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Index to the Suttas of the Saɱyutta Nikāya
Mahā Vagga
Indriya Saɱyutta

Key

Index of Sutta Indexes


 

V. Mahā Vagga

PTS: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga ed. by M. Léon Feer, London: Pali Text Society 1898. The html formatted Pali Text Society edition of the Pali text.
BJT: Saɱyutta Nikāya Volume 5, Mahā-Vagga The Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series Pali text.

The Pali text for individual suttas listed below is adapted from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series [BJT], not from the PTS version. Each translation is linked to it's Pali version and to the PTS, Olds and where available to the ATI Bhk. Thanissaro translation, and each of these is in turn linked back to each of the others. Many, but not all have been checked against the Pali Text Society edition, and many have been reformatted to include the original Pali (and/or organizational) phrase and sentence breaks.

PTS: The Great Chapter, translated by F.L. Woodward,
WP: The Great Book, translated by Bhikkhu Bodhi
ATI: The translations of Bhikkhu Thanissaro and others originally located on Access to Insight,
BD: The translations of M. Olds.

IV. Indriya Saɱyutta, V.193

PTS: Kindred Sayings on the Faculties, V.169
WP: Connected Discourses on the Faculties, II.1668

I. Suddhika Vagga, V.193

[1] Suddhika Suttaɱ, V.193

The Buddha lists the five forces (indriyani).

PTS: Puritan, V.169
WP: Simple Version, II.1668

[2] Paṭhama Sota Suttaɱ, V.193

Understanding the five forces (indriana), their advantages, their disadvantages and the escape from them, one is called a Stream-winner and has escaped rebirth in hell or as an animal or in any state lower than human and is assured of reaching arahantship.

PTS: The Stream (a), V.169
WP: Stream-Enterer, II.1668

[3] Dutiya Sota Suttaɱ, V.193

Understanding the five forces (indriana), their arising, their setteling down and the escape from them, one is called a Stream-winner and has escaped rebirth in hell or as an animal or in any state lower than human and is assured of reaching arahantship.

PTS: The Stream (b), V.170
WP: Stream-Enterer 2, II.1668

[4] Paṭhama Araha Suttaɱ, V.194

Understanding the five forces (indriana), their advantages, their disadvantages and the escape from them and having become free without more to be done, one is called an Arahant, has destroyed the corrupting influences, has lived the godly life, done one's duty, won one's best interests, laid down the load, worn out the yokes to rebirth, become one released by the highest knowing.

PTS: Arahant (a), V.170
WP: Arahant, II.1669

[5] Dutiya Araha Suttaɱ, V.194

Understanding the five forces (indriana), their arising, their settling down and the escape from them and having become free without more to be done, one is called an Arahant, has destroyed the corrupting influences, has lived the godly life, done one's duty, won one's best interests, laid down the load, worn out the yokes to rebirth, become one released by the highest knowing.

PTS: Arahant (b), V.170
WP: Arahant 2, II.1669

[6] Paṭhama Samaṇabrāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, V.194

Whether or not one understands the five forces (indriana), their arising, their settling down and the escape from them and having become free without more to be done, is the mark of a seeker or Brahmin among seekers and brahmins and is the benefit of being a seeker or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (a), V.170
WP: ascetics and Brahmins, II.1669

[7] Dutiya Samaṇabrāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, V.195

Whether or not one understands the five forces (indriana), their arising, their settling down and the walk to walk to escape from them, is the mark of a seeker or Brahmin among seekers and brahmins and is the benefit of being a seeker or brahmin. Slightly more detailed than the previous.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (b), V.171
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins 2, II.1670

[8] Daṭṭhabba Suttaɱ, V.196

The Buddha describes where each of the forces is to be seen at work. An invaluable sutta for understanding the forces.

PTS: Point of View, V.171
WP: To Be Seen, II.1670

[9] Paṭhama Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ, V.196

The Buddha analyzes each of the five forces individually.
Bhk. Bodhi notes that in the analysis of satindriya, sati is described as memory rather than as attention as though this were a change. This is not a distinction to be found in the Pali, but only in the translations. Sati is always either 'mind' or 'memory' or 'recollection' or 'recollectedness' or in the case of 'minding' a form of remembering, and 'mind' is understood as the memory.

