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Index to the Suttas of the Sa.myutta Nikaaya
Khandha Vagga,
Khandha Sa.myutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

III. Khandha Vagga

PTS: Sa.myutta Nikaaya Volume 3, Khandha-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1890. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Sa.myutta Nikaaya Volume 3, Khandha-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Sister Upalavanna, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on Elements, translated by Mrs. Rhys Davids assisted by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Book of the Aggregates, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
BD: The translations of M. Olds
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight.

I. Khandha Sa.myutta, III.1

PTS: The Kindred Sayings on Elements, III.1
WP: Connected Discourses on the Aggregates, I.827

I. Mulapannasa, I.

I.I. Nakulapita Vagga, III.1

[1] Nakulapitaa Sutta.m, III.1

The Buddha comforts a broken down old man.

PTS: Nakulapitar, III.1
WP: Nakulapita, I.853
ATI: To Nakulapita
Buddhism in Translations, SN 22.1: Can the Saint Suffer? (excerpt) Warren, trans.

[2] Devadaha Sutta.m, III.5

Sariputta teaches a number of bhikkhus what to respond when asked what the Buddha Teaches.

PTS: Devadaha, III.6
WP: At Devadaha, I.856
ATI: At Devadaha

[3] Haaliddikaani Sutta.m, III.9

Maha Kaccana explains in detail the meaning of a saying made in brief by the Buddha.

PTS: Haaliddikaani, III.10
WP: Haaliddikaani, I.859
ATI: To Haliddakani

[4] Dutiya Haliddikaani Sutta.m, III.12

Maha Kaccana explains in detail the meaning of a saying made in brief by the Buddha.

PTS: Haaliddikaani 2, III.14
WP: Haaliddikaani 2, I.862

[5] Samaadhi Sutta.m, III.13

The Buddha instructs the bhikkhus to develop serenity for seeing the origin and ending of form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.
Note in my translation the use of 'counterpart' as a translation for 'pa.ticca' in an effort to get away from 'cause' and even 'condition'; the use of 'serenity' for 'samaadhi' in order to point to the fact that samaadhi is more than just concentration; and the use of 'arising to self' for 'samudaya' in an effort to point out the 'sam' that seldom appears in the translation of this term. What the Buddha is always talking about is not the original creation of things, but the identified-with existence of things. Form has existence only in so far as it is experienced by an individual. That does not mean that the individual is creating form. It only means that the individual has created the experience of form. 'It is the diversity of data that results in the diversity of perceptions; it is not the diversity of perceptions that results in the diversity of data. SN 2.14.8 - olds

PTS: Concentration, III.15
WP: Concentration, I.863
ATI: Concentration, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Serenity, Olds, trans.
Discussion

[6] Pa.tisallaa.naa Sutta.m, III.15

The Buddha instructs the bhikkhus to develop solitude for seeing the origin and ending of form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Solitude, III.16
WP: Seclusion, I.864

[7] Pa.thama Upaadaa-Paritassanaa Sutta.m, III.15

The Buddha explains how it is that a person who thinks of body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as self, or in self or as of self, has anxiety and agitation about self when these things change.

PTS: Grasping and worry, III.16
WP: Agitation through Clinging 1, I.865

[8] Dutiya Upaadaa-Paritassanaa Sutta.m, III.18

The Buddha explains how it is that a person who thinks of body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as me or mine, or self, has anxiety and agitation about self when these things change.

PTS: Grasping and worry 2, III.18
WP: Agitation through Clinging 2, I.866

[9] Pa.thama Atiitaanaagata-Paccuppanna Sutta.m, III.19

The Buddha points out that form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness were unstable in the past, will be unstable the future and are unstable in the present and that therefore the wise person practices to let these things go.
Note the order: Past, Future, Present. This is the order used throughout the suttas (in spite of some translations indicating otherwise). The reason is to be found in the understanding of the nature of mind to proceed according to instructions. Think of the way a search tool looks for what is saught as literally described. [First examine the past, then examine the future, then examine the present.] We do not want it dwelling in the past or anticipating the future, so we direct the mind to reflection on the way things were in the past, then the way things will be in the future, then set it down to reflect on the way things are in the present. Also note that there is no actual term in Pali for 'the present'. Here it is Paccuppanna 'that which confronts' or has risen up in our face, literally the 'percussively-uprisen'. Elsewhere it is 'di.t.tha-dhamma' this 'seen thing'. The reason? Change is seen to make it impossible to locate any point in time that could be called a 'present moment'. Even in that which confronts us different objects are changing at different rates and further, by the nature of perception being consequent on contact giving rise to consciousness, all that which we understand to be 'the present' is really already in the past.

PTS: Past, future and present, III.18
WP: Impermanent in the Three Times, I.867

[10] Dutiya Atiitaanaagata-Paccuppanna Sutta.m, III.19

The Buddha points out that form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness were painful in the past, will be painful the future and are painful in the present and that therefore the wise person practices to let these things go.

PTS: Past, future and present 2, III.19
WP: Suffering in the Three Times, I.867

[11] Tatiya Atiitaanaagata-Paccuppanna Sutta.m, III.20

The Buddha points out that form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness were not-self in the past, will be not-self the future and are not-self in the present and that therefore the wise person practices to let these things go.

PTS: Past, future and present 2[sic], III.19
WP: Nonself in the Three Times

I.II. Anicca Vagga, III.21

[12] Anicca Sutta.m, III.21

The Buddha teaches that seeing form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as impermanent is sufficient to be repelled by them and that being repelled one is free.

PTS: Impermanence, III.20
WP: Impermanent, I.868

[13] Dukkha Sutta.m, III.21

The Buddha teaches that seeing form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as painful is sufficient to be repelled by them and that being repelled one is free.

PTS: Ill, III.20
WP: Suffering, I.868

[14] Anatta Sutta.m, III.21

The Buddha teaches that seeing form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as without the self is sufficient to be repelled by them and that being repelled one is free.

PTS: Without the Self, III.21
WP: Nonself, I.869

[15] Pa.thama Yad Anicca Sutta.m, III.22

The Buddha teaches that that which is impermanent is painful and that which is painful should not be regarded as the self. So seeing form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness is sufficient to be repelled by them and that being repelled one is free.

PTS: What is Impermanent (1), III.21
WP: What is Impermanent, 869

[16] Dutiya Yad Anicca Sutta.m, aka Ya.m Dukkha Sutta.m, III.22

The Buddha teaches that that which is painful is not self and that which is not self and should not be regarded as the self. So seeing form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness is sufficient to be repelled by them and that being repelled one is free.

PTS: What is Impermanent 2, III.22
WP: What is Suffering, I.869

[17] Tatiya Yad Anatta Sutta.m aka Tatiya Yad Anicca, III.22

The Buddha teaches that that which is not self should not be regarded as the self. So seeing form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness is sufficient to be repelled by them and that being repelled one is free.
Form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are not self. They are not self because they are painful. They are painful because they are inconstant.

PTS: What is Impermanent 3, III.22
WP: What is Nonself, I.870

[18] Pa.thama Hetu Sutta.m, III.23

The Buddha teaches the understanding that a thing built on the changeable is itself subject to change.
See Glossology: 'hetu', for a discussion as to why this term should not be being translated 'cause' as per Woodward and most other translators.

PTS: Cause (1), III.22
WP: Impermanent with Cause, I.870

[19] Dutiya Hetu Sutta.m, III.23

The Buddha teaches the understanding that a thing built of the painful does not result in the pleasant.

PTS: Cause 2, III.22
WP: Suffering with Cause, I.870

[20] Tatiya Hetu Sutta.m, III.24

The Buddha teaches the understanding that a thing built of the not-self does not become a self.
The BJT Pali has apparently used copy and paste but forgot to make the appropriate changes. Woodward does a similar thing in not making the appropriate changes in the second and third of the previous three. The PTS Pali is correct although abridged; I have unabridged the Pali and corrected the Woodward.

PTS: Cause 3, III.23
WP: Nonself with Cause, I.871

[21] Aananda Sutta.m, III.24

The Buddha explains to Ananda that the saying of seers of old 'Its Ending! Its Ending!' points to the perception that form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consiousness are ending things.

