, I.998

17. Hoti ca na ca Hoti Tathāgata Suttaɱ, III.215

The Buddha states that the view that the Thathagata (one who has attained the goal) both exists and does not exist arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Tathāgata both Exists and Exists Not, III.172
WP: The Tathagata Both Exists and Does Not Exist, I.999

18. N'eva Hoti na na Hoti Tathāgata Suttaɱ, III.216

The Buddha states that the view that the Thathagata (one who has attained the goal) neither exists nor does not exist arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Tathagata Neither Exists nor Exists Not, III.172
WP: The Tathagata Neither Exists Nor Does Not Exist, I.999

III.II.1: Purimagamanam (aṭṭhārasa-veyyākaraṇāni),

[Note: As this Chapter is identical to the previous (Suttas 1-18) it has been abridged by the inclusion of the first and last suttas (19 and 36) in their complete form and Suttas 20-35 are given by title only but are linked to their corresponding sutta in the previous Chapter.]
I justify this abridgment (and the two others below which follow the same pattern) where not abridging the suttas has been a policy here because these suttas are not the usual form of repetition as found in a wheel where there is always a small change made in each sutta, but are verbatum repetitions of the previous suttas. In other words, these repetitions are exactly what they state they are: repetitions. We likely have here an example of the way the suttas were memorized.

PTS: (First Repetition (of the Eighteen Instructions), I.56

 

19. Vātā Suttaɱ, III.217

PTS: Winds, III.173
WP: Winds, I.1000

20-35. Purimagamanāhi aṭṭhārasaveyyākaraṇāni vitthārānīti, (same as previous section), III.218

PTS: (ĪĪ 20-35) III.173
WP: 20-36: This is Mine, Etc., I.1000

36. Neva Hoti na na Hoti Tathāgata Suttaɱ, III.218

PTS: Neither exists nor exists not, III.173

III.II.2: Dutiyagamanam (or Dutiyavāro) (Second Repetition) (WP omits section break), III.218

[Note: This chapter is called 'Second Repetition', but it is not a repetition, it is a variation with a different set of 'views' placed into the same form as the previous suttas in the chapter. Therefore the suttas are presented in individual files, unabridged.]

 

37. Rūpī Attā Suttaɱ, III.218

The Buddha states that the view that the self has shape and is not diseased after death arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self has Form, III.174
WP: A Self Consisting of Form, I.1000

38. Arūpī Attā Suttaɱ, III.219

The Buddha states that the view that the self is without shape and is not diseased after death arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self is Formless, III.174
WP: A Formless Self, I.1001

39. Rūpī ca Arūpī Attā Suttaɱ, III.219

The Buddha states that the view that the self both has shape and is without shape and is not diseased after death arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self Both has Form and Is Formless, III.174
WP: A Self Both Consisting of Form and Formless, I.1001

40. N'eva Rūpī N'ārūpī Attā Suttaɱ, III.219

The Buddha states that the view that the self neither has shape nor is without shape and is not diseased after death arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self Neither has Form Nor Is Formless, III.174
WP: A Self Neither Consisting of Form nor Formess, I.1001

41. Ekanta-sukhī Suttaɱ, III.219

The Buddha states that the view that the self is only pleasurable after death and is not diseased arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self Is Sheer Bliss, III.174
WP: Exclusively Happy, I.1001

42. Ekanta-dukkhī Suttaɱ, III.220

The Buddha states that the view that the self is only painful after death and is not diseased arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self Is Sheer Suffering, III.174
WP: Exclusively Miserable, I.1001

43. Sukha-dukkhī Suttaɱ, III.220

The Buddha states that the view that the self is both pleasurable and painful after death and is not diseased arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self Is Bliss and Suffering, III.174
WP: Both Happy and Miserable, I.1001

44. Adukkham-asukhī Suttaɱ, III.220

The Buddha states that the view that the self is not painful but not pleasurable after death and is not diseased arises from not understanding the impermanent and painful nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness and the seen, heard, sensed, cognized, acquired, investigated, or turned over in mind.

PTS: The Self Is without Bliss or Suffering, III.174
WP: Neither Happy nor Miserable, I.1001

III.III: Tatiyagamanam, (Third Repetition), III.221

[Note: As the suttas of this Chapter are identical to the previous Suttas 1-18 and 37-44 of the Diṭṭhi Saŋyutta it has been abridged here by the inclusion of the first and last suttas (45 and 70) in their complete form and Suttas 46-69 are given by title only but are linked to their corresponding sutta in the previous Chapters.]

 

45. Vāta Suttaɱ, III.221

PTS: WindsIII.175
WP: Winds, I.1002

46-69., III.221

PTS: Ī46-69 III.175
WP: 46-70: This Is Mine, Etc., I.1002

70. Adukkha-Asukhī Suttaɱ, III.222

PTS: The Self Is without Bliss or Suffering, III.175

III.IV: Catutthagamanam, (Fourth Repetition), III.222

This group is identical to the previous group. I have just duplicated the previous file and changed the numbers and title. It is not at all clear to me why this group is included. The scheme is complete as: I:19-36 = repetition of 1-18; i: 37-44 (originals); II:45-70: repetition of 1-18 + 37-44. Otherwise the more balanced scheme would be: I:1-18; i: 37-44; II: 1-18 + 37-44, or, if the point really is repetition: I:1-18; i:repetition of 1-18; II: 37-44; IV:repetition of 37-44; IV: repetition of 1-18 + 37-44.

71. Vāta Suttaɱ, III.221

PTS: WindsIII.175
WP: Winds, I.1002

72-95., III.221

PTS: Ī72-95 III.175

96. Adukkha-Asukhī Suttaɱ, III.222

PTS: The Self Is without Bliss or Suffering, III.175
WP: This Is Mine, Etc., I.1003


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Khandhasamyutta]  [Radhasamyutta]  [Ditthisamyutta]  [Okkantikasamyutta]  [Uppadasamyutta]  [Kilesasamyutta]  [Sariputtasamyutta]  [Nagasamyutta]  [Supannasamyutta]  [Gandhabbakayasamyutta]  [Valahasamyutta]  [Vacchagottasamyutta]  [Jhana- (or Samadhi-) samyutta]

 


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