PTS: Analysis (a), V.172
WP: Analysis, II.1670

[10] Dutiya Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ, V.197

The Buddha analyzes each of the five forces individually. A deeper analysis than the previous.

PTS: Analysis (b), V.173
WP: Analysis 2, II.1671
ATI: Analysis of the Mental Faculties

II. Mudatara Vagga, V.199

[11] Paṭilābho Suttaɱ, V.199

The Buddha describes how to gain control of the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom.

PTS: Laying Hold, V.175
WP: Obtainment, II.1673

[12] Paṭhama Saŋkhitta Suttaɱ, V.200

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant.

PTS: In Brief (a), V.176
WP: In Brief, II.1674

[13] Dutiya Saŋkhitta Suttaɱ, V.200

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant. Then he points out that it is in this way that there is diversity in forces, diversity in fruition, diversity in powers, and diversity in peoples.

PTS: In Brief (b), V.176
WP: In Brief 2, II.1674

[14] Tatiya Saŋkhitta Suttaɱ, V.201

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant. Then he points out that it is in this way that those who master these things completely reach complete development while those who master them only partially reach only partial development, but that in every case some mastery brings some fruition.

PTS: In Brief (c), V.177
WP: In Brief 3, II.1674

[15] Paṭhama Vtthāra Suttaɱ, V.201

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant. In this sutta the list of degrees of accomplishment is somewhat expanded.

PTS: In Detail (a), V.177
WP: In Detail, II.1674

[16] Dutiya Vtthāra Suttaɱ, V.201

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant. Then he points out that it is in this way that there is diversity in forces, diversity in fruition, diversity in powers, and diversity in peoples.

PTS: In Detail (b), V.177
WP: In Detail 2, II.1675

[17] Tatiya Vtthāra Suttaɱ, V.202

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant. Then he points out that it is in this way that those who master these things completely reach complete development while those who master them only partially reach only partial development, but that in every case some mastery brings some fruition.

PTS: In Detail (c), V.177
WP: In Detail 3, II.1675

[18] Paṭipanna Suttaɱ, V.202

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant. But he who has neglected to develope these things at all is considered 'an outsider.'
A corrolary is that bhikkhus should be very careful in the way they toss around the term 'puthujjana', a very discouraging term for a layman to have directed at him. It is no easy thing to accomplish 'starting,' and beginners should be being encouraged rather than being made stepping stones for ignorant ego-building.

PTS: Practising, V.178
WP: Practising, II.1675

[19] Upasama Suttaɱ, V.202

The Buddha instructs a bhikkhu in the understanding of the phrase: 'Force-Complete'.

PTS: Tranquil, V.178
WP: Equipped, II.1676

[20] Āsavānaɱ Khaya Suttaɱ, V.203

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is through mastering the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom and by destroying the corrupting influences that one lives heart-free, wisdom-free.

PTS: Destruction of the Āsavas, V.178
WP: Destruction of the Taints, II.1676

III. Chaḷindriya-Vagga, V.203

[21] Nabbhava (or Ñānavā or Punabbhava) Suttaɱ, V.203

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus how it was by thoroughly understanding the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that he came to know the world and become self-awakened with the highest awakening, heart-freed, sure of freedom, certain that this was his last life, that rebirth was ended and there would be no more existing.

PTS: No More Becoming or The Knower, V.179
WP: Renewed Existence, II.1676

[22] Jīvita (Jīvit'indriya) Suttaɱ, V.204

The Buddha describes three forces: femininity, masculinity and living.

PTS: Vitality, V.179
WP: The Life Faculty, II.1677

[23] Ñāya (Aññ'indriya) Suttaɱ, V.204

The Buddha describes three forces: the force of knowing that one will know the unknown; the force of knowledge of the unknown; and the force of knowing.
The force of anticipation of knowing, the force of knowledge itself, and the force of knowing that knowledge. The knowledge here is 'añña' (Say: 'An-yeh') 'answer-knowing' sometimes translated 'omniscience'. Bhk. Bodhi: 'final knowledge'. It is a synonym for Arahantship. Bhikkhus who announce that they have attained the goal are said to 'declare añña.'

