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The Pali is transliterated as Velthuis (aaiiuu.m'n~n.t.d.n.l). Alternatives:
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Index of the Suttas of the
Majjhima Nikaaya
Book I

Muula-Pa.n.naasa-Paa.li - The Root 50

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

SBB: Sacred Books of the Buddhists, Further Dialogues of the Buddha, Volume I, R. Chalmers, trans. (Suttas 1-76)
pdfFD I

PTS: Pali Text Society Majjhima Nikaaya, Volume 1 Suttas 1-76. The Pali Text Society Pali text ed. by V. Trenckner.

BJT: The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Majjhima Nikaaya, Volume 1 Suttas 1-76.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT]. Much, but not all of it is unabridged and has been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many of the suttas have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: Middle Length Sayings of the Buddha, Volume I, I.B. Horner, trans.
pdfMLS Volume I
ATI: Translations by Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others.
PP [Path Press]: Chalmers, Majjhima Nikaya, PDFMN 1 ~Naa.namo.li PDF for on line viewing. Volume 1 of the Bhikkhu ~Naa.namo.li 3-volume manuscript used as the basis for the Bhk. Bodhi edited edition. "Manuscript" here means hand written! and his script is no easy thing to read. Note that the PDF file is very large.
WP: Wisdom Publications, The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, Bhk. ~Naa.namoli translation, edited and revised by Bhk. Bodhi.
MNL: Sutta translations by Sister Upalavanna.
BD: Suttas translated by M. Olds.
PP: (Path Press):

 


1. Muulapariyaaya Vagga

1. Muulapariyaaya Sutta.m, I.1

The first sutta of the Majjhima Nikaya. Here the Buddha reveals the root concepts of all things.
Here the Buddha reveals the root concepts of all things.
In it's expanded form (found in my translation) it is certainly a hypnotic spell, and will, as if by magic, take one back to the very origins of the world. It builds up from that by way of fundamental concepts at the root of all things, verbal and physical and beyond to Nibbana. It is an excellent sutta, by the way, for learning the Pali language.

SBB: Muula-Pariyaaya-Sutta.m, How States Of Consciousness Originate, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 1
PTS: Discourse on the Synopsis of Fundamentals, Horner, trans., I.3
WP: The Root of All Things, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., I.83
Pali Buddhist Review, Vol.5 #1-2 The first article is the Bhikkhu ~Naa.namoli translation. Slightly different than the version edited by Bhk. Bodhi.
PP: The Root of All Ideas, Bhikkhu ~Naa.namoli trans. (html formatted; transcribed from his handwritten manuscript by Path Press)
ATI: The Root Sequence Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: The Root of All Evil, Olds, trans.
MNL: Origin and Behaviour of All Thoughts

BD: Mulapariyaya Resources Contents Page
Examining the Mulapariyaya
The Gotamaka Olds, trans.
Mulapariyaya Download Package (the Olds, trans. set up for printing)
PTS: The Gotamaka Woodward, trans.
The Jataka Story Rouse, trans.

2. Sabbaasava Sutta.m, I.6

The Buddha describes how one who applies his mind studiously to the point is able to rid himself of disrupting influences in seven ways: by seeing them as problems; by self-control, by proper use; by patience; by avoidance; by elimination; and by awakening. Examples of each case are given.

SBB: Sabb-Aasava-Sutta.m, Coping with Cankers, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 4
BS (Buddhist Suttas): All the Asavas, Rhys Davids, T., trans.
PTS: Discourse on All the Cankers, Horner, trans., I.8
WP: All the Taints, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 91
ATI: All the Fermentations, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: All Desires Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: All the Influences, outline, Olds, trans.

3. Dhamma-Daayaada Sutta.m, I.12

The Buddha urges the bhikkhus to become heirs of Dhamma, not of worldly things. By heirs of Dhamma he explains, he means putting the Dhamma into practice as he himself puts it into practice. Sariputta follows up on this exhortation with details. It is by not putting this Dhamma into practice as the Buddha did that senior bhikkhus, middle-ranked bhikkhus and juniors, one and all come to blameworthiness, and it is by putting it into practice in this way that one and all come to praiseworthiness.

SBB: Dhamma-Daayaada-Sutta.m, Unworldly Goods, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 9
PTS: Discourse on Heirs of Dhamma, Horner, trans., I.16
MNL: To Inherit the Teaching Sister Upalavanna, trans.
WP: Heirs in Dhamma, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 97

4. Bhaya-Bherava Sutta.m, I.16

Brahman Janussoni questions the Buddha about the fears and distractedness of mind that arise on living alone in the wilderness. The Buddha explains that for those with corrupt behavior in body, speech and thought; with passionate desires, corrupt at heart, lazy, nervous, doubt-ridden, proud and arrogant, fearful, hungary for fame and gains, weak in energy, confused, without concentration, and weak in wisdom such a life does inspire fear, but for one without these corruptions such a life strengthens one in pursuit of the goal.

SBB: Bhaya-Bherava-Sutta.m, Of Braving Fears, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 12
PTS: Discourse on Fear and Dread, Horner, trans., I.21
WP: Fear and Dread, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 102
ATI: Fear and Terror, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: Great Fear Sister Upalavanna, trans.

5. Ana'nga.na Sutta.m, I.24

Sariputta and Maha Moggallana engage in a dialogue which points out the advantages of self awareness when it comes to character faults.

SBB: Ananga.na-Sutta.m, Of Blemishes, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 18
PTS: Discourse on No Blemishes, Horner, trans., I.31
WP: Without Blemishes, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 108
MNL: Blemishes Sister Upalavanna, trans.