PTS: Aananda, III.23
WP: Aananda, I.871

I.III. Bhaara Vagga, III.25

[22] Bhaara Sutta.m, III.25

The Buddha teaches that the five stockpiles (khandha: body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness) amount to a burden, that the asumption of individuality can be termed the grasping of the burden, that desire for experience through the senses, desire to be, and the desire for more being, un-being, or re-being is the lifting up of the burden, and that the laying down of the burden is the utter eradication of desire.
This sutta has sparked extra interest by the translators because of an assumption made by an early western commentator (as noted in a footnote on the Woodward translation) that where there is a grabing hold, taking up, and laying down, there must be a grabber, a take-holder, and a let-goer and that therefore this sutta proves that the Buddha taught the existence of a being outside the khandhas. This is the error of reading into what one reads what is not written into what one is reading. The Buddha did not teach the non-existence of the self, but neither did he teach the existence of the self. What he taught was the process that results in existence and that the problem with existence was the fact of its coming to an end, and this, and only this is what is taught in this sutta.
There is a problem for translators in translation of the term 'vibhava'. VI = re, un, and 2: re-in the sense of doubling or increase; BHAVA = being, living, existing. Woodward assumes that any meaning other than 'un' for this word is a later development. I am not sure there is a good basis for that assumption. It is equally possible that Gotama chose that term precisely because of it's multiple meanings.

PTS: The Burden, III.24
WP: The Burden, I.871
ATI: The Burden
Buddhism in Translations: The Origin and Cessation of the Human Being. Warren, trans.
BPS: The Burden, Walshe, trans.

[23] Pari~n~naa Sutta.m, III.26

The Buddha teaches that what is to be understood is body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness and what is called understanding is having completely eradicated lust, hatred and blindness.
Another way of saying this is that until you have completely eliminated lust, anger and blindness you have not yet fully understood body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Understanding, III.26
WP: Full Understanding, I.872
ATI: Comprehension

[24] Parijaana.m or Abhijaana Sutta.m, III.26

The Buddha teaches that it is only by thoroughly understanding, being detached from, and giving up body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness that attainment of the ending of pain is possible

PTS: Understanding, or Thorough Knowledge, III.26
WP: Directly Knowing, I.873
Discussion

[25] Chanda-Raaga Sutta.m, III.27

The Buddha teaches that it is by putting away wanting and lust associated with body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness that these things are abandoned in such a way as to prevent their arising again in the future.

PTS: Desire and Lust, III.26
WP: Desire and Lust, 873

[26] Pa.thama Assaada Sutta.m, III.27

The Buddha describes how he attained certainty as to his awakening by thoroughly understanding the enjoyment to be had from, the danger of and the way to terminate body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Satisfaction (1), III.27
WP: Gratification 1, I.873
Discussion

[27] Dutiya Assaada Sutta.m, III.29

The Buddha describes how he attained certainty as to his awakening by thoroughly understanding the enjoyment to be had from, the poverty of and the way to terminate body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Satisfaction 2, III.28
WP: Gratification 2, I.874

[28] Tatiya Assaada Sutta.m, III.29

The Buddha describes how it is that beings may gain awakening by thoroughly understanding the enjoyment to be had from, the poverty of and the way to terminate body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.
Note the description of Nibbana here as 'dwelling with a heart (center/mind) out of the flow, unyoked, let loose, made without boundry-lines.' nissa.taa visa~n~nuttaa vippamuttaa vimariyaadi-katena cetasaa viharantii.

PTS: Satisfaction 3, III.29
WP: Gratification 3, I.875

[29] Abhinandana.m Sutta.m, III.31

The Buddha declares that he who takes delight in the form, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness is not free from pain, but he who is free from such delight is free from pain.
How does this work? Delight is one step removed from sensation. Delight is not the arising of pleasant sensation, it is the indulging in the enjoyment of that sensation, and is therefore fuel for the furtherence of existence. The act of indulging in delight has as it's counterpart existence. By not indulging in delight upon the arising of pleasant sensation, there is no fuel with counterpart in existence. (see the next sutta)
See also for this, SN 2.14.35.

PTS: Taking Delight In, III.30
BD: In Pain
WP: Delight, I.875

[30] Uppaada Sutta.m, III.31

The Buddha explains that that which is the platform for body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness is the platform for pain and that when the platform is eliminated the pain is eliminated.

PTS: Uprising, III.30
WP: Arising, I.876

[31] Aghamuula Suttam.m, III.32

The Buddha describes shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as the abyss and thirst for pleasure and existence as the root of the Abyss.

PTS: The Root of Pain, III.31
BD: The Root of the Abyss, Olds, trans.
WP: The Root of Misery, I.876

[32] Pabha'ngu Sutta.m, III.32

The Buddha describes shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as fragile and the having brought these things to an end as the unfragile.

PTS: The Corruptible, III.31
WP: The Fragile, 876

I.IV. Natumhaaka Vagga, III.33

[33] Pa.thama Natumhaaka Sutta.m, III.33

The Buddha describes shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as not belonging to one and something that should be put away.

PTS: Not Yours, III.31
WP: Not Yours 1, I. 877

[34] Dutiya Natumhaaka Sutta.m, III.34

The Buddha describes shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as not belonging to one and something that should be put away. Identical with the previous but omitting the simile.

PTS: Not yours 2, III.32
WP: Not Yours 2, I.877

[35] Bhikkhu Sutta.m, III.34

A bhikkhu is given a teaching in brief that it is through a bias towards body, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness that a personality is got, without such bias, there is no attaining such a personality.

PTS: The Mendicant, III.32
WP: A Certain Bhikkhu, 877
Buddhism in Translations, SN KV 22.35. Warren, trans.

[36] Dutiya Bhikkhu Sutta.m, III.36

A bhikkhu is given a teaching in brief that it is through an inclination towards body, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness that one is measured and known.
The lesson is the same as the previous sutta but the wording explains the mechanism in slightly more detail. Here the bias towards body becomes that by which one measures the values of things and it is because of such measuring that one assumes a personality of a certain sort.

PTS: The Mendicant 2, III.34
WP: A Certain Bhikkhu 2, I.879
ATI: The Monk (On Identifying with the Aggregates)

[37] Pa.thama Aananda Sutta.m, III.37

The Buddha quizzes Ananda on his understanding of the characteristics of arising, ending, standing still and changing of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Aananda, III.34
WP: Aananda, I.880

[38] Dutiya Aananda Sutta.m, III.38

The Buddha quizzes Ananda on his understanding of the characteristics of arising, ending, standing still and changing of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness in the past, future and present.

PTS: Aananda, 2, III.35
WP: Aananda, 2, I.880

[39] Pa.thama Anudhamma Sutta.m, III.40

Following the teachings within the Dhamma one becomes disenchanted from, understanding of, and rid of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Conforming to the Norm (1), III.36
WP: 39-42: In Accordance with the Dhamma, I.882
ATI: In Accordance with the Dhamma (1), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Following Dhamma (1), Olds, trans.

[40] Dutiya Anudhamma Sutta.m, III.41

Following the teachings within the Dhamma one lives seeing instability in, understanding of, and rid of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Conforming to the Norm (2), III.36
WP: In Accordance with the Dhamma 2, I.882
ATI: In Accordance with the Dhamma (2), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Following Dhamma (2), Olds, trans.

[41] Tatiya Anudhamma Sutta.m, III.41

Following the teachings within the Dhamma one lives seeing pain in, understanding of, and rid of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Conforming to the Norm (3), III.36
WP: In Accordance with the Dhamma 3, I.882
ATI: In Accordance with the Dhamma (3), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Following Dhamma (3), Olds, trans.

[42] Catuttha Anudhamma Sutta.m, III.41

Following the teachings within the Dhamma one lives seeing not-self in, understanding of, and rid of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Conforming to the Norm (4), III.36
WP: In Accordance with the Dhamma 4, I.882
ATI: In Accordance with the Dhamma (4), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: Following Dhamma (3), Olds, trans.

I.V. Attadiipa Vagga, III.42

[43] Attadiipa Sutta.m, III.42

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to live independently of others and to rely only on themselves and the Teachings.

BD: Self-Illuminated
Live as a Light Unto Yourself Analysis of the Translations
PTS: An island to self, III.37
WP: With Yourselves as an Island, I.882
ATI: An Island to Oneself, Maurice O'Connell Walshe, trans.

[44] Pa.tipadaa Sutta.m, III.43

The Buddha explains that to view body, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness as the self is the way to living in a body and the resultant pain.

PTS: The Way to, III.38
WP: The Way, I.883

[45] Pa.thama Aniccataa Sutta.m, III.44

The Buddha explains that to view body, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness as impermanent, to view that which is impermanent as painful, and to view that which is painful as not the self or an aspect of the self, is seeing things as they are. So seeing, if one turns the heart away from these things and releases the heart by not fueling self through thirst for pleasure, thirst for existence and blindness, the heart becomes steady, happy, untroubled and well and in this freedom, seeing freedom, one knows that rebirth is ended, lived is the godly life, done is duty's doing and there is no more being any sort of an 'it' at any sort of an 'atness'.