PTS: The Method, V.179
WP: The Faculty of Final Knowledge, II.1677

[24] Ekābhiñña (or Ekabījī) Suttaɱ, V.204

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus that it is the degree to which they have mastered faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom that determines their having attained the various degrees of accomplisment in his system from Faith Follower to Arahant.
This version introduces the 'one-seed man' and the clan-to-clan-goer and introduces the idea of the streamwinner that has just seven lives more to go. The one-seed man is described as of a lower degree than the once-returner but is described by the commentary as being it's equivalent, that is that he has but one more life to go before becoming an Arahant. The distinction may be in the abode, where the one-seeder may be reborn in one of the deva worlds, where the once-returner is reborn once more in this world and becomes arahant here. The scale is apparently based on the time needed to achieve arahantship (the deva world being of vastly longer duration) (but this sounds very much like the non-returner to me; perhaps the distinction in this case is that the deva world is not in the Pure Abodes). The clan-to-clan goer takes rebirth in two or three families before becoming arahant. Considering all the various possibilities it appears that the only real constant is that once one has become streamwinner one is assured of attaining arahantship within seven rebirths. The variations can be anywhere between attaining arahantship in this life, or immediately subsequent to death, to traveling from realm to realm up to the highest Pure Abode, to taking an arbitrary number of rebiths up to seven more, either as human or deva. Pretty much any variation one could imagine.

PTS: One-Seed-er, V.180
WP: One-Seeder, II.1677

[25] Suddhaka Suttaɱ, V.205

The Buddha describes six forces: that of the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind.

PTS: Puritan, V.181
WP: Simple Version, II.1677

[26] Sota or Sotāpanna Suttaɱ, V.205

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that understanding the arising, the settling down, the pleasure and the escape from the six forces is what qualifies one as a streamwinner.

PTS: Stream or Stream-winner, V.181
WP: Stream-Enterer, II.1678

[27] Paṭhama Arahatā Suttaɱ, V.205

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that understanding the arising, the settling down, the pleasure and the escape from the six forces and having freed one's self from them without residual fuel is what qualifies one as an arahant.
It is not sufficient to simply understand, the understanding must be applied and made into personal experience. It's like the difference between understanding that the flavor of a tomato is acid with sweet overtones, versus actually tasting the tomato.

PTS: Arahant or Enlightened (a), V.181
WP: Arahant, II.1678

[28] Dutiya Arahatā or Buddho Suttaɱ, V.

The Buddha tells the bhikkhus how it was by thoroughly understanding the arising, the settling down, the pleasure and the escape from the six forces and having freed himself from them without residual fuel that he came to know the world and become self-awakened with the highest awakening, heart-freed, sure of freedom, certain that this was his last life, that rebirth was ended and there would be no more existing.

PTS: Arahant or Enlightened (b), V.181
WP: Buddha, II.1678

[29] Paṭhama Samaṇabrāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, V.206

Whether or not one understands the six forces (indriani), their arising, their settling down and the escape from them, is the mark of a seeker or Brahmin among seekers and brahmins and is the benefit of being a seeker or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (a), V.182
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins, II.1679

[30] Dutiya Samaṇabrāhmaṇā Suttaɱ, V.206

Whether or not one understands the six forces (indriani), their arising, their settling down and the escape from them, is the mark of a seeker or Brahmin among seekers and brahmins and is the benefit of being a seeker or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and brahmins (b), V.182
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins 2, II.1679

IV. Sukhindriya (or Uppaṭi) Vagga, V.207

[31] Suddhika Suttaɱ, V.207

The Buddha describes five forces: that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment.

PTS: Puritan, V.183
WP: Simple Version, II.1679

[32] Sota Suttaɱ, V.207

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that understanding the arising, the settling down, the pleasure and the escape from the five forces (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment) is what qualifies one as a streamwinner.

PTS: The Stream, V.183
WP: Stream-Enterer, II.1680

[33] Arahā Suttaɱ, V.208

The Buddha teaches the bhikkhus that understanding the arising, the settling down, the pleasure and the escape from the five forces (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment) and having freed one's self from them without residual fuel is what qualifies one as an arahant.