6. Aakankheyya Sutta.m, I.33

Gotama emphasizes again and again the importance of perfecting ethical behavior, internal tranquillity of heart, not dispising jhana practice, penetrating insight, and the making much of empty places for the gaining of every stage in his system from the very most elementary to the most advanced.

SBE: If He Should Desire, T.W. Rhys Davids, Buddhist Suttas, Volume XI of the Sacred Books of the East,
Buddhism in Translations
MN 6: Aaka.nkheyya-sutta. (Excerpt) Warren, trans.
SBB: Aakankheyya-Sutta.m, Of Yearnings, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 23
PTS: Discourse on What one may Wish, Horner, trans., I.41
WP: If A Bhikkhu Should Wish, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 115
MNL: If the Bhikkhu Desires Sister Upalavanna, trans.

7. Vatthuupama Sutta.m, I.36

The Buddha likens a dirty cloth incapable of taking dye to the mind corrupted by greed and covetousness, malevolence, anger, malice, hypocrisy, spite, envy, stinginess, deceit, treachery, obstinacy, impetuosity, arrogance, price and conceit - incapable of attaining a good rebirth. He then likens the cleansing of a dirty piece of cloth that renders it capable of taking dye to the process of cleansing the mind of these corruptions, and he describes this cleansing process.

SBB: Vatthuupama-Sutta.m, On Fulling, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 26
PTS: Discourse on the Simile of the Cloth, Horner, trans., I.45
WP: The Simile of the Cloth, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 118
ATI: The Simile of the Cloth, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Simile of the Cloth, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

8. Sallekha Sutta.m, I.40

Maha Cunda approaches the Buddha to ask how to eliminate ideas of 'I' and 'mine'. The Buddha's response is to give him pairs of opposites to be resolved upon, thought of, used as guides to follow, things leading upward and which will scour out ideas of 'I' and 'Mine.'
The fourty-four things are each repeated in accordance with these six ways of dealing with them. This is definately a 'scouring out' not an expunging! Ms. Horner has fallen victim to the challenge to the memory and changed her translation in mid-stream in this sutta which can lead to the misperception that there are a different fourty-four things being spoken of after the first two cycles. I have noted the change on her translation.

SBB: Sallekha-Sutta.m, Of Expunging, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 29
PTS: Discourse on Expunging, Horner, trans., I.51
WP: Effacement, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 123
ATI: The Discourse on Effacement, Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
MNL: Purity, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: Hoeing the Row, Olds, trans.

9. Sammaa-Di.t.thi Sutta.m, I.46

Sariputta explains the path to attaining of consummate view in thirty two different ways. See the discussion of this sutta for some interesting points.

SBB: Sammaa-Di.t.thi-Sutta.m, Right Ideas, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 33
PTS: Discourse on Perfect View, Horner, trans., I.57
WP: Right View, Ñanamoli Thera trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 132
ATI: The Discourse on Right View, Ñanamoli Thera trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., (@ Same as WP link but w/o footnotes)
Right View, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: Right View, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
Discussion

10. Satipa.t.thaana Sutta.m, I.55

The short version of the very famous sutta which gave rise to the mindfulness movement. The Buddha deaches a method for liberation based on minding the body, sense-experience, mental states and the Dhamma.

SBB: Sati-Pa.t.thaana-Sutta.m, On Mindfulness, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 41
PTS: Discourse on the Applications of Mindfulness, Horner, trans., I.70
WP: The Foundations of Mindfulness, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 145
ATI: The Great Establishing of Mindfulness Discourse, Revised Edition. Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
Nyanasatta Thera, trans.
Soma Thera, trans.
MNL: Establishing Mindfulness, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: The Spell of Four Satisfactions, Olds, trans.

BD: Satipatthana Resources Contents Page (Check this page for information on the MahaSatipatthana Sutta.m, the Digha Nikaya version of this sutta and for resources for researching the technique for putting this sutta into practice)

2. Siihanaada Vagga

11. Cuu.la-Siihanaada Sutta.m, I.63

The Buddha explains the logic behind the difference between the Buddhist proclaiming faith in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha and those of other beliefs proclaiming faith in their teacher, teachings and fellow-believers.
A very interesting sutta! Essentially the difference is in the perception that the Buddha's system works or ought to work in accomplishing what is in effect the goal of all seekers, that there is nothing left unexplained, and that since this is not the case in other faiths, that the faith of those who follow such is never, can never be fully vested. The inference is that faith is not fully vested by a Buddhist until such time as he has perceived that the system works, or ought to work.

SBB: Cuu.la-Siihanaada-Sutta.m, The Short Challenge, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 42
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the Lion's Roar, Horner, trans., I.85
WP, ATI: The Shorter Discourse on the Lion's Roar, Ñanamoli Thera trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 159
MNL: A Minor Lion's Roar, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

12. Mahaa Siihanaada Sutta.m, I.68

A bhikkhu who left the order is going around saying that there is nothing extraordinary about Gotama or his doctrine. Gotama, hering of this persons opinion replies with a wide-ranging rebuttal listing the wonderous aspects of his awakening and the scope of his knowledge.

SBB: Mahaa-Siihanaada-Sutta.m, The Long Challenge, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 45
PTS: Greater Discourse on the Lion's Roar, Horner, trans., I.91
WP, ATI: The Greater Discourse on the Lion's Roar, Ñanamoli Thera trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 164
MNL: The Major Lion's Roar, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
Discussion

13. Mahaa Dukkhakkhandha Sutta.m, I.83

A detailed exposition of what constitutes the pleasure, the danger, and the escape from the five senses, forms, and sense experience.