PTS: Impermanence (1), III.39
WP: Impermanent 1, I.884

[46] Dutiya Aniccataa Sutta.m, III.45

The Buddha explains that whether it is in the past, the future or the present, to view body, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness as impermanent, to view that which is impermanent as painful, and to view that which is painful as not the self or an aspect of the self, is seeing things as they are. So seeing, if one turns the heart away from these things and releases the heart by not fueling self through thirst for pleasure, thirst for existence and blindness, the heart becomes steady, happy, untroubled and well and in this freedom, seeing freedom, one knows that rebirth is ended, lived is the godly life, done is duty's doing and there is no more being any sort of an 'it' at any sort of an 'atness'.
This sutta is a variation on the previous. The BJT Pali has it arranged such as to have the conclusion applied to each of the five initial statements. If this were the case it should be applied to the previous sutta as well. However if such an arragement were correct it would amount to saying that by correctly seeing any single one of the khandhas, one could attain arahantship. This is not to say that this is not a possibility, as there is some support for this notion in that it can be argued that for the thorough comprehension of one a thorough comprehension of them all is needed, thus it could be said that the goal was achieved through the one.
It might have been corrected in later versions, but my copy of the BJT Pali for this entire book contains a great number of errors of the copy and paste variety. It looks like it went through some sort of initial setup and then was forgotten.

PTS: Impermanence 2, III.39
WP: Impermanent 2, I.885

[47] Samanupassanaa Sutta.m, III.46

Whoever holds opinions concerning the self does so with the body, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness in mind. With one or another of these things giving rise to thoughts of 'I am' or 'it is', there arises experience through the six senses and with the experience, the conviction that these things exist. Seeing this as it is, it can be let go and those convictions disappear.

PTS: View, III.40
WP: Ways of Regarding Things, I.885
ATI: Assumptions
BD: Observations, Olds, trans.

[48] Khandhaa Sutta.m, III.47

The Buddha defines what he calls the stockpiles (khandha) and what he calls the fueled stockpiles (upaadaanakkhandha).
A very important distinction is made here between khandha and upaadaanakkhandha. It is not form, sense-experience, perception, the own-made, and consciousness themselves that are the fuel supporting existence and rebirth; it is the delight with, the obsession with the lust, anger and blindness associated with these things that is that fuel. The distinction is being made between that which is already done, or that which exists externally, and that which is being contemplated, the subject of obsession, lust, anger and blindness. Body as seen objectively and body as seen in conjunction with the idea 'my'. If one is going to use the translation 'grasping' or 'clinging' for 'upadana', then the translation of 'upadanakkhandha' would be 'grasped-after-form...' or 'clung-to-form.' Woodward here uses 'factor that has to do with grasping' which passes, elsewhere he has used 'grasping-heaps' which gives the wrong sense: the heap is not grasping! That's something out of a horror movie. Bhk. Bodhi has 'subject to clinging' and has used 'affected by clinging' both of which are misdirections: the idea is that it is clinging to, or grasping after or the fueling based on or connected with body, etc, that gives rise to existence; this is not pointing to a thing there that is a clinging-affected body or a body that has been subjected to clinging. ... or maybe it is. Body is something that has become by way of clinging. But then if this term is to stand for both the obsessing that arises based on body and the body that arises based on obsessing, the term to be found must reflect both sides of the picture.
The stockpiles are one of the ways in which the Buddha has broken into smaller units everything in existence. The distinction between the stockpiles and the fueled stockpiles is that the fueled stockpiles are, as the name indicates, stockpiles fueled by the corrupting influences of lust, existence and blindness. In other words they have become the objects of the intent to experience sense-pleasures, existence, or the product of some point of view. The distinction is very clearly drawn in this sutta, but is it correct to draw the conclusion that it is saying that the khandhas exist separately from individuality? Identifying with the khandhas, or one of them, or holding opinions about the self (as per the previous sutta) they are upadana-kkhandha; seen externally, objectively, they are just khandha. When the asavas have been destroyed in the living Arahant, the khandhas are seen to carry on for the remainder of the lifespan of the being who became arahant. Subsequent to the 'visible' death of the Arahant, the body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness dhatu break apart, separate off and he makes no further khandhas the object of intent to experience sensory existence and for him without such intent, because he has destroyed the asavas, do not arise again. So from two perspectives (the living arahant, and the separation from body, etc. of the living being from the khandhas at death) we can see that there is a distinction between khandhas that are fueled and those that are no longer fueled, but we cannot say that there is any sustained or autonomous existence of the khandhas separate from individuality.

PTS: The Factors, III.41
WP: Aggregates, I.886
ATI: Aggregates
BD: The Stockpiles, Olds, trans.

[49] Pa.thama So.na Sutta.m, III.48

The Buddha advises Sona that making judgments about the superiority or inferiority or equality of the self with regard to others is just not seeing things as they are and then he leads him through the reasoning involved in seeing shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and sense-consciousness as not self because they are inconstant and that which is inconstant is painful and that so seeing one is free, and seeing freedom in freedom one knows rebirth has been left behind, the godly life has been lived, duty's doing is done and there will be no more being any sort of an 'it' at any place of 'atness'.

PTS: So.na (1), III.42
WP: So.na 1, I.887

[50] Dutiya So.no Sutta.m, III.50

The Buddha teaches Sona that whatever shamen or brahmin there are who do not understand body, its arising, its ending and the way going to its ending are not recognized among shamen and brahmin as shamen or brahmin nor have they experienced the benefits of being a shaman or brahman.

PTS: So.na 2, III.44
WP: So.na 2, I.889

[51] Pa.thama Nandikkhaya Sutta.m, III.51

Seeing shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as inconstant is consummate view (samma-ditthi), so seeing distaste arises, with the arising of distaste the attraction diminishes, with the diminishing of the attraction lust diminishes, with the destruction of lust one is free.
Note that here 'samma ditthi' is not the usual Four Truths.

PTS: The Destruction of the Lure (1), III.44
WP: Destruction of Delight 1, I.889

[52] Dutiya Nandikkhaya Sutta.m, III.51

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to thoroughly exmine body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness, seeing these things as impermanent and regarding them with distaste and by that achieving freedom.

PTS: The Destruction of the Lure 2, III.45
WP: Destruction of Delight 2, I.890

II. Majjhima-pannasa

I. Upaaya Vagga, III.53

[53] Upaayo Sutta.m, III.53

In this sutta individualized consciousness is shown as being dependent on a person's attachment to and taking up of form, sensation, perception, and own-making, and that when attachment is let go consciousness is liberated.
This is a very important sutta! It is in this sutta we get the very important idea that there is no individualized consciousness apart from form, sensation, perception and own-making. That is that consciousness is conditioned. But here also we see that consciousness (when freed from attachment to the Four Sticking-Points) is equated with Nibbana.

PTS: Attachment, III.45
WP: Engagement, I.890
ATI: Attached
Buddhism in Translations: SN KV 22.53. Warren, trans.
BD: Taking Up, Olds translation
Discussion.

[54] Biija Sutta.m, III.54

The Buddha explains that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are, like the five means for the propagation of plants, the five means for the propagation of consciousness. Shapes, sense-experience, perception, and own-making are like the earth. Delight is like water. By eliminating delight in shapes, sense-experience, perception and own-making, consciousness is not propagated and when not propagated it is set free.

PTS: Seed, III.46
WP: Seeds, I.891
ATI: Means of Propagation

[55] Udaana Sutta.m, III.55

The Buddha explains how if shapes, sense-experiences, perceptions, own-making and consciousness were not identified with now, there would be no future existence of identified-with shapes, sense-experiences, perceptions, own-making and consciousness and the pain they bring with them.

PTS: Inspired Words, III.48
WP: Inspired Utterance, I.892
ATI: Exclamation
Discussion

[56] Upaadaana Parivatta Sutta.m, III.58

The Buddha describes the stockpiles (kandha) in detail and shows how they are to be analyzed according to the Four Truths.
Note here that sankhara (my 'own-making') is described in terms of intent (sancitana) making it very clear that this term is to be understood as a synonym for kamma. Here is the argument against relying on the commentary for understanding technical terms. There is no need for commentary. Every important term is defined by Gotama himself. What is needed is not consultation with the commentaries, it is thorough examination of the suttas. When you have mastered the suttas it is then sometimes interesting to cosult the commentaries for background stories. There I say is their real value.