PTS: Arahant, V.183
WP: Arahant, II.1680

[34] Paṭhama Sammaṇabrāhmaṇa Suttaɱ, V.208

Whether or not one understands the five forces (indriani) (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment), their arising, their settling down and the escape from them, is the mark of a seeker or Brahmin among seekers and brahmins and is the benefit of being a seeker or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (a), V.183
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins, II.1680

[35] Dutiya Sammaṇabrāhmaṇa Suttaɱ, V.208

Whether or not one understands the five forces (indriani) (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment), their arising, their settling down and the escape from them, is the mark of a seeker or Brahmin among seekers and brahmins and is the benefit of being a seeker or brahmin.

PTS: Recluses and Brahmins (b), V.184
WP: Ascetics and Brahmins 2, II.1680

[36] Paṭhama Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ, V.209

The Buddha gives detailed definitions of each of the five forces (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment).

PTS: Analysis (a), V.184
WP: Analysis, II.1681

[37] Dutiya Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ, V.209

The Buddha gives detailed definitions of each of the five forces (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment). He then shows how each of these forces are to be regarded as sense-experiences.

PTS: Analysis (b), V.185
WP: Analysis 2, II.1681

[38] Tatiya Vibhaŋga Suttaɱ, V.210

The Buddha gives detailed definitions of each of the five forces (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment). He then shows how each of these forces are to be regarded as sense-experiences.

PTS: Analysis c, V.185
WP: Analysis 3, II.1682
ATI: An Analysis, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[39] Araṇi or Kaṭṭhopama Suttaɱ V.211

In the same way as fire arises from the contact of two fire sticks rubbing against each other in the presence of fuel, it is due to contact of an experiencer with an object to be experienced that the forces of pleasure, pain, happiness and unhappiness and impassivity are experienced.

PTS: The Fire-stick, V.186
WP: The Simile of the Fire-Sticks, II.1682
ATI: The Fire-stick, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[40] Uppatika Suttaɱ, V.213

The Buddha explains how each of the five forces (that of pleasure, that of pain, that of mental ease, that of mental discomfort and that of detachment) is to be understood in it's arising, in it's settling down and in the escape from it.

PTS: Consequent, V.187
BD: In Order Experienced, Olds, trans.
WP: Irregular Order, II.1683
Discussion

V. Jarā Vagga, V.216

[41] Jarā Suttaɱ, V.216

Ananda remarks on the changed brought upon the forces of the Buddha by old age. The Buddha responds by telling him that aging is inherant in youth, sickness in health, death in living.

PTS: Old Age, V.191
WP: Subject to Aging, II.1686
ATI: Old Age, Bhikkhu Thanissaro, trans.

[42] Uṇṇābho Brāhmaṇa Suttaɱ, V.217

The Buddha instructs Uddabha the Brahmin that mind is the home of the five senses, and seated in mind is the bringing to life of the five senses scope and pasturage; memory is the home of mind, and seated in memory is the bringing to life of the mind's scope and pasturage; freedom is the home of memory, and seated in freedom is the bringing to life of memory's scope and pasturage; Nibbana is the home of freedom, and seated in Nibbana is the bringing to life of freedom's scope and pasturage; and that to ask about the home of Nibbana is beyond the possibility of answering, and the scope and pasturage of Nibbana is beyond encompassing.

PTS: Uṇṇābha the Brahmain, V.192
WP: The Brahmin Unnabha, II.1687 BD: Uṇṇābha the Brahmain, Olds trans.
Discussion

[43] Sāketa Suttaɱ, V.219

The Buddha provides a simile by way of illustrating how it can be understood that the five forces (indriaya) (faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom) can be thought of as the same thing as the five powers (balani) (faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom).
The simile is that of a river divided by an island where from one perspecive it can be seen as two bodies of water and from another as a single body of water. The island is individuality. From the perspective of the individual the forces are objective energies that act on it while the powers are subjective uses of those forces; from an objective perspective they are one and the same thing.

PTS: Sāketa, V.194
WP: Saketa, II.1688

[44] Pubbakoṭṭhaka Suttaɱ, V.220

In a lesson clearly directed at teaching the bhikkhus the distinction between faith and knowledge, the Buddha questions Sariputta as to whether or not he believes that the five forces lead to Nibbana. Sariputta states that he does not go by faith in this matter but by has realized it for himself.

PTS: Eastern Gatehouse, V.195
WP: The Eastern Gatehouse, II.1689
ATI: Eastern Gatehouse

[45] Paṭhama Pubbārama Suttaɱ, V.222

By developing and making a big thing of just the force of wisdom one can make an end and attain arahantship because that one force encompasses the other four.