SBB: Mahaa-Dukkha-kkhandha-Sutta.m, The Longer Story of Ill, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 59
PTS: Greater Discourse on the Stems of Anguish, Horner, trans., I.110
WP: The Greater Discourse on the Mass of Suffering, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 179
ATI: The Greater Discourse on the Mass of Suffering, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Major Mass of Unpleasantness, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

14. Cuu.la Dukkhakkhandha Sutta.m I.91

Mahanama the Sakkyan, lamenting over his state of confusion with regard to pleasures of the senses, is given a detailed exposition of what constitutes the pleasure and the danger of the five senses, the thing that is binding Mahanama to confusion, and the way the Buddha himself escaped such confusion. The Buddha then describes an encounter with some Jains wherein he defeats their claim that the end of pain is to be got through pain by showing them that they are practicing their painful austerities without any support in knowledge or understanding and concludes with a description of the exceptional pleasure which he is able to attain.

SBB: Cuu.la-Dukkha-kkhandha-Sutta.m, The Brief Story of Ill, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 66
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the Stems of Anguish, Horner, trans., I.119
WP: The Shorter Discourse on the Mass of Suffering, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 186
ATI: The Lesser Discourse on the Mass of Suffering, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Minor Mass of Unpleasantness, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

15. Anumaana Sutta.m I.95

Maha Moggallana gives the bhikkhus a discourse on self-evaluation.

SBB: Anumaana-Sutta.m, Reflection, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 69
PTS: Discourse on Measuring in Accordance With, Horner, trans., I.124
WP: Inference, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., I.190
MNL: Self Observation, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

16. Ceto-Khila Sutta.m, I.101

Five things that are like spikes through the heart.

Buddhist Suttas: Barreness And Bondage, Rhys Davids, T., trans.
SBB: Ceto-Khila-Sutta.m, The Heart's Fallows and Bondages, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 71
PTS: Discourse on Mental Barrenness, Horner, trans., I.132
WP: The Wilderness in the Heart, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 194
MNL: The Arrow in the Mind, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

17. Vana-Pattha Sutta.m, I.104

The Buddha gives a dissertation on how to evaluate whether or not a bhikkhu should continue to live in a forest, in a small town, in a city, in a district or dependent on the support of an individual.
The method of evaluation is that suggested for all persons. See: How to Judge from Personal Experience. A very useful sutta for day-to-day practice.

SBB: Vana-Pattha Sutta.m, Ubi Bene, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 74
PTS: Discourse on the Forest Grove, Horner, trans., I.136
WP: Jungle Thickets, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 198
MNL: The Ways of the Forest, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

18. Madhu-Pi.n.dika Sutta.m, I.108

The Buddha cuts off an argumentative questioner by telling him that in his teaching there is no arguing with anyone about anything and by this he is free. In repeating the insident to the bhikkhus he is questioned as to what this teaching is that argues with no one about anything. The Buddha explains in brief that it is by having no interest in the obsessions and perceptions that assail the mind. Then further the bhikkhus ask for a clarification of this of Maha Kaccana, who speaks of the obsessions and perceptions that arise from sense experience.
Mrs. Horner, following the Pali, abridges two repetitions of the main body of this sutta. The abridgments in the Pali are not indicated as abridgments (by the usual "...pe...") but are done with summary statements. The usual case would have been that the monks and then the Buddha would have repeated all that which had been said and done in each case (each repetition making precise recollection more likely and testifying to the veracity of the testimony). This method of abridgment alone speaks to the fact that the Majjhima was compiled later than either the Anguttara Nikaya or the Samyutta Nikaya. It represents a lessening (however slight) of the respect for precision in recounting the events and sayings of the Buddha, a degradation likely resulting from the arising of the written text. As with cell-phone texting today [Monday, November 16, 2015 6:40 AM] and e-mail yesterday and television before that and radio before that and writing before that, each new generation of communication and memory enhansing devices destroys rather than inhances communication while degrading our ability to remember.

SBB: Madhu-Pi.n.dika Sutta.m, Honeyed Lore, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 75
PTS: Discourse of the Honey-ball, Horner, trans., I.141
WP: The Honey Ball, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 201
ATI: The Ball of Honey, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Honey Ball, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

19. Dvedhaa-Vitakka Sutta.m, I.114

The Buddha describes a method for categorizing thought which makes it less difficult to supress disadvantageous thoughts, still advantageous thoughts and attain tranquillity of mind.

SBB: Dvedhaa-Vitakka Sutta.m, On Counter-Irritants, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 79
PTS: Discourse on the Twofold Thought, Horner, trans., I.148
ATI: Two Sorts of Thinking, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: Two Kinds of Thought, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 207
MNL: The Twofold Thought Processes, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: Splitting Up Thought, Olds, trans.
MISC: Two Kinds of Thoughts, Ven. Punnaji, trans.

20. Vitakka-Sa.n.thaana Sutta.m, I.118

The Buddha describes five stands the seeker after higher states of mind can adopt in his effort to eliminate unwanted, degenerate, debilitating thoughts.

SBB: Dvedhaa-Vitakka Sutta.m, On Counter-Irritants, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 82
PTS: Discourse on the Forms of Thought, Horner, trans., I.152
WP: The Removal of Distracting Thoughts, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 211
ATI: The Relaxation of Thoughts, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
The Removal of Distracting Thoughts, Soma Thera, trans.
MNL: The Discursively Thinking Mind, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
MISC: Technique of Calming Thoughts, Ven. Punnaji, trans.