PTS: Grasping (applied to) the Series, III.50
WP: Phases of the Clinging Aggregates, I.895
ATI: The (Fourfold) Round
Discussion

[57] Satta.t.thaana Sutta.m, III.61

The Buddha defines one who has mastered Dhamma: He is skilled in knowledge of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness; he knows what results in their arising, he knows what brings about their ending; he knows their satisfaction, their pain and the way to escape them; and he investigates things in three ways: by way of their elementary data, by way of their relationship to the senses, and by way of that on which they depend for their arising (the paticca samuppada).
Compare this with living in the Dhamma overseeing the Dhamma through the Dhamma of the Satipatthana Sutta.

PTS: The Seven Points, III.54
WP: The Seven Cases, I.897
ATI: Seven Bases

[58] Sambuddha Sutta.m, III.65

The Buddha Explains the difference between a Buddha and an Arahant.
The Pali title of this sutta is 'Sambuddho'; the full description of a Buddha is 'Sammaa-sambuddha'. An Arahant could be said to be Consummately (or Perfectly or fully) Awakened (sammaa-buddho). The 'sam' is important. Here this sutta is showing the difference between the consummately awakened Arahant and a Buddha. What is that difference? It is that a Buddha is 'Self-Awakened'. Awakened without the assistance of another.

PTS: Fully Enlightened, III.57
WP: The Perfectly Enlightened One, I.900
ATI: Awakened, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[59] Pa~nca Sutta.m, III.66

The second discourse given by Gotama, the Buddha, to his first five disciples, on the subject of not-self. This discourse resulted in the five attaining arahantship.
See First Sutta Resources for the full story.
This is the basic reasoning behind the idea of not-self and follows logically from the doctrines laid out in the first sutta on the idea that the seeker should not go down either the path of self-indulgence or the path of self denial; seeing that that which has become is subject to ending; seeing that ending is a word for Pain; seeing that the source of this pain is thirst; that the way to end the pain is to end the thirst; and the way to end the thirst is to understand, to conform one's behavior, and to make real the peramaters outlined by the Aristocratic Multi-dimensional Way.
The Mendis translation also has a description of the events surrounding this sutta and an exposition of his understanding of the whole doctrine, but has two flaws: he speaks of 'No Self' in his discussion (which is an extreme view and an incorrect understanding of 'anatta') but has it correctly as 'not-self' in his translation; and he says that the disciples had insight into 'the impermanence of anything which had a conditioned origin' - another case of the misunderstanding that arises from the mis-translation of sa'nkhaaraa (own-making see: Is Nibbana Conditioned, discussion). Not everything that is conditioned is unstable; everything that is own-made is unstable.

PTS: The Five, III.59
WP: The Characteistic of Nonself, I.901
ATI: The Discourse on the Not-self Characteristic (Thanissaro Bhikkhu, trans.)
The Not-self Characteristic (Nanamoli Thera, trans)
The On the No-self Characteristic, N.K.G. Mendis, trans. with introduction
BD: The Group of Five, Olds translation.

[60] Mahaali Sutta.m, III.68

The Buddha explains to Mahali that beings become corrupt or pure as a result of reactions to the painful and pleasant features of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Mahaali, III.60
WP: Mahaali, I.903
ATI: To Mahali

[61] Aaditta Sutta.m, III.71

A fire and brimstone sermon teaching that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are as if on fire.
This is a variation, using the stockpiles (khandhas) of the following which use 'The All'. VP.MV.I.21, SN 4.35.28 and SN 3.22.61. But I think for the full effect the best rendering is the compilation used for The Sixth Lesson. ... which should tell you that the stockpiles (khandha) = the all (salayatana); Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness is another way of saying: the eye and sight, the ear and sound, the nose and scents, the tongue and tastes, the body and touches, and the mind and things.

PTS: On Fire, III.62
WP: Burning, I.904

[62] Niruttipatha Sutta.m, III.71

The Buddha affirms that the most fundamental way of describing things (shapes, sense-experiences, perceptions, the own-make, and consciousness) is relative to their position in Time.
One of the more obscure and unusual suttas it is nevertheless a valuable piece of information for meditators who reach levels of perception outside of time (akalika); one of the attributes of the Arahant.

PTS: Mode of Reckoning, III.62
BD: Getting Down to the Fundamentals, Olds, trans.
WP: Pathways of Language, I.905
Discussion.

II.II. Arahatta Vagga, III.73

[63] Upaadiyamaano Sutta.m, III.73

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is supporting fuel belongs to Mara, by letting go of that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.

PTS: Clinging, III.64
WP: In Clinging, I.906

[64] Ma~n~namaano Sutta.m, III.74

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is imagined that belongs to Mara, by letting go of that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
The Pali word to understand here is PED: "Ma~n~nati [man, Vedic manyate and manute, Av. mainyeite; Idg. *men, cp. Gr. me/nos mood, anger = Sanskrit manah mind; me/mona to think of, wish to, Latin memini to think of, mens > mind, meneo; Goth. munan to think, muns opinion; Oisl. man, Ags. mon; Ohg. minna love, Ags, myne intention.] 1. to think, to be of opinion, to imagine, to deem".

PTS: Imagining, III.65
WP: In Conceiving, I.907

[65] Abhinandana Sutta.m, III.75

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever one is enamoured of that belongs to Mara, by letting go of that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.

PTS: Enamoured, III.65
WP: In Seeking Delight, 907

[66] Anicca Sutta.m, III.76

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is unstable, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.

PTS: Impermanent, III.65
WP: Impermanent, I.908

[67] Dukkha Sutta.m, III.77

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is painful, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.

PTS: Suffering, III.66
WP: Suffering, I.909

[68] Anattaa Sutta.m, III.77

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever is not self, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.
Caution: Here Woodward's translation of Anatta as 'no self' is correct Dhamma because of the construction of the sutta. It says what is anattaa, desire for that should be let go. This is not an opinion or point of view concerning the ultimate existence of a self. It is speaking of the nature of body, etc. To say 'body is no self' is not to say 'there is no self.' Still it would have been better to have translated this as 'not self'.

PTS: No Self, III.66
WP: Nonself, I.909

[69] Anattaniya Sutta.m, III.78

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever does not belong to the self, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.

PTS: Not Belonging to the Self, III.66
WP: What Does Not Belong to Self, I.909

[70] Rajaniiyasa.n.thita Sutta.m, III.79

The Buddha gives a meditation subject to a bhikkhu: Whatsoever inherent in what is lustful, that belongs to Mara, by letting go of desire for that one is free of the Evil One. And that bhikkhu becomes an arahant.

PTS: Lustful, III.66
WP: Whatever Appears Tantalizing, I.909

[71] Raadha Sutta.m, III.79

The Buddha teaches Radha how to be sure that all notions of 'I' and 'mine' have been eradicated.
That is that one can see that whatever shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness there may be, past, future or present, exalted or lowly, pleasant or unpleasant it is all regarded as not the self or belonging to the self.

PTS: Radha, III.66
WP: Raadha, I.909

[72] Suraadha Sutta.m, III.80

The Buddha teaches Suradha how to be sure that all notions of 'I' and 'mine' have been eradicated.

PTS: Suradha, III.67
WP: Suraadha, I.910

II.III. Khajjaniya Vagga, III.81

[73] Assaado Sutta.m, III.81

The Buddha explains that the difference between the disciple and the ordinary commoner (puthujjano) is in the understanding of the satisfaction, misery, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.
It is an unfortunate habit of some bhikkhus today to refer to all those who are not actual members of the worldly sangha as 'puthujjano'. Here we see the real meaning. This should be understood also in the parallel case of the sangha when defined as the four pairs of men. "It is not by the color of his cloths, beggars, that one who is close to me is to be known."

PTS: Satisfaction, III.68
WP: Gratification, I.910

[74] Pa.thama Samudayo Sutta.m, III.82

The Buddha explains that the difference between the disciple and the ordinary commoner (puthujjano) is in the understanding of the arising, going out, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Arising (1), III.68
WP: Origin 1, I.911

[75] Dutiya Samudayo Sutta.m, III.82

The Buddha explains that the disciple understands the satisfaction, misery, arising, ending, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Arising (2), III.68
WP: Origin 2, I.911

[76] Pa.thama Arahanta Sutta.m, III.82

The Buddha teaches that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are inconstant, that what is inconstant is painful, that what is painful is not the self and that such things should be regarded as 'not mine', not the self.
NOTE: This sutta concludes with a statement that among beings up to the highest of those who have become, Arahanship is the culmination and mastery. This is translated in a misleading way such as to indicate that Arahantship is to be included as one of the 'becomings.' Woodward has also mistranslated 'sattavasa' as 'the seven abodes.' This is 'being's vestments', or 'abodes of beings', and there are nine of such.

