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Index to the Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Saḷāyatana Vagga
Moggallana Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 4, Saḷāyatana-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1894. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 4, Saḷāyatana-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on the Sixfold Sphere of Sense and Other Subjects, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Book of the Six Sense Bases, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight.
BD: The translations of M. Olds

VI. Moggallana Saɱyutta, III.202

PTS: The Kindred Sayings about Moggallana, IV.179
WP: Connected Discourses with Moggallana, II.1302

 

1. Savitakka Suttaɱ, IV.262

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called the First Jhana.

PTS: Together with Thought Directed, IV.179
BD: With Thinking
WP: The First Jhana, II.1302
Discussion

2. Avitakka Suttaɱ, IV.263

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called the Second Jhana.
Most of the remarks regarding the previous sutta apply also to this one. With regard specifically to the second jhāna is my objection to translating the word 'samādhi' as concentration. Samādhi is not just concentration, it is the serene state of one who has developed the whole spectrum of attainments from giving to ethical conduct to self-control to development of mind and the factors as described within the jhānas, and characterized by the individual having no ambitions, having no sign of lust, hate or ignorance, and being empty of lust, hate and ignorance. In the first and second jhāna samādhi is only just beginning it's higher development.

PTS: Without Directed Thought, IV.180
BD: Without Thinking
WP: The Second Jhana, II.1303

3. Sukhena Suttaɱ, IV.264

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called the Third Jhana.

PTS: By Happiness, IV.
BD: The Pleasant Abiding
WP: The Third Jhana, II.1303

4. Upekkhako Suttaɱ, IV.265

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called the Fourth Jhana.
Woodward has for Upekkhā-sati-pārisuddhiɱ. "a state of perfect purity of balance and equanimity," which either ignores 'sati' or (unlikely) translates it as 'balance.' I argue that 'upekkhā', usually translated 'equanimity' should be translated 'detachment'. PED: "looking on", hedonic neutrality or indifference, zero point between joy and sorrow ... disinterestedness, neutral feeling, equanimity. Sometimes equivalent to adukkham-asukha-vedanā "feeling which is neither pain nor pleasure". (Which is the 'vedanā' of the Arahant, or the equivalent of Nibbāna.'Upekkhā' is also the equivalent of 'vimutti', 'freedom,' which is also the equivalent of Nibbāna.) I except "equanimity". Equanimity is a state of impassivity which is a precurser to detachment (see the Sixth Sambojjhanga) and is a state which is still involved with the world. The goal is a state that is at least temporarily not involved with the world.

PTS: Balanced, IV.181
BD: Detached
WP: The Fourth Jhana, II.1304

5. Ākāsānañcāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.266

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called the Realm of Space.

PTS: Space, IV.182
BD: The Realm of Endless Space
WP: The Base of the Infinity of Space, II.1305

6. Viññānañcāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.266

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called the Realm of Consciousness.

PTS: Consciousness, IV.183
BD: The Realm of Endless Consciousness
WP: The Base of the Infinity of Consciousness, II.1306

7. Ākiñcaññāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.267

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called The Realm of Naught Whose-Whatever.
My translation of this is just a stab in the dark. The current translation based on the idea of nothingness seems to miss the point: the idea is not that there is nothing, but that there is nothing there that can be had, or owned; or alternatively that there is nothing there that causes the obstructions lust, hate and delusion or that there is nothing there of the obstructions lust, hate and delusion. The one thing that is reasonably certain is that the meaning is not 'nothingness'. Lately I have considered the idea that this is a realm based on the perception that there is nothing real there.

PTS: Nothingness, IV.183
BD: The Realm of Naught Whose-Whatever
WP: The Base of Nothingness, II.1306

8. N'evasaññānāsaññāyatana Suttaɱ, IV.268

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called The Realm of Neither-perception-nor-non-perception.

PTS: Neither-perceiving-nor-non-perceiving, IV.184
BD: The Realm of Neither-perception-nor-non-perception
WP: The Base of Neither-Perception-Nor-Nonperception, II.1307

9. Animitta Suttaɱ, IV.268

Moggallana The Great, one of the two most powerful of the Buddha's followers, and the one whose strong point was magic power, describes his first attempts to master the the level of meditation practice called Signless Serenity of Heart.
Still another term translated 'conditioned'. So when you see this word you need to look up the Pali. If it is 'Nidāna' it means 'tied to' 'bound up with'; if it is 'paṭicca' it means 'depending on', if it is 'sankhara' it means 'own-made or constructed' if it is 'nimitta' it means 'signs, signatures, marks'. 'The Unconditioned' is also the mistranslation used to describe Nibbāna, and the Signless is not yet Nibbāna. Bhk. Bodhi: 'signless concentration of mind'. What signs does one not dwell on? Pleasant or unpleasant features of things. The idea is not non-perception of objects, it is the state arrived at when not dwelling on the pleasant or unpleasant features of objects to the extent that lust, hate, or delusion arises. Lust, Hate and Delusion leave signs so the state arrived at is one in which no signs of these things are left. And that doesn't mean one covers one's tracks well, it means one leaves no track because those things do not exist in one there!

PTS: The Unconditioned, IV.185
BD: The Realm of Neither-perception-nor-non-perception
WP: The Signless, II.1308

10. Sakka Suttaɱ, IV.269

Moggallana visits the Tavatimsa Realm and delivers an hypnotic spell in praise of the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha to Sakka and five hundred other devas. Sakka replies repeating the spell back to Moggallana. Sakka then returns four more times with incresing numbers of devas. The same events are repeated with a variation on the spell.
As far as I am concerned there is no longer any doubt that these long repetititititive suttas at the conclusion of chapters are genuine hypnotic spells constructed to be delivered in full and which result in transporting the mind of the listener into higher dimensions. An invaluable glympse into old-time magic spells and dhamma teaching techniques. The translation is fully rolled out, the Pali I have left abridged but formatted for greater clarity.

PTS: Sakka, IV.185
WP: Sakka, II.1308

11. Candano Suttaɱ, IV.280

Moggallana visits the Tavatiɱsa Realm and delivers an hypnotic spell in praise of the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha to Candano, Suyāmo, Santusito, Sunimmito, and Vasavatti.
This should probably be 5 different Suttas, each identical to SN 4.40.10 with only the name of the deva changed. This is represented in the Pali only by the names of the devas and an indication that the previous sutta should be repeated with changes. As this is a separate file, I have reconstructed the first set with the changed name. With only my patchwork knowledge of Pali I may not have got the proper endings for the names in all cases in the Pali.

PTS: Candana, IV.189
WP: Candana, II.1313
This should probably be five separate suttas:
Candano
Suyāmo
Santusito
Sunimmito
Vasavatti


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