BD: 2500 Years Before Freud outline, discussion

3. Tatiya Vagga

21. Kakacuupama Sutta.m, I.122

A famous sutta dealing with the idea that the student of this system should not concern himself with worldly matters, even those so close to home as the abuse of nuns ... to say nothing of abuse of chickens ... (or one might say: concern as to the contents of one's own bowl, let alone the contents of your neighbours bowl) ... also dealing with the need for patience and endurance when faced with disagreeable speech (true or false) ... to be counteracted by training in a heart of friendliness towards one and all.

The Venerable Moliyaphagguna is too attached to the nuns and whenever anyone speaks in dispraise of them he raises a legal issue. He is brought before the Buddha who says this is unworthy behavior of one having gone forth out of faith, and says (my boldface italics):

Wherefore, Phagguna,
even if anyone face to face with you
should speak dispraise of those nuns,
even so should you, Phagguna,
get rid of those which are worldly desires,
those which are worldly thoughts;
and you, Phagguna,
should train yourself thus:

'Neither will my mind become perverted,
nor will I utter an evil speech,
but kindly and compassionate will I dwell
with a mind of friendhness and void of hatred.'

This attitude of detachment from what goes on in the world (and by 'world' is meant any form of individualized existence, including in heaven or identification with Brahmaa) is extremely important and so totally different than what is taught in virtually every religion in the world that it needs to be brought up again and again. Trying to become a world reforming activist Buddhist is the single biggest mistake being made by people entering the Buddhist Order in these times [Sunday, November 17, 2013 4:29 AM], and it is also at the root of the difference between what is taught in the Pali and what is being taught by the Mahayanist schools.

SBB: Kakacuupama Sutta.m, The Parable of the Saw, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 85
PTS: Discourse on the Parable of the Saw, Horner, trans., I.159
WP: The Simile of the Saw, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 217
ATI: The Simile of the Saw, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Simile of the Saw, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
Discussion

22. Alagadduupama Sutta.m, I.130

A wide-ranging very famous sutta that begins with a forceful teaching on the dangers of indulgence in sense pleasures. This sutta contains two famous similies: the similie of the snake illustrating how a wrong grasp of the Dhamma is like taking hold of a poisonous snake from the wrong end; and the simile of the raft illustrating how the Dhamma should be used to attain it's ends and then be let go. The sutta concludes with a thorough examination of the way 'not self' should be considered.
The interesting question here is why would Arittha hang on so stubbornly to his view about the harmlessness of sense-pleasure indulgence? It is possible of course that he was just a fool (but he was not unskilled in meditation, see: SN 5.54.6 where Gotama thought enough of him to give him special instruction on the in-and-out-breathing practice). But the likelihood is that he was trapped by a perception that befalls one who holds the view that there is no self. In this view a number of very dangerous conclusions can be reached because there is perceived to be no individuality there to experience the consequences of deeds. This would justify the simile of the snake and would explain the long dissertation that follows concerning the 'not-self' position. The presence here of the simile of the raft might also be explained as a hint to Arittha that if even the Dhamma could be let go, he could certainly let go his view. There is also in this sutta a very interesting remark made by Gotama as to constructing theories about the self where he states that even if there were a self that was incomprehensible, it would be foolishness to form theories about it. This statement is a little obscure and is made only in this sutta and has caused some confusion. Ms. Horner's translation is the most potentially misleading. The idea is that it is shown that examining things as they really are, there is no comprehension of a self possible, BUT even if there were a self that was incomprehensible, it would be foolish to speculate about it because it's paramaters could not be encompassed by speculations made within the scope of comprehension. This is not, as Ms. Horner's translation would indicate, an asertion that there is a self.

SBB: Alagadduupama Sutta.m, The Venomous Snake, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 90
PTS: Discourse on the Parable of the Water-snake, Horner, trans., I.167
WP: The Simile of the Snake, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 224
BPS: The Snake Simile Nyanaponika Thera, trans.
ATI: The Water-Snake Simile, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Simile of the Snake, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
Norwegian: Lignelsen om flåten, Lie trans.

BD: The Simile of the Snake discussion
"Not-Self" not "No Self" discussion

23. Vammiika Sutta.m, I.142

The Buddha explains a riddle which details the process of awakening.

SBB: Vammiika-Sutta.m, The Smouldering Ant-Hill, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 100
PTS: Discourse on the Anthill, Horner, trans., I.183
WP: The Ant-hill, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 237
BD: The Anthill, Olds, trans.
SWE: nor Liknelsen om myrstacken, Jönhagen, trans.
MNL: The Simile of the Ant Hill, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

24. Ratha-Viniita Sutta.m, I.145

The Venerable Sariputta having heard a good report about the Venerable Punna Mantaniputto tracks him down and questions him about attaining Nibbana.

SBB: Ratha-Viniita-Sutta.m, On Relays, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 103
PTS: Discourse on the Relays of Chariots, Horner, trans., I.187
ATI: Relay Chariots, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Simile of the Relay of Chariots, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

25. Nivaapa Sutta.m, I.151

The Buddha provides a complex simile illustrating by way of a herd of deer and a crop of corn set up to trap it the relationship of the arahant to the realm of the senses.
This is a mind-bending sutta, intended I believe, by way of its convoluted repetitions, to exercise and create in the mind of the listener a depth and objectivity of perception (so and so many removes from 'one-to-one') that closely resembles the perception of the arahant. A really valuable sutta in the way it describes the relationship of the arahant to this world, that is, that the Arahant still feeds off this world, but because of his habitat is invisible to Mara, Death, the Evil One.