PTS: East Park (a), V.197
WP: The Eastern Park, II.1690

[46] Dutiya Pubbārama Suttaɱ, V.222

By developing and making a big thing of the Ariyan wisdom and freedom one can make an end and attain arahantship because the Ariyan wisdom is the force of wisdom and the Ariyan freedom is the force of serenity.
This sutta seems confused. It may depend on a much more pronounced understanding of 'Ariyan wisdom and freedom' than currently exists, but I suspect it is a confusion of two suttas or sets of suttas. First Gotama states that by two forces one may attain arahantship, then defines those two forces as the Ariyan wisdom and freedom, then states that these are the equivalant of the forces of wisdom and serenity. This sutta is in a group that looks like it should be an orderly progression: 1 force: wisdom; 2 forces: wisdom + serenity; 3 forces: wisdom + serenity + memory; 4 fources: wisdom + serenity + memory + energy; five forces: wisdom + serenity + memory + energy + faith. In stead we get this strangely mixed sutta for #2 and #3 is omitted altogether. Still, it does give us another example of the way we must remember that terms in this system overlap each other.

PTS: East Park (b), V.198
WP: The Eastern Park 2, II.1691

[47] Tatiya Pubbārama Suttaɱ, V.223

By developing and making a big thing of energy, memory, serenity and wisdom one can make an end and attain arahantship.

PTS: East Park (c), V.198
WP: The Eastern Park 3, II.1692

[48] Catuttha Pubbārama Suttaɱ, V.223

By developing and making a big thing of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom one can make an end and attain arahantship.

PTS: East Park (d), V.198
WP: The Eastern Park 4, II.1692

[49] Piṇḍola Suttaɱ, V.224

The Buddha explains to the bhikkhus that Pindola the Bharadvajan attained arahantship based on his cultivation of memory, serenity and wisdom.
Piṇḍola: 'just a dole'. Perhaps this sutta explains the missing 3s version in the previous series.

PTS: Scrap-Hunter, V.199
WP: Pindola, II.1692

[50] Saddha or Āpaṇa Suttaɱ, V.225

An exposition of five forces (indriya): faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom and how one established in faith builds up stepwise useing these to attain insight overcoming all doubt as to the teacher or the doctrine. An important sutta for the understanding of the goal of satipatthana practice, and for the over-all goal. The goal of setting up sati is clearly stated to be: 'calling to mind and remembering things said long ago'. (other versions of this have it as 'said and done'; see: AN 10.50 Woodward § 11). This when joined with tranquillity allows for such detachment as makes clear the perception "A world without end is the round of rebirth.' This is a recollection conjoined with a conclusion about what is remembered as it relates to its projection out into the future and to desire for things of the future. Otherwise stated as 'insight into the rise and fall of things.' At a certain point, recollecting and recollecting (as it is said in this sutta) one has made conscious enough various experiences to see that the idea that things come to an end is, without exception, a feature of everything that has come into existence and that this is not a desirable thing. In other words, a worldly goal is futile and painful. This is important to burn into one's consciousness! Try and imagine having lived forever and ever, having lived every variety of form of life times beyond counting. Try and form the idea of a boundless boredom and the dangers in attempting to escape this boredom in strange and unusual forms (usually ending in rebirth in Hell, e.g., being a Hitler) or the utter shame of discovering one has been hiding from the truth in mediocrity. Escape from the world, letting absoltuely everything in the world go, being entirely without worldly ambition is not what is generally taught about the practice of Buddhism but the objection is not that the practice of paying attention, or paying attention to the breathing will not produce clarity and strength of mind which can be put to good use in furthering worldly goals; the objection is to the making of the statement or the implying that this is the goal of Buddhism. It isn't.

PTS: Faithful or Market, V.200
WP: At Apana, II.1693

VI. V.227

[51] Sālā Suttaɱ, V.227

The Buddha likens wisdom to the strength, speed and courage of the lion in it's usefulness for attaining awakening.
Woodward's translations of Pañña and bodhā as 'insight' and 'wisdom' here are liable to cause confusion as elsewhere Pañña is usually translated 'wisdom' and bodhā is translated in some way that indicates awakening (e.g. Bodhi: 'enlightenment') (and 'insight' is the common translation for 'vipassana') and here it leads Woodward, in his effort to indicate that this is not just ordinary 'wisdom' but the wisdom of an awakened one, to translate the term here and hereafter as 'the wisdom' which sounds very awkward.