PTS: Arahants (1), III.68
WP: Arahants 1, I.911

[77] Dutiya Arahanta Sutta.m, III.84

The Buddha teaches that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness are inconstant, that what is inconstant is painful, that what is painful is not the self and that such things should be regarded as 'not mine', not the self.

PTS: Arahants 2, III.70
WP: Arahants 2, I.913

[78] Siihopama Sutta.m, III.84

The Buddha compairs the effect of the teaching of the Dhamma on gods and men to the effect of the lion's roar on the creatures of the forest.

PTS: The Lion, III.70
WP: The Lion, I.913

[79] Khajjaniiya Sutta.m, III.86

Beginning with a discussion of what it is that one speaks of when one speaks of recollecting past lives, the Buddha then gives some detailed explanation of what is to be understood by shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness. Then speaking of these things as inconstant, painful and not self he describes the arahant as becoming disgsted at them and by that becoming free and by perceiving freedom in that freedom, reaching arahantship. Then further he describes such a one as one who neither heaps up or reduces, neither lets go nor takes up, neither scatters nor gathers.

PTS: The Prey, III.72
WP: Being Devoured, I.914
ATI: Chewed Up
BD: Consumed, Olds, trans.

[80] Pindolya Sutta.m, III.91

The Buddha explains that the bhikkhus have entered 'the lowest profession', that of scrap (or 'chunk', or 'glob' or 'mess') hunters, not from want of a livlihood or fears, but because it is in this way that some way out of all the pain in the world may be found.
The Buddha explains that the bhikkhus have entered 'the lowest profession', that of scrap (or 'chunk', or 'glob' or 'mess') (see SN 3.22.96 where it is used for a tiny 'bit' or 'lump' of dung) hunters, not from want of a livlihood or fears, but because it is in this way that some way out of all the pain in the world may be found.||
Although the term here is not 'bhikkhu' (beggar), but 'pindola' scrap hunter, or 'dole-man', someone on the dole, the spirit is the same. Many of the 'monks' of today object strenuously to being called 'beggars' and have completely missed the point: It is by adopting the lowest of callings that pride of birth is humbled and by showing those who are beggars as a consequence of their bad kamma, that such a life can be lived with ease, generosity, virtue and dignity it teaches the way out of their misery. The translation of 'bhikkhu' as 'monk' and of 'pindola' as 'almsman' or 'mendacant' whitewashes the truth and destroys the lesson.
This sutta is also interesting in that it records a feat of magic power in which the bhikkhus are lead to believe they are appearing before the Buddha singly or in pairs though they are all addressed simultaneously.

PTS: Almsman, III.77
WP: Alms-Gatherer, I.918
ATI: Almsgoers, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[81] Paarileyyaka Sutta.m, III.94

Describing a method for quickly eliminating the corrupting influences of lust, existing and blindness, the Buddha shows how holding any sort of opinion or view that the self is, or has, or has within or is within shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness, or even having doubt about such is own-making, and that which is own-made, is inconstant, and that which is inconstant is painful and that by getting rid of such opinions and doubts, one quickly gets rid of the corrupting influences.
This sutta focuses down on the idea of sankhara in such a way as to make it absolutely clear that the meaning of this term is own-making, personalizing the objective, fabricating the individuality, con-structing the individuality, own-making.

PTS: Paarileyya, III.80
WP: Paarileyya, I.921
ATI: At Palileyyaka

[82] Pu.n.namaa Sutta.m, III.100

The Buddha delivers a comprehensive discourse on the fuel stockpiles, the 'panc-upadana-kkhandha'.
Here is a really good example of how the Dhamma was propagated among the bhikkhus. Togethere with his five hundred pupils, face-to-face with the Buddha, a group teacher asks a series of questions which when answered by the Buddha elucidate the entire spectrum of doctrines concerning the 'pa~nc-upaadaana-kkhandhaa,' the five fuel-stockpiles. Completely blurred over by abridgment.

PTS: Full Moon, III.84
WP: The Full-Moon Night, 923

II.IV. Thera Vagga, III.105

[83] Aananda Sutta.m, III.105

Ananda relates to the bhikkhus how Punna taught him about the stockpiles (khandha) and how that was the teaching that resulted in him becoming a streamwinner.
Here Woodward translates 'upaadaa' as 'cause'. This makes four terms the reader must remember to determine what, exactly is the Pali term being translated. Others are 'nidana' (tied to), 'paccaya' (result), and 'hetu' (driving force, engine). Even the usual 'grasping' would be better. Better would be 'support' or 'fueled by'. Bhk. Thanissaro here translates the term 'possessiveness.' Bhk. Bodhi has 'clinging'.

PTS: Aananda, III.89
WP: Aananda, I.928
ATI: Ananda, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[84] Tisso Sutta.m, III.106

The Buddha instructs and uplifts the venerable Tissa who has become discouraged.
A very instructive parable on the experiences to be expected by one who is walking the path concludes this sutta.

BD: Tissa
PTS: Tissa, III.90
WP: Tissa, I.929
ATI: Tissa, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[85] Yamaka Sutta.m, III.109

Sariputta disuades Yamaka from the view that after death the individual is annihilated.

BD: Yamako
"Not Self" not "No Self" Outline/Translation, discussion
PTS: Yamaka, III.93
WP: Yamaka, I.931
ATI: To Yamaka
Buddhism in Translations: There is No Ego, SN 3 22 85

[86] Anuraadha Sutta.m, III.116

The Buddha instructs Anuradha as to how to respond to those of other views who ask about the existence or non-existence of the Tathagata after death (one who has won Arahantship).

PTS: Anuraadha, III.99
WP: Anuraadha, I.936
ATI: To Anuradha

[87] Vakkali Sutta.m, III.119

The Buddha visits the Ven. Vakkali, who is sick.

PTS: Vakkali, III.101
WP: Vakkali, Bhk. Bodhi, trans., I.938
BPS: Vakkali, Walshe, trans.

[88] Assaji Sutta.m, III.124

Venerable Assaji is suffering an illness which prevents him from attaining jhana and he is worried about falling away. The Buddha explains to him that the essence of his teaching is not the attaining of jhana, and he instructs him in such a way as to bring about Assaji's arahantship.
There is some problem here with the identification of this Assaji with the Assaji who renounced the world with Gotama and who was the first teacher of Saariputta. That Assaji would almost certainly have been called here 'Assaji Thera', where this Assaji is called 'aayasmaa Assaji, 'Elder'. Either this is the mistake or there is a far more serious error in that 'Assaji Thera' was supposed to have attained arahantship during the second discourse (Pa~nca Suttam) and this Assaji still has doubts and must be instructed concerning inconstance, pain and not self.

PTS: Assaji, III.106
WP: Assaji, I.941

[89] Khema Sutta.m, III.126

A dialogue between Venerable Khema and a group of elder bhikkhus concerning identification with the five fuel stockpiles (khandhas).
This is a very instructive sutta told with a wonderful sense of humor. The very important thing to note here is Khema's explanation of how it can be that though one has thoroughly broken the idea of identification of self with the khandhas, there can remain a subtle inclination towards this identification.
"Friends, even though a noble disciple has abandoned the five lower fetters, still, in relation to the five aggregates subject to clinging, there lingers in him a residual conceit 'I am,' a desire 'I am,' an underlying tendency 'I am' that has not yet been uprooted."
There is a difference between being convinced that there is no thing there that is the self and actually seeing what is there as not-self.
Another angle to consider when pondering the meaning of 'anusaya'.

PTS: Khema, III.107
WP: Khemaka, 942
ATI: About Khemaka

[90] Channa Sutta.m, III.132

After Channa has mastered understanding of the inconstance and lack of self in the khandhas, he receives further instruction in the Paticca Samuppada from Ananda.

PTS: Channa, III.111
WP: Channa, I.946
ATI: To Channa

[91] Pa.thama Raahula Sutta.m, III.135

Rahula, Gotama's son, receives instruction on how to view all things as not-self.

PTS: Raahula (1), III.114
WP: Raahula 1, I.947

[92] Dutiya Raahula Sutta.m, III.136

Rahula, Gotama's son, receives instruction on how to view all things as not-self.

PTS: Raahula (2), III.115
WP: Raahula 2, I.948

II.V. Puppha Vagga, III.137

[93] Nadii Sutta.m, III.137

The Buddha likens the way beings grasp at body, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness to the way a man being swept away by a swiftly flowing stream grasps at the reeds and bushes on the bank only to have them break away, giving him no means to escape destrucion.