SBB: Nivaapa-Sutta.m, Gins and Snares, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 108
PTS: Discourse on Crops, Horner, trans., I.194
WP: The Bait, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 246
MNL: The Simile of the Deer Feeder, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

26. Ariya-Pariyesanaa Sutta.m, I.160

The Buddha describes the method of his quest for Nibbana as consisting of avoiding that which was, like himself at that time, subject to change and pain, and seeking only for that which lead to the unborn, the secure from bondage, Nibbana.

Buddhism in Translations: The Summum Bonum, Warren, trans.
SBB: Ariya-Pariyesanaa-Sutta.m, The Noble Quest, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 113
PTS: Discourse on the Ariyan Quest, Horner, trans., I.203
WP: The Noble Search, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 253
ATI: The Noble Search Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Noble Search, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

27. Cuu.la Hatthi-Padopama Sutta.m, I.175

The Buddha teaches brahman Janussoni a way to confidently come to the conclusion that the Buddha is an awakened one: an instruction that delineates the steps from layman to arahant in great detail.

SBB: Cuu.la Hatthi-Padopama-Sutta.m, The Short Trail, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 125
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the Simile of the Elephant's Footprint, Horner, trans., I.220
WP: The Shorter Discourse on the Simile of the Elephant's Footprint, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 269
ATI: The Shorter Elephant Footprint Simile, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Minor Discourse of the Simile of the Elephant's Footprint, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

28. Mahaa Hatthi-Padopama Sutta.m I.184

Sariputta teaches the bhikkhus about how the scope of the Four Truths encompasses the Paticca Samuppada by way of focusing on the details of sense-experience to create detachment.

SBB: Mahaa Hatthi-Padopama-Sutta.m, The Long Trail, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 133
PTS: Greater Discourse on the Simile of the Elephant's Footprint, Horner, trans., I.230
WP: The Greater Discourse on the Simile of the Elephant's Footprint, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 278
ATI: The Great Elephant Footprint Simile Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Major Disourse on the Simile of the Elephant's Footprint, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

29. Mahaa Saaropama Sutta.m, I.192

The Buddha uses a simile to warn the bhikkhus not to mistake fame, or achievement of ethical culture, or attainment of concentration, or attainment of knowledge and vision for attainment of permanent freedom disconnected from Time, which is the goal of his system.
There is a problem with the last section of the Pali. The problem is either with the PTS Pali or the BJT/CSCD (BBS and SBJ eds.,) or all of the above. In the PTS the the first half of the last section, before the simile, has the bhikkhu attaining release from things connected to time which is then cast as a position from which he is likely to fall away. The second half of the PTS version of the last section has the bhikkhu attaining release from things not connected to time which is then cast as a position from which there is no falling away. The other versions of the Pali and the translations (all the other translations) have the first and second halfs of the section as identical. See the discussion of this sutta.

SBB: Mahaa Saaropama-Sutta.m, Timber: Or Discoveries, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 138
PTS: Greater Discourse on the Simile of the Pith, Horner, trans., I.238
WP: The Greater Discourse on the Simile of the Heartwood, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 286
MNL: The Major Discourse on Heartwood, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
ATI: The Longer Heartwood-simile Discourse, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
BD: The Core of the Greater Heartwood Sutta. Discussion.

30. Cuu.la Saaropama Sutta.m, I.198

The Buddha uses a simile to teach brahman Pingalakoccha that in his system one must not mistake fame, or achievement of ethical culture, or attainment of concentration, or attainment of knowledge and vision for attainment of unshakable freedom of heart which is it's goal.

SBB: Cuu.la Saaropama-Sutta.m, More about Timber, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 143
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the Simile of the Pith, Horner, trans., I.245
WP: The Shorter Discourse on the Simile of the Heartwood, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 291
MNL: The Shorter Discourse on the Simile of the Heartwood, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
ATI: The Shorter Heartwood-simile Discourse, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
Discussion

4. Mahaa Yamaka Vagga

31. Cuu.la Gosi'nga Sutta.m, I.205

The Buddha visits the Anuruddhas and learns of their having attained arahantship.

SBB: Cuu.la Gosinga-Sutta.m, In Gosinga Wood, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 148
PTS: Lesser Discourse in Gosi'nga, Horner, trans., I.257
WP: The Shorter Discourse in Gosinga, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 301
MNL: The Minor Discourse in the Gosinga Forest, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

32. Mahaa Gosi'nga Sutta.m, I.212

A group of the Buddha's great disciples gather together on a beautiful moonlit night in Gosinga Woods with the air perfumed by the Sal Tree blossoms. They each, in turn, describe the sort of bhikkhu they feel would illuminate this woods. Then, unable to descide whose proposition was best, they visit the Buddha to ask his opinion. The Buddha approves all their opinions and adds his own contribution.
It is interesting to note here that Venerable Moggallaana the Great is referred to as being a talker on Dhamma where usually he is noted for his supreme magic powers.

SBB: Mahaa Gosinga-Sutta.m, The Shining Light, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 148
PTS: Greater Discourse in Gosi'nga, Horner, trans., I.263
WP: The Greater Discourse in Gosinga, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 307
MNL: The longer Discourse in the Gosinga Forest, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

33. Mahaa Gopaalaka Sutta.m, I.220

The Buddha likens eleven skills needed by the skillful cowherd to eleven skills needed by the skillful bhikkhu.

SBB: Mahaa Gopaalaka-Sutta.m, Pastoral Duties, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 157
PTS: Greater Discourse on the Cowherd, Horner, trans., I.271
WP: The Greater Discourse on the Cowherd, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 313
ATI: The Greater Cowherd Discourse, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Major Discourse on the Cowherd, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

34. Cuu.la Gopaalaka Sutta.m, I.225

The Buddha likens those seekers who follow a teacher who does not know what he is talking about to a herd of cows lead by a cowherd that sends his herd across a river where there is no ford.