PTS: Sālā, V.202
WP: Sala, II.1695

[52] Mallika Suttaɱ, V.228

The Buddha likens the stabilizing effect of knowledge on the forces of faith, energy, memory, and serenity to the stabilizing effect of the ridge-beam on the roofbeams of a house with a peaked roof.
Woodward has further complicated the picture here (from the previous sutta) by now translating 'ñāṇa' as 'insight'.

 

Pali Olds Woodward Bhk. Bodhi Bhk. Thanissaro
Pañña Wisdom Insight Wisdom Discernment
Bodhi, bodhā Awakening Wisdom Enlightenment Awakening
Ñāṇa Knowledge Insight Knowledge Knowledge

 

PTS: Mallika, V.203
WP: Mallikas, II.1695

[53] Sekho Suttaɱ, V.229

The Buddha describes how the beginner can know that he has become a seeker and how the seeker can know that he has become one who needs no longer seek.

PTS: Learner, V.204
WP: A Trainee, II.1696
ATI: The Learner, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[54] Pada Suttaɱ, V.231

Just as all the characteristics of feet, of creatures that walk around on feet, are found united in the footprint of the elephant and of footprints the elephant's is considered chief, that is, in terms of size; in the same way all the characteristics of awakening of beings walking toward awakening are found united in the footprints of wisdom, and of footprints of awakening, wisdom is considered chief, that is in terms of walking towards awakening.

PTS: In the Foot, V.206
WP: Footprints, II.1697

[55] Sāra Suttaɱ, V.231

The Buddha uses the simile of the supremacy of red sandalwood as a scented heart-wood to illustrate the centrality of wisdom in the effort at awakening.

PTS: Heart-wood, V.206
WP: Heartwood, II.1698

[56] Patiṭṭhita Suttaɱ, V.232

The Buddha aserts that by the setting up of one thing: namely carefulness, one gards the mind amid the corrupting influences and in so doing brings the five forces (faith, energy, memory, serenity, and wisdom) under control.

PTS: Established, V.207
WP: Established, II.1698
ATI: Established, Bhk. Thanissaro, trans.

[57] Brahmā Suttaɱ, V.232

The Brahma Sahampati confirms the Buddha's thought that when the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity, and wisdom are cultavated and made a big thing of they result in attaining Arahantship.
For students of the Pali language it should be interesting to note the way this Brahma is known: that is by his name being repeated twice. A name or word being repeated twice is understood to indicate an ultimate. 'Ladies and Gentlemen! The One and Only Brahma Sahampati!' 'Janusoni's white carriage, superb white carriage!' 'the king's army, unbeatable army!'

PTS: Brahmā, V.207
WP: Brahma Sahampati, II.1699

[58] Sūkarakhatā Suttaɱ, V.233

The Buddha rehearses Sariputta in the various practices of the Arahant.

PTS: Boar's Cave, V.209
WP: The Boar's Cave, II.1699

[59] Paṭhama Uppāda Suttaɱ, V.235

The Buddha explains that it is only upon the arising of a Buddha that the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom can be made much of and reach full development.
Both Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi word this in such a way as to mean that these forces do not arise at all without the appearance of a Buddha. But we can see for ourselves that at least energy, memory, serenity and wisdom of a sort do arise without the appearance of a Buddha.
The Pali (Pañcimāni bhikkhave, indriyāni, bhāvitāni bahulīkatāni) allows us to say:
"These five indriya, developed and made much of,"
(leading in most cases to some statement concerning the benefit of doing so, but conditioning the translators' ears to this one construction)
can also be heard:
"The development and making much of these five indriya". The only way this sutta makes sense.

PTS: Arising (a), V.210
WP: Arising, II.1701

[60] Dutiya Uppāda Suttaɱ, V.235

The Buddha explains that it is only upon the arising of a Buddha that the forces of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom can be made much of and reach full development.

PTS: Arising (b), V.211
WP: Arising 2, II.1701

VII. Bodhipakkhiya Vaggo, V.236

[61] Saŋyojana Suttaɱ, V.236

Developing and making much of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom leads to breaking the yokes to rebirth.