PTS: The River, III.116
WP: The River, I.949
ATI: The River
BD: The Stream, Olds, trans.
The Stream, illustrated

[94] Puppha Sutta.m, (or Vaddham), III.138

The Buddha takes the position that it is not he that argues with the world, but it is the world that argues with him, that he agrees with those who are worldly-wise who say 'there is not,' that is that there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making or consciousness which is constant, that he agrees with those who say 'it is' that is that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are simply pain. This he says he teaches and he dismisses those who hearing him so teach do not comprehend.

PTS: The Flower (or Growth), III.117
BD: Flowers, Olds, trans.
WP: Flowers, 949

[95] Phe.na-Pi.n.d'uupama Sutta.m, III.140

The Buddha gives similes for each of the khandhas: shape: foam; sense-experience: a bubble on the water; perception: a mirage; own-making: searching for heartwood in the wrong tree; consciousness: a magician's illusion.

PTS: Foam, III.118
WP: A Lump of Foam, I.951
ATI: Foam

[96] Gomaya Pi.n.dupama Sutta.m, III.143

A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not, and then he is shown by way of example, a past life of Gotama where he was a king of extraordinary wealth and splendor and yet all that wealth and splendor has disappeared.

PTS: Cowdung, III.122
WP: A Lump of Cowdung, I.953

[97] Nakhaasika Sutta.m, III.147

A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not, and then the Buddha explains that if there were one of the stockpiles (khandhas) even as small as a bit of dust that were stable and everlasting there would be no need to teach the Dhamma.

PTS: Tip of the Nail, III.125
WP: The Fingernail, I.955
ATI: The Tip of the Fingernail

[98] Suddhika (or Samuddaka) Sutta.m, III.149

A bhikkhu asks if there is any shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, or consciousness which is stable and everlasting. He is told that there is not.

PTS: Puritan (or Oceanic), III.126
WP: Simple Version, I.956
BD: The Pure or Oceanic Version, Olds, trans.

[99] Pa.thama Gaddula (or Bhaddula) Sutta.m, III.149

The Buddha likens the way the commoner runs around after shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness to the way a dog tied to a post runs round and round the post and never gets free of the post.

PTS: The Leash (or The Thong) (1), III.126
WP: The Leash 1, I.957
ATI: The Leash

[100] Dutiya Gaddula Sutta.m, III.151

The Buddha likens the way the commoner runs around after shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness to the way a dog tied to a post runs round and round the post and never gets free of the post. Then he likens the creativity of mind in devising the taints that corrupt individuals to that of the hypnotist creating an illusion, to nature in devising the various forms of animals, or to an artest creating an image of a man or a woman.

PTS: The Leash 2, III.127
WP: The Leash 2, I.958
ATI: The Leash (2)

[101] Vaasija.topama (or Naavaa) Sutta.m, III.152

The Buddha provides several similes which illustrate the fact that it is not by wishing, but by mastering the understanding and behaviors found in the Dhamma that freedom from rebirth is attained.

PTS: Adze-handle (or The Ship), III.129
WP: The Adz Handle (or The Ship), I.959
ATI: The Ship

[102] Aniccasa~n~naa Sutta.m aka Aniccataa or Sa~n~naa, III.155

The Buddha enumerates a string of similes illustrating the benefits of perception of instability (anicca).

PTS: Impermanence (or Perception), III.132
WP: Perception of Impermanence, I.961

III. Uparipannasaka, I. Anta Vagga, III.157

[103] Antaa Sutta.m, III.157

The Buddha describes four goals in detail.

PTS: The Separates, III.134
WP: Portions, I. 963

[104] Dukkha Sutta.m, III.158

The Buddha teaches about pain, the arising of pain, the ending of pain and the way to the ending of pain.

PTS: Suffering, III.135
WP: Suffering, I.963

[105] Sakkaaya Sutta.m, III.159

The Buddha defines individuality, the arising of individuality, the ending of individuality and the walk to walk to the ending of individuality.

PTS: The Person-pack, III.135
WP: Identity, I.964

[106] Pari~n~neyya Sutta.m, III.159

The Buddha states the Dhamma briefly in terms of understanding.

PTS: Things to be Understood, III.136
WP: To Be Fully Understood, I.964

[107] Pa.thama Sama.na Sutta.m, III.160

The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Recluses (1), III.136
WP: Ascetics, I.964

[108] Dutiya Sama.na Sutta.m, III.160

The Buddha defines what it means to be a shaman or a Brahmin in terms of understanding shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Recluses 2, III.136
WP: Ascetics 2, I.965

[109] Sotaapanna Sutta.m, III.160

The Buddha defines streamwinning in terms of understanding the arising, ending, satisfaction, misery, and escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Stream-winner, III.137
WP: Stream-Enterer, I.965

[110] Arahanta Sutta.m, III.161

The Buddha defines the arahant in terms of understanding the arising, ending, satisfaction, misery, and escape from, and the experience of liberation without further fuel from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: The Arahant, III.137
WP: Arahant, I.966

[111] Pa.thama Chandaraaga Sutta.m, III.161

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to abandon all desire and lust for shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.

PTS: Desirous-Lustful (1), III.137
WP: Abandoning Desire, I.966

[112] Dutiya Chandaraaga Sutta.m, III.161

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to abandon all desire and lust (including the holding of theories, beliefs and prejudices) for shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.

PTS: Desirous-lustful (2), III.138
WP: Abandoning Desire 2, I.966

III.II. Dhammakathika-Vagga, III.162

[113] Avijjaa (or Bhikkhu) Sutta.m, III.162

The Buddha describes blindness in terms of not knowing about shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making or sense-consciousness, not knowing about their arising, not knowing about their ending, and not knowing about the walk to walk to bring about their ending.

PTS: Ignorance (or The Brother), III.138
WP: Ignorance, I.966

[114] Vijjaa (or Bhikkhu) Sutta.m, III.163

The Buddha describes having vision in terms of knowing about shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making or sense-consciousness, knowing about their arising, knowing about their ending, and knowing about the walk to walk to bring about their ending.
Woodward translates 'avijjaa' and 'vijjaa' as 'ignorance' and 'wisdom'; Bhk. Bodhi translates them 'ignorance' and 'true knowledge'. 'Ignorance' has pretty much established itself in the general consciousness but it is not quite accurate. The word means 'not-vision' and it's opposite should be the opposite of whatever word is used for that (or the other way around). Wisdom is having vision plus having knowledge of the ways that vision is best used in a broad scope of applications. The better translation is closer to Bhk. Bodhi's but there is no 'true' there. It is really 'vision', 'seeing'. Additionally 'wisdom' has been and is better used for 'pa~n~naa' (pan knowing).

PTS: Wisdom (or The Brother), III.139
WP: True Knowledge, I.967

[115] Pa.thama Kathika Sutta.m, III.163

The Buddha defines the Dhamma Teacher, the one who lives the Dhamma following the Dhamma, and the one who has won Nibbaana in terms of teaching about, following, and being released from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.

PTS: The Teacher, III.139
WP: A Speaker on the Dhamma, I.967

[116] Dutiya Kathika Sutta.m, III.164

The Buddha defines the Dhamma Teacher, the one who lives the Dhamma following the Dhamma, and the one who has won Nibbana in terms of teaching about, following, and being released from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.
There appears to me to be some confusion between this and the previous sutta. In the first the only question asked is what makes a Dhamma teacher but three questions are answered. In the second three questions are asked which correspond to the answers given in both suttas. Further complicating the issue Woodward makes the second question in the second sutta ask about teaching about living the Dhamma following the Dhamma, which is not being asked and does not correspond to the answer. It seems the first sutta should have asked only the first question and been given only the first answer, and the second sutta which asks all three questions should follow (without Woodward's interjection of 'is one a teacher of').

PTS: The Preacher, III.140
WP: A Speaker on the Dhamma 2, 968

[117] Bandhanaa Sutta.m, III.164

The Buddha distinguishes between the well tamed, well educated, well trained and the commoner by whether or not they regard shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness as the self.

PTS: Bonds, III.140
WP: Bondage, I.968

[118] Pa.thama Paripucchika Sutta.m, III.165

The Buddha praises the bhikkhus for understanding that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are not to be regarded as the self.

PTS: Infatuated (1), III.141
WP: Interrogation, I.969

[119] Dutiya Paripucchika Sutta.m, III.166

The Buddha praises the bhikkhus for seeing that shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are not the self. A subtly different version of the previous.