SBB: Cuu.la Gopaalaka-Sutta.m, Pastos, Good and Bad, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 159
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the Cowherd, Horner, trans., I.277
WP: The Shorter Discourse on the Cowherd, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 319
MNL: The Minor Discourse on the Cowherd, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

35. Cuu.la Saccaka Sutta.m, I.227

Saccaka, who has been boasting and bragging that he can defeat the Buddha in debate when he meets him in debate is upset after his first utterance. The Buddha then teaches him Dhamma.
This is a wonderful example of old time debate. It also shows how politely and reasonably such a debate was conducted even when the consequences were as hair-raising as they are shown to be in this sutta. There is no attempt to bring the debate to a pre-mature conclusion simply because Saccaka feels bad. What our board monitors need to see is that by terminating debate for the sake of maintaining good feelings is preventing the discovery of deeper truths. We hang on to our beliefs; getting them destroyed is painful; going through that pain is the only way of reaching higher wisdom.
This debate also shows how a really wise debator takes defeat and turns it into an advantage.
This sutta concludes with an exchange which should put to rest all doubt about the impossibility of transference of kamma. Saccaka, in gratitude for his instruction, invites the Buddha and the sangha for a meal. To prepare the meal he asks his friends to donate to him what they feel they owe him. He then gives what he has received to the Buddha and the Sangha. Then he asks that the merit for such a meal be received by the doners. The Buddha explains that the doners have given to Saccaka and will receive kammic consequences that accord with the rebound from one such as him whereas Saccaka, who gave to the Buddha will receive the kammic consequences of one who has given to a Buddha. No transference of kamma.

Buddhism in Translations, MN 35 Warren, trans.
SBB: Cuu.la Saccaka-Sutta.m, Saccaka's Onslaught, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 162
PTS: Lesser Discourse to Saccaka, Horner, trans., I.280
WP: The Shorter Discourse to Saccaka, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 322
MNL: The Shorter Discourse to Saccaka, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
ATI: The Shorter Discourse to Saccaka, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
Discussion

36. Mahaa Saccaka Sutta.m, I.237

The Buddha teaches Saccaka about training the body and training the heart.
In this sutta we once again come upon Gotama's description of his extreme austerities in his attempt to attain Awakening, his subsequent rejection of such practices, and his recollection of an insident in his youth that pointed to a successful practice.
Sitting there he finds himself in a very peaceful state of mind which he describes in a formula that later becomes know as 'the First Jhaana' - 'knowing'; it is a point at which two things are seen with absolute clarity: 1. it is got by letting go of (separating from) lesser states; and 2. it is a higher form of happiness than sense pleasure; that is at this point one knows for certain one is on the right track.

Separated from Sensuaity,
Separated from Unskillful things,
With Thinking and With Pondering
with the Pleasureable-Enthusiasm born of Separation,
One enters and abides in the First Knowing.

Here we have, side-by-side, both the formula and an illuminating image of this entry point to the attaining of Awakening.

At ease sitting at the root of the rose-apple tree, the young prince is seen just prior to his entry into puberty (separated from sensuality). He is separated from his father and the commencement of the ceremony (separated from unskillful things), yet is observant of the situation. What you need to know is that the Plowing Ceremony is a 'rite of spring', a 'fertility rite', a ceremony that would introduce a youth to sensual pleasures.

SBB: Mahaa Saccaka-Sutta.m, Saccaka Again, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 170
PTS: Greater Discourse to Saccaka, Horner, trans., I.291
WP: The Greater Discourse to Saccaka, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 332
ATI: The Greater Discourse to Saccaka, (excerpt), Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Major Discourse to Saccaka, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
Discussion

37. Cuu.la Ta.nhaa Sa'nkhaya Sutta.m, I.251

A well-known and much loved sutta. Sakka, Ruler of the Devas, visits the Buddha and asks about the scope of understanding required of one to be able to know he is arahant. The Buddha instructs him, but Maha Moggallana, who was listening, doubts it has sunk in and visits Sakka in the Tavatimsa Realm. There he is put off with frivolities and in order to rouse Sakka to seriousness Maha Moggallana shakes Sakka's palace with his big toe. With his hair standing on end, Sakka gets down to business.

SBB: Cuu.la-Ta.nhaa-Sa'nkhaya-Sutta.m, Deliverance from Cravings, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 180
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the Destruction of Craving, Horner, trans., I.306
WP: The Shorter Discourse on the Destruction of Craving, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 344
MNL: The Shorter Discourse On the Destruction of Craving, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