PTS: Fetter, V.211
WP: Fetters, II.1701

[62] Anusaya Suttaɱ, V.236

Developing and making much of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom leads to exterpation of residual tendencies to lust, hate and blindness.

PTS: Tendency, V.211
WP: Underlying Tendencies, II.1701

[63] Pariññā or Addhāna Suttaɱ, V.236

Developing and making much of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom leads to thorough understanding of the Buddhist system.

PTS: Comprehension or The Way Out, V.211
WP: Full Understanding, II.1702

[64] Āsavakkhaya Suttaɱ, V.236

Developing and making much of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom leads to the corrupting influences of lust, becomming and blindness.

PTS: Destruction of the Āsavas, V.211
WP: The Destruction of the Taints, II.1702

[65] Dve Phalā Suttaɱ V.236

Developing and making much of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom leads either to arahantship in this world or to non-returning.

PTS: Two Fruits, V.211
WP: Two Fruits, II.1702

[66] Satt'ānisaŋsā Suttaɱ, V.237

Developing and making much of faith, energy, memory, serenity and wisdom leads either to arahantship in this world or to one or another of six forms of non-returning.

PTS: Seven Advantages, V.212
WP: Seven Benefits, II.1702

[67] Paṭhama Rukkha Suttaɱ, V.237

As in India the Rose-apple tree is held in highest regard, so of factors leading to awakening, wisdom is held in highest regard.

PTS: The Tree (a), V.212
WP: The Tree, II.1703

[68] Dutiya Rukkha Suttaɱ, V.238

As in the realm of the Devas of the Thirty-three the coral tree is held in highest regard, so of factors leading to awakening, wisdom is held in highest regard.

PTS: The Tree (b), V.213
WP: The Tree 2, II.1703

[69] Tatiya Rukkha Suttaɱ, V.238

As in the realm of the Asuras (Monsters) the pied trumpet-flower tree is held in highest regard, so of factors leading to awakening, wisdom is held in highest regard.

PTS: The Tree (c), V.213
WP: The Tree 3, II.1703

[70] Catuttha Rukkha Suttaɱ, V.238

As in the realm of the Supanna Birds the silk cotton tree tree is held in highest regard, so of factors leading to awakening, wisdom is held in highest regard.

PTS: The Tree (d), V.213
WP: The Tree 4, II.1704

VIII. Gangā-Peyyālo V.239

Covering suttas 71-82. The Buddha likens the flow of great rivers to the way in which cultivating the five forces brings one to Nibbana.

[Suttas 71-124 follow the pattern established for the Satipatthanasamyutta. The PTS Pali and Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi translations are all almost completely abridged and follow another pattern in which sections VII-XII (Suttas 71-124) are all organized under the heading 'based on seclusion' and another set of sections, XIII - XVII (Suttas 125-178) is organized under the heading 'restraint of lust.' This doubles the number of suttas while halving the subjects covered and is, I believe, a mistake.]

PTS: Ganga Repetition, V.214
WP: Ganges Repetition Series, II. 1706

 

[71] Paṭhama Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Eastward a, V.214
WP: 71-82: The River Ganges - Eastward, Etc, II.1704

[72] Dutiya Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Eastward b.1, V.214

[73] Tatiya Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Eastward b.2, V.214

[74] Catuttha Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Eastward b.3, V.214

[75] Pañcama Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Eastward b.4, V.214

[76] Chaṭṭha Pācīna Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Eastward c, V.214

[77] Paṭhama Samudda Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Ocean (a), V.214

[78] Dutiya Samudda Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Ocean (b.1), V.214

[79] Tatiya Samudda Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Ocean (b.2), V.214

[80] Catuttha Samudda Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Ocean (b.3), V.214

[81] Pañcama Samudda Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Ocean (b.4), V.214

[82] Pañcama Samudda Suttaɱ, V.239

PTS: Ocean (c), V.214

IX. Appamāda Vagga: Viveka V.240

Covering suttas 83-92. Nine similes for the caution that is the fundamental condition that leads to the bringing to life of the five forces.