PTS: Infatuated (2), III.141
WP: Interrogation 2, I.969

[120] Sa~n~nojaniya Sutta.m, III.166

The Buddha teaches that the things that give rise to what yokes one to rebirth are shapes, sense-experiences, perceptions, own-making, and consciousness, whereas the yokes themselves are the wants and desires connected to these things.
The point is to not think that it is the world that needs to change, but to focus on what it is within one's self that needs to change. It is by teaching the opposite of this lession that the activist Buddhists lead people astray.

PTS: The Fetter, III.142
WP: Things That Fetter, I.970

[121] Upaadaaniya Sutta.m, III.167

The Buddha teaches that the things that give rise to what fuels rebirth are shapes, sense-experiences, perceptions, own-making, and consciousness, whereas the fuel itself is the wanting and desires connected to these things.
Again the lesson is to look within, not without, for the solution to the problem of the pain associated with existence.

PTS: Grasping, III.142
WP: Things That Can Be Clung To, I.970
ATI: Clinging

[122] Siila Sutta.m, III.167

In a dialogue between Sariputta and Maha Kotthita Sariputta explains how by tracing out in mind the inconstance of, pain in, diseased nature of, cancerous nature of, knotty nature of, the thorny nature of, the horror of, the oppressive nature of, the otherness of, the corruptability of, the emptiness of, the non-self of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness the ethical person can become a Streamwinner, the Streamwinner can become a Once-Returner, the Once-Returner can become a Non-Returner, the Non-Returner can become an Arahant and the Arahant can live pleasantly in this visible world.

PTS: Virtue, III.143
WP: Virtuous, I.970
ATI: Virtuous

[123] Sutavataa Sutta.m, III.169

In a dialogue between Sariputta and Maha Kotthita Sariputta explains how by tracing out in mind the inconstance of, pain in, diseased nature of, cancerous nature of, knotty nature of, the thorny nature of, the horror of, the oppressive nature of, the otherness of, the corruptability of, the emptiness of, the non-self of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making, and consciousness the well-taught disciple can become a Streamwinner, the Streamwinner can become a Once-Returner, the Once-Returner can become a Non-Returner, the Non-Returner can become an Arahant and the Arahant can live pleasantly in this visible world.
Identical to the previous substituting 'well-taught' for 'ethical'.
The BJT Pali for both these suttas is mixed up and does not parallel either the PTS or CSCD.

PTS: The Well-Taught, III.144
WP: Instructed, I.972

[124] Pa.thama Kappa Sutta.m, III.169

The Buddha teaches Kappa how to be sure that all notions of 'I' and 'mine' have been eradicated.

PTS: Kappa, III.145
WP: Kappa, I.972

[125] Dutiya Kappa Sutta.m, III.170

The Buddha teaches Kappa how to be sure that all notions of 'I' and 'mine' have been eradicated.

PTS: Kappa 2, III.145
WP: Kappa 2, I.972

III.III. Avijjaa Vagga, III.170

[126] Pa.thama Samudaya-Dhamma Sutta.m, III.170

Upon being asked the Buddha teaches a bhikkhu the definition of 'blindness' and 'vision' in terms of understanding the nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as things that come to be, cease to be and both come to be and cease to be.
Woodward translates 'ignorance' and 'wisdom'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'ignorance' and 'true kowledge'.

PTS: Of A Coming-to-Pass-Nature (1), III.146
WP: Subject to Arising, I.972

[127] Dutiya Samudaya-Dhamma Sutta.m, III.172

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venenerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' in terms of understanding the nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as things that come to be, cease to be and both come to be and cease to be.
A variation on the first half of the previous sutta. One of many examples where two Arahants teach each other basic Dhamma. This is apparently either to bring the teaching into the record or to teach other novice bhikkhus that are in attendence. Sometimes it may be just simply delight in constructing some 'take' on the Dhamma.

PTS: Of a Coming-to-Pass-Nature 2, III.147
WP: Subject to Arising 2, I.973

[128] Tatiya Samudaya-Dhamma Sutta.m, III.173

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venenerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'vision' in terms of understanding the nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as things that come to be, cease to be and both come to be and cease to be.

PTS: Of a Coming-to-Pass-Nature 3, III.147
WP: Subject to Arising 3, I.973

[129] Pa.thama Assaada Sutta.m, III.173

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' in terms of not understanding the sweetness of, the wretchedness of and the escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.
Woodward: 'satisfaction', 'misery' and 'escape'; Bhk. Bodhi: 'gratification', 'danger', 'escape'.
Is it 'satisfaction'? Satisfaction means having had enough. That is the way to the end. The idea here is that one must know the pleasure to be found in things to understand why one is addicted to them.

PTS: Satisfaction (1), III.147
WP: Gratification, I.974

[130] Dutiya Assaada Sutta.m, III.173

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'vision' in terms of understanding the sweetness of, the wretchedness of and the escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Satisfaction 2, III.148
WP: Gratification 2, I.974

[131] Pa.thama Samudaya Sutta.m, III.174

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' in terms of not understanding the nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as things that come to be, cease to be and both come to be and cease to be.

PTS: Coming-to-Pass (1), III.148
WP: Origin, I.974

[132] Dutiya Samudaya Sutta.m, III.174

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' in terms of understanding the nature of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as things that come to be, cease to be and both come to be and cease to be.

PTS: Coming-to-Pass (2), III.148
WP: Origin 2, I.975

[133] Pa.thama Ko.t.thita Sutta.m, III.175

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' and 'vision' in terms of understanding the sweetness of, the wretchedness of and the escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Ko.t.thita (1), III.148
WP: Kotthita, I.975

[134] Dutiya Ko.t.thita Sutta.m, III.175

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' and 'vision' in terms of understanding the coming-to-pass of, the passing-away of, the sweetness of, the wretchedness of and the escape from shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness.

PTS: Ko.t.thita (2), III.148
WP: Kotthita 2, I.975

[135] Tatiya Ko.t.thita Sutta.m, III.176

Upon being asked, the venerable Sariputta teaches the venerable Maha Kotthita the definition of 'blindness' and 'vision' in terms of understanding shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness, understanding their arising, understanding their passing-away, and understanding the walk to walk to bring about their end.

PTS: Ko.t.thita (3), III.148
WP: Kotthita 3, I.975

III.IV. Kukkula-Vagga, III.177

[136] Kukkula Sutta.m, III.177

The Buddha describes shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness as glowing embers.
The controversy mentioned in this sutta is a tempest in a teapot which eminates from one side ridgidly holding the position that everything is painful, not acknowledging transitory pleasures as being nevertheless pleasures; while the other side refuses to see that seen from the point of view of the ultimate result this is a legitimate position. Pleasure in this world is an observable fact, it is also observable that it always ends in pain. Mrs. Rhys Davids translation of 'sankhaaraa' as 'conditioned' rather than 'own-made' or, at least 'constructed' in Pts. of Contr. only serves to confuse the issue.
What is going on here is important to note. It is essentially the same problem as trying to understand the notion of 'not-self' versus 'no self'. The difference between the statement (or interpretation of a statement made by another) of an observable fact and the statement of an opinion. Either of the two statements, 'the all (the world, the khandhas, etc.) is painful' or 'there is pleasure in the all ...' are true as far as they go. It is when the idea jumps to the categorical "everything, all (not 'the all') is ..." that the statement has become opinion. And, since an opinion concerning 'all' would require of the opinion holder the knowledge of all things at all times which is not possible, such opinion crosses over into error.

PTS: Glowing Embers, III.149
WP: Hot Embers, I.976

[137] Pa.thama Anicca Sutta.m, III.177

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are inconstant and desire for that which is inconstant should be put away by ending desire for these objects of desire.
Note that what is said is: "There (tatra vo 'in this!') put away desire." The meaning is that desire, arising from objects, needs to be ended by ending the desire for those objects. It is not ended by focusing one's effort on the attempt to end generic desire.

PTS: By the Impermanent (1), III.149
WP: Impermanent, I.976

[138] Dutiya Anicca Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are inconstant and lust for that which is inconstant should be put away by ending lust for these objects of lust.

PTS: By the Impermanent (2), III.149
WP: Impermanent 2, I.976

[139] Tatiya Anicca Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are inconstant and lustful desire for that which is inconstant should be put away by ending lust for these objects of lustful desire.
Chandaraago. Bhk. Bodhi and Woodward: desire and lust. Since it is possible in Pali to write such a thing as desire and lust were that the intended idea, it seems to me that we should not be translating compounds in this way, but should be seeking to create translations closer in feeling to the idea of a compound. A single idea, not two or three or a half dozen separate ideas.