38. Mahaa Ta.nhaa Sa'nkhaya Sutta.m, I.256

The well-known sutta in which the Buddha explains the idea that consciousness is a conditioned phenomena and is not the self that transmigrates from one birth to the next.
This is a very important sutta to understand clearly. (The Chalmers translation is too abridged to be of much help, see the other translations for a better perspective.)
All consciousness is a result of the coming together of conditions.
There are various sorts of consciousness depending on the conditions which give rise to it.
Consciousness is not a self that transmigrates from one existence to the next.
The subjective aparent continuity of individuality from moment to moment and life to life is a matter of illusion. A case of mistaken identity: Identification with conscousness assumed to be the continuation of an identification with consciousness that performed deeds with the intent of creating this consciousness.
After determining that it is individualized consciousness (among the various sorts of consciousness) that Sati believes transmigrates from birth to birth, the Buddha deals with that form of consciousness from the point of view of the factors on which it is dependent and the mechanism of rebirth itself. The mechanics of the arising of consciousnes in ordinary rebirth must be understood before it can be seen how there arises a second sort of consciousness that is not dependent on individualized existence.
There are then two general categories of consciousness: Consciousness conditioned by things of Time; and consciousness conditioned by things not of Time.
Consciousness conditioned by things of time (the six senses) is a thing of time and comes to an end.
This is the consciousness of the ordinary individual.
When consciousness is conditioned by consciousness of freedom from things of time, it is consciousness conditioned by things not of time.
That consciousness, though it is conditioned, has not been own-made, identified-with, and is not an 'existing thing' but is only a consciousness of not being a thing, is not identified-with as "I" or "mine", and because not dependent on something that comes to an end, does not itself come to an end and is the goal of this system.
Again: Consciousness arises dependedent on conditions.
If the conditions present are consciousness of freedom from things of Time, the resulting consciousness is consciousness of consciousness of things not of Time. It has arisen as a result of conditons, not as a result of the willing of an individual (i.e., own-making, or sankharaming.) Consciousness, freed from things of time, is unlimited, not bound to Time, deathless... Nirvana: Out of the Woods; Nibbana, unbound.
Returning to the sutta: An individual who sees consciousness like this does not speculate about the past, future or present nature of a self. He may have vision of past lives, but he also sees that none of them were the self of him. He knows of the future that there is no thing which will be identified with as the self. He knows of the present that there is no thing there that is the self. This is a simpler way of seeing things than the divisions that are created by the assumption of individuality and consequently he is not confused about things of the past, future or present. Things come to be as a consequence of conditions (kamma); without conditions they do not come to be; on the ending of the conditions that brought them about, they cease to be. For all things. Not just "me" or "them".
If you can see how ordinary rebirth-consciousness arises as a consequence of conditions, you can then see how with different conditions (consciousness of consciousness of things not of Time) a different sort of consciousness can arise and you can direct 'mind' to that second sort of consciousness which, unending, deathless, and free from time is clearly superior.

SBB: Mahaa-Ta.nhaa-Sa'nkhaya-Sutta.m, Consciousness A Process Only, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 183
PTS: Greater Discourse on the Destruction of Craving, Horner, trans., I.311
WP: The Greater Discourse on the Destruction of Craving, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 349
MNL: The Major Discourse on the Destruction of Craving, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
ATI: The Greater Craving-Destruction Discourse

39. Mahaa-Assapura Sutta.m, I.271

The Buddha gives the bhikkhus a full curiculum for the realization of Nibbana.

SBB: Mahaa-Assapura-Sutta.m, The Ideal Recluse, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 191
PTS: Greater Discourse at Assapura, Horner, trans., I.325
WP: The Greater Discourse at Assapura, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 362
ATI: The Greater Discourse at Assapura, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
PTS/BD: Greater Discourse at Assapura, Olds, excerpt of PTS trans.
MNL: The Longer Discourse in Assapura, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
Discussion

40. Cuu.la-Assapura Sutta.m, I.281

The Buddha explains the unreasonableness of such superficial practices as the wearing of robes, going naked, living in filth, ceremonial bathing, living at the root of a tree, eating according to a set regimin, chanting, or wearing matted hair in the hope of ridding one's self of malevolence, wrath, grudge-bearing, hypocracy, spite, jealousy, stingyness, treachery, craftyness, evil desires and wrong views. Then he explains the manner in which practicing friendliness, sympathy, empathy and detachment rids one of those bad characteristics and leads on to attaining arahantship.

SBB: Cuu.la-Assapura-Sutta.m, The Recluse's Regimen, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 199
PTS: Lesser Discourse at Assapura, Horner, trans., I.334
WP: The Shorter Discourse at Assapura, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 372
MNL: The Shorter Discourse in Assapura, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

5. Cuu.la Yamaka Vagga

41. Saaleyyaka Sutta.m, I.285

The Buddha explains to the people of Sala how it is that some end up being reborn in Hell and other bad states while others end up being reborn in Heavens and other good states.
On Chalmers' title: Weird = fate, destiny. Hence to a person able to see and alter events in the future; wizzard, > wierd'o = wizzard of.

SBB: Saaleyyaka-Sutta.m, Our Weird, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 202
PTS: Discourse to the People of Saalaa, Horner, trans., I.343
ATI: The Brahmans of Sala, Ñanamoli Thera, trans.
(Brahmans) of Sala, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Discourse Given at Saalaa, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
WP: The Brahmins of Sala, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 379

42. Vera~njaka Sutta.m, I.290

The Buddha, speaking to the householders of Veranja, explains in detail how it comes about that some people go to happy rebirths in the heavens and others end up in hell.

SBB: Vera~njaka-Sutta.m, Our Weird, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 207
PTS: Discourse to the People of Vera~njaa, Horner, trans., 349
WP: The Brahmins of Vera~njaa, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 386
MNL: The Discourse to the Householders of Veranjaka, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

43. Mahaa Vedalla Sutta.m, I.292

For the sake of teaching the bhikkhus gathered round, Sariputta and Maha Kotthita engage in a question and answer discussion that goes into subtle points of Dhamma.

SBB: Mahaa Vedalla-Sutta.m, The Long Miscellany, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 207
PTS: Greater Discourse of the Miscellany, Horner, trans., I.350
WP: The greater Series of Questions and Answers, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 387
ATI: The Greater Set of Questions-and-Answers, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Longer Discourse - Questions and Answers, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: Mahavedalla [outline], Olds, trans.