PTS: Earnestness, V.215
WP: Diligence, II.1705

[83] Tathāgata Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Tathāgata, V.215
WP: 83-92: The Tathāgata, Etc., II.1705

[84] Pada Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The foot, V.215

[85] Kūṭa Suttaɱ, V. 185

PTS: The roof-peak, V.215

[86] Mūla Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Wood, V.215

[87] Sāra Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Heart Wood, V.215

[88] Vassika Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Jasmine, V.215

[89] Rājā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Prince, V.215

[90] Canda Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Moon, V.215

[91] Suriya Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Sun, V.215

[92] Vattha Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Cloth, V.215

X. Balakaraṇīya Vagga: V.191

Covering suttas 93-104. The Buddha provides twelve similes illustrating various aspects of the Dhamma.

PTS: Deeds Requiring Strength, V.215
WP: Strenuous Deeds, II. 1705

 

[93] Bala Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Strength, V.215
WP: 73-84: Strenuous, Etc., II.1705

[94] Bījā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Seed, V.215

[95] Nāga Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Snake, V.215

[96] Rukkha Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Tree, V.215

[97] Kumbha Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Pot, V.215

[98] Sukiya Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Bearded Wheat, V.215

[99] Ākāsa Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Sky, V.215

[100] Paṭhama Megha Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Rain-cloud a, V.215

[101] Dutiya Megha Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Rain-cloud b, V.215

[102] Nāvā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The Ship, V.215

[103] Āgantukā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: For All Comers, V.215

[104] Nadī Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: The River, V.215

XI. Esanā Vagga, V.240

Covering suttas 105=114. The buddha explains how the five forces are to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of wishes, delusions, corrupting influences, existence, pain, closed-mindedness, flare-ups, sense-experience, and thirst.

PTS: Longings, V.215
WP: Searches, II. 1705

 

[105] Esanā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Longing, V.215
WP: 85-94: Searches, Etc., II.1705

[106] Vidhā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Conceits, V.215

[107] Āsava Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Asava, V.215

[108] Bhava Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Becoming, V.215

[109] Dukkhatā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Suffering, V.215

[110] Khilā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Obstructions, V.215

[111] Mala Suttaɱ, V. 1111

PTS: Stain, V.215

[112] Nighā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Pains, V.215

[113] Vedanā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Feelings, V.215

[114] Taṇhā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Craving, V.215

94.2 Tasinā or Taṇhā Suttaɱ, V.240

PTS: Thirst, V.215

XII. Ogha Vagga: Viveka, V.241

Covering suttas 115-124. The buddha explains how the five forces are to be used for the higher knowledge of, thorough knowledge of, thorough destruction of, for the letting go of the floods, the bonds, yokes to rebirth, ties to the body, risidual inclinations, sense pleasures, diversions, the fuel stockpiles, the yokes to lower rebirths, the yokes to higher rebirths.

PTS: The Flood, V.216
WP: Floods, II. 1705

 

[115] Ogha Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: The Flood, V.216
WP: 95-104: Floods, Higher Fetters, II. 1705

[116] Yoga Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: Bond, V.216

[117] Upādānam Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: Grasping, V.216

[118] Ganthā Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: (Bodily) Ties, V.216

[119] Anusayā Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: Tendency, V.216

[120] Kāmaguṇa Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: The Sense-Pleasures, V.216

[121] Nivaraṇāni Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: Hindrances, V.216

[122] Khandā Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: Factors, V.216

[123] Orambhāgiya Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: The Lower Set (of Fetters), V.216

[124] Uddhambhāgiya Suttaɱ, V.241

PTS: The Higher Set (of Fetters), V.216

 

[In the PTS Pali and Woodward and Bhk. Bodhi translations there follows sections XIII - XVII (Suttas 125-178) repeating Sections VII-XII changing only the abridgment 'based on seclusion' to 'restraint of lust'. The arrangement here incorporates that heading, and the additional headings: 'plunging into the deathless' and 'flowing to Nibbana' in various arrangements following the pattern established in SN 47. Satipatthanasamyutta.]


 [I. Sagathavagga]  [II. Nidanavagga]  [III. Khandhavagga]  [IV. Salayatanavagga]  [V. Mahavagga]

 [Maggasamyutta]  [Bojjhangasamyutta]  [Satipatthanasamyutta]  [Indriyasamyutta]  [Sammappadhanasamyutta]  [Balasamyutta]  [Iddhipadasamyutta]  [Anuruddhasamyutta]  [Jhanasamyutta]  [Anapanasamyutta]  [Sotapattisamyutta]  [Saccasamyutta]

 


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