BD:
PTS: By the Impermanent (3), III.149

[140] Pa.thama Dukkha Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are painful and desire for that which is painful should be put away by ending desire for these objects of desire.

PTS: By Suffering (1), III.149
WP: Suffering 1-3, I.977

[141] Dutiya Dukkha Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are painful and lust for that which is painful should be put away by ending lust for these objects of lust.

PTS: By Suffering (2), III.149

[142] Tatiya Dukkha Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are painful and lustful desire for that which is painful should be put away by ending lust for these objects of lustful desire.

BD:
PTS: By Suffering (3), III.149

[143] Pa.thama Anatta Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are not-self and desire for that which is not-self should be put away by ending desire for these objects of desire.

PTS: By Without A Self (1), III.149
WP: Nonself 1-3, I.977

[144] Dutiya Anatta Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are not-self and lust for that which is not-self should be put away by ending lust for these objects of lust.

PTS: By Without A Self (2), III.149

[145] Tatiya Anatta Sutta.m, III.178

Shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and consciousness are not-self and lustful desire for that which is not-self should be put away by ending lust for these objects of lustful desire.

BD:
PTS: By Without A Self (3), III.149

[146] Nibbidaabahula (aka Kulaputtena Dukkhaa) Sutta.m, III.179

The Buddha describes living the Dhamma of the Dhamma as living making much of weariness (having had enough of) of shape, sense-experience, perception own-making and sense-consciousness. So living he understands, understanding he is liberated.
Here we have the definition for the 'anudhamma' in the compound 'dhamma-anudhamma' (things-following after-the teachings; or forms following after the Teaching; or 'Doctrine-following forms' Dhamma-corolaries?). That is, it is along the lines of 'following the Form of the Teaching', 'walking it like you talk it'. Woodward notes: 'conformity to rule,' Bhk. Bodhi: 'what accords with the Dhamma.'

PTS: By the Clansman from Suffering, III.150
WP: Engrossed in Revulsion, I.977

[147] Aniccaanupassanaa (aka Kulaputtena Dukkhaa) Sutta.m, III.179

The Buddha describes living the Dhamma of the Dhamma as living seeing inconstance in shape, sense-experience, perception own-making and sense-consciousness. So living he understands, understanding he is liberated.

PTS: By the Clansman from Suffering 2, III.150
WP: Contemplating Impermanence, I.978

[147a] Dukkhaanupassanaa (aka Kulaputtena Dukkhaa) Sutta.m, III.180

The Buddha describes living the Dhamma of the Dhamma as living seeing pain in shape, sense-experience, perception own-making and sense-consciousness. So living he understands, understanding he is liberated.
This sutta does not appear in PTS Pali or in Woodward's translation. This is very probably an error. It does occur in the BJT Pali (although with an error that looks like it was an after-thought) and in the CSCD Pali used by the Bhk. Bodhi Wisdom Publications ed. and it belongs here by the logic of the usual construction of this series. Both have been constructed here following the pattern of the previous sutta. To avoid renumbering or having duplicate sutta numbers 'a' has been appended to the previous sutta number for this sutta.

PTS: By the Clansman from Suffering 2a, III.150
WP: (148): Contemplating Suffering, I.978

[148] Anattaanupassanaa (aka Kulaputtena Dukkhaa) Sutta.m, III.180

The Buddha describes living the Dhamma of the Dhamma as living seeing non-self in shape, sense-experience, perception own-making and sense-consciousness. So living he understands, understanding he is liberated.
Note: Sutta numbers for the Wisdom Publication edition and the BJT and CSCD Pali from this point to the end of this chapter are off by 1.
The PTS naming of Iis 146-148 seem to me to need rethinking. Bhk. Bodhi has: 'Engrossed in Revulsion', Contemplating Impermanence ... Suffering ... Nonself' which is more logical. To retain the PTS 'by the clansman' (and all of these suttas from 137 on should really be 'by way of ...') they should be: 'By the clansman: aversion; ... impermanence ... suffering ... no soul.'

PTS: By the Clansman from Suffering 3, III.150
WP: (149) Contemplating Nonself, I.978

III.V. Di.t.thi Vagga, III.180

[149] Ajjhatta Sutta.m, III.180

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness personal well-being and pain arise and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.

PTS: Personal (inward), III.150
WP: (150) Internally, I.978

[150] Eta.m Mama Sutta.m, III.181

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness the view 'This is mine, this is me, this is my self' arises and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.

PTS: This is Mine, III.151
WP: (151) This Is Mine, I.979

[151] So Attaa (aka Eso Attaa) Sutta.m, III.182

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness the view 'This self, this world, this will become constant, stable, forever incorruptible' arises and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.

PTS: This is the Self of Me, III.151
WP: (152) The Self, I.979

[152] No ca Me Siyaa Sutta.m, III.183

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness the view 'An' not 'were this', and not ''tis my', were no 'will be', nor 'will be mine' arises and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.
Once again we have this very curious saying. Woodward doubts his own translation. I suggest the doubt that arises is a consequence of the possibility of this saying being heard in the original in multiple meanings according to context. "If I had not held such a thing to be mine in the past, it would not be mine now, if I do not hold such a thing to be mine in the present it will not become mine in the future." Substitute 'this pleasurable thing' for 'such a thing'; then substitute 'this painful thing' for 'such a thing' and reflect on the change in attitude that results.

PTS: And If It Be Not Mine, III.152
WP: (153) It Might Not Be For Me, I.980

[153] Micchaa-Di.t.thi Sutta.m, III.184

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness mistaken view arises and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.
'Micchaa' should not be being translated 'wrong'. It is not 'wrong' it is 'mis'-something; mis-taken, mis-guided, mis-ccha ... . In the same way 'sammaa' should not be being translated 'right' although in that case there is etymological justification. The idea is not of right and wrong as we understand it, it is of 'the best way' versus all other ways. You say 'right' and that makes all other ways 'wrong' and you have set yourself in opposition to the world. The object is not to be in opposition to the world. It is to not be in opposition to or in favor of anything in the world. 'Sammaa di.t.thi' is the 'consummate', 'correct', 'upright' course for those who'se aim is to escape pain. 'Micchaa' is 'low' or 'misguided,' 'mistaken', etc.

PTS: Wrong, III.153
WP: (154) Wrong View, I.980

[154] Sakkaaya-Di.t.thi Sutta.m, III.185

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness the view that there is only one correct way of seeing things with regard to body arises and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things. See the discussion of Sakkaya in the forum.

PTS: The Person-Pack, III.153
WP: (155) Identity View, I.981

[155] Attaanu-Di.t.thi Sutta.m, III.185

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness views about the self arise and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.
Bhk. Bodhi's note here essentially applies all the arguments made for the previous sutta to this sutta. See the discussion of Sakkaya in the forum. I believe the distinction is being made between views of 'things in general' and views of 'self.'

PTS: About the Self, III.153
WP: (156) View of Self, I.981

[156] Pa.thama Abhinivesa Sutta.m, III.186

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness there arises a tendency to bondage to the yokes to rebirth and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.
Sa~n~nojanaabhinivesa-vinibandhaati. One word. A compound. Not three separate ideas. Something like not giving up in spite of seeing the danger, such as with people who cannot give up smoking tobacco. "OK so it's going to kill me and I'm going to be reborn, but I want do do it anyway."

PTS: Dependence, III.154
WP: (157) Adherence, I.982

[157] Dutiya Abhinivesa Sutta.m, III.187

The Buddha teaches that because of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness there arises a tendency to attachment to a bondage to the yokes to rebirth and that the escape therefrom is through seeing the inconstance, pain, and non-self in these things.
Sa~n~nojanaabhinivesa-vinibandhaajjhosaanaa. One word. A compound. Not four separate ideas. An intensification of the previous.

PTS: Dependence 2, III.154
WP: (158) Adherence 2, I.982

[158] Anandena Sutta.m, III.187

The Buddha gives Ananda as a subject for meditation the idea of impermanance, pain, and not self of shape, sense-experience, perception, own-making and sense-consciousness.

PTS: By Ananda, III.154
WP: (159) Ananda, I.982


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Khandhasamyutta]  [Radhasamyutta]  [Ditthisamyutta]  [Okkantikasamyutta]  [Uppadasamyutta]  [Kilesasamyutta]  [Sariputtasamyutta]  [Nagasamyutta]  [Supannasamyutta]  [Gandhabbakayasamyutta]  [Valahasamyutta]  [Vacchagottasamyutta]  [Jhana- (or Samadhi-) samyutta]

 


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