44. Cuu.la Vedalla Sutta.m, I.299

The lay follower Visakha asks his former wife, the nun Dhammadinna a series of questions concerning Dhamma and receives answers approved of later by the Buddha. The questions asked reveal a number of the more subtle points in understanding the internal make up of the Dhamma. This is definately a good sutta to compare with the Pali and other translations.

Buddhism in Translations, MN 44. Warren, trans.
SBB: Cuu.la Vedalla-Sutta.m, The Short Miscellany, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 213
PTS: Lesser Discourse of the Miscellany, Horner, trans., I.360
WP: The Shorter Series of Questions and Answers, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 396
ATI: The Shorter Set of Questions and Answers, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Shorter Discourse on Questions and Answers, Sister Upalavanna, trans. Discussion

45. Cuu.la Dhamma-Samaadaana Sutta.m, I.305

Four modes of practicing Dhamma: Pleasureable in the present with painful consequences; painful in the present with painful consequences; painful in the present with pleasurable consequences; and pleasurable in the present with pleasurable consequences.

SBB: Cuu.la Dhamma-Samaadaana-Sutta.m, On Living Up to Professions (1), Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 213
PTS: Lesser Discourse on the (Ways of) undertaking Dhamma, Horner, trans., I.368
WP: The Shorter Discourse on Ways of Undertaking Things, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 405
ATI: The Shorter Discourse on Taking on Practices, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
MNL: The Shorter Discourse on Observances, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

46. Mahaa Dhamma-Samaadaana Sutta.m, I.309

Four modes of practicing Dhamma: Pleasureable in the present with painful consequences; painful in the present with painful consequences; painful in the present with pleasurable consequences; and pleasurable in the present with pleasurable consequences. The same theme as the previous sutta, but differently expanded.
The four described differently than in the previous sutta and here given similies. Very good suttas to read when your practice seems to be resulting in nothing but grief. You stop drinking and find you have no friends; you stop killing and find your house full of cockroaches, etc. One of the most difficult barriers to overcome because it comes at the beginning of one's practice when one has very little experience to bolster one's will power.

SBB: Mahaa Dhamma-Samaadaana-Sutta.m, On Living Up to Professions (2), Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 219
PTS: Greater Discourse on the (Ways of) Undertaking Dhamma, Horner, trans., I.372
WP: The Greater Discourse on Ways of Undertaking Things, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 408
MNL: The Longer Discourse on Observances, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

47. Viima.msaka Sutta.m I.317

The Buddha goes into detail concerning how one should examine one who claims to have attained the goal.

SBB: Viima.msaka-Sutta.m, Study of the Truth-Finder, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 227
PTS: Discourse on Inquiring, Horner, trans., I.379
WP: The Inquirer, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 415
MNL: The Examination, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: The Good Example (1), Olds, trans. excerpt adapted from this sutta

48. Kosambiya Sutta.m, I.320

The Buddha explains how to think to achieve Stream-entry and then describes seven fruits of Stream-entry.
This description of the fruit of Stream-entry does not include the usual 'never again to be reborn in states lower than human birth, and rebirth only seven more times at most' but in some ways these are more valuable in that they deal with mental attitudes one acquires which are extraordinarily re-assuring and form the basis for enthusiasm for greater effort at attainment.

SBB: Kosambiya-Sutta.m, Amity and Its Root, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 230
PTS: Discourse at Kosambii, Horner, trans., I.383
WP: The Kosambians, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 419
MNL: The Discourse at Kosambi, Sister Upalavanna, trans.
BD: The Good Example (2), Olds, trans. outline

49. Brahmaa Nimantanika Sutta.m, I.326

The Buddha visits Baka Brahma who has come to the belief that he is immortal. The Buddha disabuses him of this idea and demonstrates his authority with an act of psychic power.Each translator has his own notion of what the title of this sutta may mean. PED has the term 'nimantana' as 'invitation'. NI = in; MANT = mind, command; intend. Ms. Horner: 'Challenge'; Bhks. Thanissaro and Bhodi: 'invitation'; Sister Upalavanna: 'Address'. How about: 'All of the above.' A pun, meaning to address, and invite, and challenge. Address as in sword-fighting; invite as in kung-fu movies where one fighter indicates with his hand 'bring it on'; or the 'Invitation Hand' of Wu Dan kung-fu indicating that the opponent should commense if he is going to fight; a challenge to combat or to discovery.

SBB: Brahmaa Nimantanika-Sutta.m, Brahmaa's Appeal, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 234
PTS: Discourse on a Challenge to a Brahmaa, Horner, trans., I.388
ATI: The Brahma Invitation, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.
WP: The Invitation of a Brahmaa, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 424
MNL: An Address to Brahmaa, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

50. Maara Tajjaniya Sutta.m, I.332

Mara tries to upset Maha Moggallana and is told of Maha Moggallana's own experience as Mara attempting to upset bhikkhus where he ends up in Niraya with the body of a man and the head of a fish boiling for many hundreds of thousands of years. The gatha at the end is about as close to an old-time curse as is found in Buddhism. (But note that Moggallana clearly shows how this is not a curse, that he holds no ill-will, and that it is strictly this Mara's own deed that will bring about the dread consequences. In fact what we may be seeing here is the way the curse originated, that is as a simple statement of what a real seer sees as the consequences to someone of what they have done. Only later to be transformed into a wish.)

SBB: Maara Tajjaniya-Sutta.m, The Rebuke to Maara, Chalmers trans, Vol. I, pg 239
PTS: Discourse on a Rebuke to Mara, Horner, trans., I.395
WP: The Rebuke to Mara, Ñanamoli Thera, trans., Bhk. Bodhi, ed., 431
MNL: Frightening the Evil One, Sister Upalavanna, trans.

 


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